Fall Course Descriptions

English Courses

Detailed Course Descriptions for Selected Courses

Adolescence Education

Literature

Professional Writing

300 Level Courses

200 Level Courses

200 Level Courses

600 Level Courses

300 Level Courses

300 Level Courses

400 Level Courses

500/600 Level Courses

  

Adolescence Education (English) Courses


AED 308: Grammar and the Writing Process

(LASR)

McKenzie

MWF 12:40 - 1:30 p.m.

Grammar instruction has a bad reputation. The words “grammar lesson” elicit feelings of fear and boredom, and the ubiquitous practice of “correcting” student papers with gashes of red ink sends the message that some people speak and write in “proper” ways while others are deficient in the English language. But grammar instruction does not have to be painful, and it is possible to teach grammar in ways that honor adolescents’ literacy practices! In this course, students will deepen their knowledge of English grammar and develop strategies for grammar instruction, but they will also explore linguistic and historical perspectives on grammar, perspectives that will help the class grapple with the relationship between grammar instruction and patterns of power and oppression. In addition to completing and discussing course readings, students will create and teach grammar lessons, hone their knowledge of grammar through experimental writing assignments, and complete 30 hours of field work.

AED 663: Research: Teaching of English

McKenzie

W 4:20-6:50 p.m.

English Language Arts teachers have many pedagogical tools at their disposal: reading journals, grammar worksheets, graphic organizers, think-pair-share dialogues, whole class discussion, mini-lectures, etc., etc.. While most teachers have a variety of tools, they’re not always equipped with the skills they need to understand how these tools are working in their classroom. This course will explore the ways scholars and teachers research pedagogical tools and how teachers can use this research to inform their pedagogy. During the first part of the semester, students will explore current hot topics in the research on the teaching of English and consider how this research might impact the work they do in their classrooms. During the second half of the semester, students will explore one topic in depth and will compose a research proposal for a project they could conduct in their own classroom.

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Literature Courses


ENG 200 (Section 003): Introduction to Literature

(GE 7, LASR)

Colella

MWF 10:20-11:10 a.m.

A thorough exploration of poetry, short stories, and plays that will strengthen your ability to critically analyze, interpret, and extract information from these forms of literature more easily and effectively. We will apply a variety of critical lenses to assist your understanding and enrich your experience while being critically engaged and having fun.

If you have typically found interpreting poetry, short stories and plays to be difficult and boring in the past, this course is designed to present you with the tools and the know how to bring you a more fun, fulfilling and engaging literary experience. You will also have the opportunity to be the teachers of your peers through collaborative group projects and presentations, as well as your individual writing.

ENG 202-001: Introduction to Fiction

(GE 7)

Gailanne Mackenzie

MWF 9:10-10 a.m.

This course explores works of contemporary fiction using different approaches to literary analysis. Students will also be encouraged to experiment with writing their own fiction. The reading list is partially chosen by the students, and will include novels and stories by familiar and less-familiar writers such as Khaled Hosseini, John Green, Toni Morrison, Mark Haddon, Julia Glass, Roald Dahl, Shirley Jackson, Ian McEwan, Elizabeth Strout, Stephen King, Alice Munro, John Updike, Leslie Daniels, and Nicola Keegan.

ENG 203-001: Introduction to Poetry

(GE 7, WRIT)

Alwes

MWF 10:20-11:10 a.m.

This class is an introduction to the various poets of our generation as well as generations of the past. Major poets of national and international renown and their poetry will be read and enjoyed.

ENG 203-002: Introduction to Poetry

(GE 7, WRIT)

Masselink

MW 6-7:15 p.m.

Poems are a bit like puzzles just waiting for attentive readers to solve them. From Old English riddles to contemporary rap, Mother Goose to Shakespeare’s sonnets, poetry speaks a language like no other. In this course, we will examine the way poets over the centuries break new ground, while at the same time building upon and acknowledging the contributions of those who wrote before them. Students will learn to read critically as well as for enjoyment and will write one paper in two parts, with opportunities for revision along the way.

