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College Receives $95,680 for Energy-Efficient Lights

03/04/2010 

SUNY Cortland has received $95,680 to replace lighting in the Park Center Corey Gymnasium and Alumni Arena as part of the second round of funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) State Energy Program.

The funds are among $40 million awarded to New York municipalities, public schools, universities and colleges, hospitals and not-for-profit agencies to support 118 energy conservation projects, announced Gov. David Paterson on March 1.

 “At a time when many are working with less, we must make wise investments that both create savings and plan for our future,” said Paterson. “These funds will provide public and non-profit entities with critical resources needed to make long-term investments that will reduce their energy costs and save taxpayers money.”

Collectively, the energy efficiency, renewable energy and clean fleet projects will reduce energy and operating costs by $13.5 million annually and fully return the initial investment in just under seven years, added Paterson.

“These projects will invigorate the State's economy, heighten the demand for clean renewable technologies, and help put New Yorkers to work in the clean energy economy. I applaud President Obama and our Congressional Delegation for their work to secure these critical funds that promote economic recovery, energy independence and strong environmental stewardship."

SUNY Cortland will replace a combined 188 metal halide lights with high-efficiency T-5 fluorescent fixtures in Alumni Arena and Corey Gymnasium that will result in an estimated $18,460 in annual savings to the College.

 “The project, which should take approximately six months, still needs to be designed and bid for construction,” explained Robert Carr, project manager and associate facilities program coordinator at SUNY Cortland. “Construction is planned for public bid after the design is complete.”

A consultant, Einhorn, Yaffee Prescott  A&E, P.C., completed a lighting system analysis report that accompanied the grant application. The project will cost an estimated $119,600, with the ARRA grant covering 80 percent and the College funding the remaining $23,920, said Carr.

New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) received more than 300 proposals for ARRA funds and evaluated them on a competitive basis. Primary selection criteria included technical viability, cost-effectiveness, demonstration of compliance with program requirements, and cost sharing. Each awardee must still successfully enter into contract and meet all ARRA requirements prior to funding being released.

“We are fortunate to be awarded this funding, especially since relatively few SUNY campuses received funding,” said Carr. “In addition to reducing energy use, based on other projects, the planned new lights should also provide a more even lighting and operate with less noise. Thus, the project will provide better quality lighting and controls, put contractors to work, purchase new equipment, reduce the overall campus energy demand, and reduce annual energy cost for the long term.”

In October 2009, SUNY Cortland was the lone Central New York public college or university to receive first round ARRA funding. The College received an $80,000 grant to replace the Lusk Field House lights this year.

The next round of ARRA funding for the remaining $8.8 million has been announced with proposals.