ENG 208-002: Intro to Film Analysis

(GE 7, WRIT)

Leffel

TR 1:15-2:30 p.m.

Students will learn the basics of film analysis by viewing, discussing, and writing critically about a diverse range of films (and film clips). Required readings will cover a range of topics, including cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, acting, and so on. Directors to be considered will likely include: Stanley Kubrick, Robert Altman, Roman Polanski, Jordan Peele, Wes Anderson, and others.

ENG 208-003: Introduction to Film Analysis

(GE 7, WRIT)

Borden

TR 2:50-4:05 p.m.

This course is an introduction to the movies as an art form. In our section, we’ll study such movies as Christopher Nolan’s Memento, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather, Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, and Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List. We’ll also study one of Disney’s animated features, maybe Frozen, and we’ll select other movies together. Each week we’ll focus on a single movie for viewing and discussion – twelve movies in all – to see precisely how it works. Through practice we’ll learn to analyze movies as texts, to value their distinctive qualities, and to develop ever more capable ways of thinking about them and through them. As a textbook, you’ll need either a subscription to Amazon Prime, which is currently $12.99 a month, or a 6-month trial subscription to Prime Student, which is free.

English 260: The Literature of Sports

(GE 7)

Anderson

MWF 1:50-2:40 p.m.

In their A Brief History of American Sports, Gorn and Goldstein tell us that sports have “always been Janus-faced.” That in sports literature, while we witness the “beauty, grace, and passion” of human achievement, we also experience the “strange mixture of sordidness and transcendence, crudity and refinement, venality and selflessness” that make this literature an appealing and significant art. For athletes, they insist, sports can be seen as the “expressive outlets for people who did not compose symphonies, publish treatises, or design buildings.” In this course we will read and share the essays, stories, novels, and poems that explore the joys and sorrows of the best sports literature; how it so completely involves each of us in the ethical, emotional, social, and even political realities that define our apparently dominant sports culture.

English 261: Women in Literature

(GE 7, WRIT)

Knight

TR 4:25-5:40 p.m.

This GE-7 writing-intensive course will examine the literary depiction of women representing different historical periods and cultures. We will be reading novels by Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, and Kaye Gibbons; a play by Susan Glaspell; and a number of short stories and poems by both male and female authors. Specific topics to be addressed include women’s self-image; female sexuality; women’s health and survival; race, class, and gender issues; maternity; and patriarchal and cultural assumptions about femaleness and feminism.

English 290: Introduction to Literary Study

(GE 7, WRIT)

Radus

MW 3-4:15 p.m.

What is literature? How do we study it? How do we write about books we read? Though these questions seem simple, in fact they've been debated for centuries—and our answers to them shift continuously in response to social, cultural, and political forces. In this course, we'll address these questions and others. Our objective will be to create a solid foundation for further study in English. Short readings and active in-class discussions will inform a series of informal and creative writing assignments.

ENG 302: Writing about Literature

(LASR)

Stone

TR 10:05-11:20 a.m., 11:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m.

Social Constructs. Necropolitics. Actor Networks. Today’s literary scholars have access to a vast array of theoretical ideas and methods they can draw on to read and write about literature and culture. The purpose of this class is to survey some of these fascinating ideas and learn their methods of analysis so we can make our own reading and writing more innovative, powerful, and persuasive.

ENG and AEN(W) majors must complete ENG 290 before enrolling in ENG 302.

ENG 307: New Media Literacies and ELA

(LASR)

McKenzie

MW 3-4:15 p.m.

Our lives are enmeshed in new media. From Snapchat to search engines, Pinterest to PowerPoint, digital media shapes the way we communicate, learn, build communities, and cultivate identities. ENG 307 will consider the role of new media in adolescents’ lives and in the English classroom, focusing in particular on the pedagogical, developmental, political, and ethical issues raised when teachers integrate digital technologies into their curriculum. In addition to completing and discussing course readings, students will research youth digital literacy practices, experiment with digital media, and develop lesson plans that incorporate new media.

ENG 325: American Literature Before 1900

(LASR)

Radus

MWF 12:40-1:30 p.m.

What does it mean to describe a work of literature as “American”? What does that term signify? Who decides? How has that term—and the literature it defines—changed in response to the cultural, social, and political forces that have shaped our nation? In this class, we'll consider these questions, devoting particular attention to how writers from various ethnic, racial, and gendered backgrounds addressed issues that influenced the development of the United States. Readings will include Rowlandson's Narrative (1682), Franklin's Autobiography (1793), Foster's The Coquette (1797), Apess's A Son of the Forest (1829), Douglass's Narrative (1845), Melville's Benito Cereno (1855), the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson, and Crane's Maggie (1893), in addition to shorter works. Our active in-class discussions will be supplemented by short papers and two exams.

ENG 326: American Literature Since 1900

(LASR)

Lessig

MW 4:25-5:40 p.m.

This course aims to deepen your interpretative and critical skills, and to show some of the range and diversity of twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature. The United States has had a rich and varied literary history, and any introduction to American literature must make some difficult choices as to what to include in the syllabus and what to leave out. We will sample a variety of cultural movements and moments, such as modernism, the New Negro Renaissance, proletarian literature, postmodernism, Black Arts, and more. We will not only read closely, but we will also examine texts within their historical, political, and literary contexts in order to explore how American literature has engaged with some of the important issues of our nation's history. Assigned texts likely to include the Heath Anthology of American Literature, Vol D & E; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Kingston, The Woman Warrior.

ENG 355 Major Figures in British Literature to 1780

(LASR)

Masselink

MW 3-4:15 p.m.

If you like a challenge and want to be able to say that you have read some of the greatest writers ever to put pen to paper (or in most cases, quill to vellum), then ENG 355 is the course for you. In ENG 355, you will tackle classics like Beowulf, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, and Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Because many of the works are challenging, students will be provided with study questions to guide their reading, and grades are determined on the basis of efforts put into answering those study questions (and/or responses to the assigned readings), participation in class discussions, and three tests.

ENG 356: Major Figures in British Literature 1780-Present

(LASR)

Alwes

MWF 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

This class will explore the major British writers of the late 18th, full 19th, and early 20th centuries. We will read poetry as well as prose in discovering the literature of those very important eras, which gave us the Romantic, Victorian, and early Modern writers whom we know by their words today.

ENG 402: Grammar

(LASR)

Masselink

MW 4:25-5:40 p.m.

Have you ever wondered why no words native to the English language end in “v” or “j”? Or why “thorough” “thought,” “bough” “rough,” “cough” and “through” share the same four-letter combination, but do not rhyme? Do you wish you had a better grasp on spelling, the parts of speech, or various comma rules? Are you intrigued with words and word formation in general? If you said “yes” to any of the above, ENG 402 is the course for you.

In this rigorous course, you will study phonology (the study of sound patterns)--particularly in relationship to reading and spelling, morphology (the study of word formation), and syntax (the rules for the formation of grammatical sentences). Former students who’ve completed the course say it should be required of all education majors, but whether you plan to teach or you just want to learn more about grammar, you will leave this class feeling far more confident in your ability to explain how our language works. While the reading load for this course is fairly light, in addition to a midterm and a final, students will complete written exercises, honing their ability to explain every letter, every word, every phrase in any sentence.

ENG 429: School Stories: The Literature of Indian Education

Radus

MWF 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

In the late nineteenth century and throughout the twentieth, scores of Native American children were taken from their homes and enrolled in residential schools across the United States. In this course, we’ll read first-hand and fictionalized accounts of their experiences. We’ll also read the records of teachers and administrators. We’ll consider the effects of this educational program—how it stripped Native Americans of their cultural heritage, of course, but also how it opened up opportunities for cross-cultural engagement and resistance. Our discussion-oriented seminar will be supplemented by informal presentations and a research-based essay, to be completed in stages over the course of the semester.

ENG 431: Arthurian Literature

(WRIT)

Harbin

TR 1:15-2:30 p.m.

Stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table have been popular for about 900 years. This class will explore how this legend developed over time from early Welsh tales, through French Romance, Middle English Romance, and even into the modern era. Texts include: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Le Morte D’Arthur, Shrek, and, of course, Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

ENG 433: Shakespeare

(WRIT)

Leffel

TR 11:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m.

This class is a critical survey of William Shakespeare’s poetic and dramatic art. In addition to a selection of Shakespeare’s sonnets, plays to be studied include: Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest. Besides reading aloud and performing select scenes, we will also watch film and stage versions to enliven discussion and emphasize issues of performance and adaptation. Students will also analyze the plays in relation to literary, cultural, and historical texts and contexts.

ENG 445: The Romantic Age

(WRIT)

Alwes

MW 3-4:15 p.m.

This class focuses on the English Romantic era, which includes the famed poets who imagined beyond the boundaries of reality and into the ideal of immortality through their writing, because, as John Keats said, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

ENG 504: Seminar in the Composing Process: Rhetoric and Analysis

Davies

T 3-5:30 p.m.

In ENG 504, students develop practical strategies for teaching writing that are grounded in contemporary writing research and theory. This course requires 30 fieldwork observation hours.

Students will design writing activities, assignments and assessments; plan and deliver lessons that address different stages in the writing process; and practice responding to and evaluating student writing. The course projects ask students to design instructional materials for a variety of commonly assigned genres in secondary English language arts. Students will read and analyze foundational writing pedagogy theories and compose a researched “best practices” guideline statement about a current issue in the teaching of writing. Students will explore the intersections between reading and writing and the implications of literacy, culture, and language policies on the teaching of writing in secondary schools.

ENG 504 will be held at Homer Junior High School. As part of this course, ENG 504 students will tutor at-risk 7th and 8th grade students in a 10th-period Writing Workshop every Tuesday afternoon. This shared fieldwork experience will give students the opportunity work with student writers and to see first-hand how writing is taught in secondary classrooms. The Writing Workshop hours count towards the required 30 fieldwork observation hours.

ENG 548 British Literature 1950 – Present – "Nonhuman Britishness"

Stone

T 4:20-6:50 p.m.

Tortoises. Star Trek figurines. Theme parks. The London Underground. Contemporary literary and cultural artists use animals, objects, spaces, and systems to rethink the concept of Britishness. This seminar will draw on recent theories of the nonhuman to explore this development in contemporary novels, plays, films, and events. This course is open to graduates and advanced undergraduates.

ENG 640: Studies in Eng. Lit 1660-1800: Persons. Animals. Things.

Leffel

M 4:20-6:50 p.m.

Drawing upon recent critical and theoretical trends in thing theory, material culture, animal studies, post-humanism, and slavery studies, in this course we will explore the practical, theoretical and rhetorical erosion of the categorical boundaries differentiating persons, animals, and things during the long eighteenth century. Students will analyze and put into conversation a range of literary, visual, cultural, and political texts, including novels, poems, plays, petitions, slave narratives, it-narratives, broadsides, paintings, satirical prints, and so on.

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Professional Writing


PWR 210: Writing in the Digital Age

(GE 12)

Rutherford

MW 12:40-1:30 p.m. (course), W 4:25-6:05 p.m. (lab)

In this course, we will be reading in/about and creating digital media artifacts to broaden our thinking about research and writing. We’ll develop a more informed perspective and better critical understanding of some of the big questions surrounding digital environments and how they uniquely mediate scientific, technical, technological, social, and cultural information.

Some guiding questions for the course include: How do digital media influence content creation? How do they change the way we access/interpret information, arrive at judgments, and navigate context? How do our creative approaches change in a digital environment? How do new technologies afford and constrain different methods and methodologies for investigating and presenting data?

PWR 212: Writing Fiction

(GE 8, WRIT)

Hernandez

TR 1:15-2:30 p.m.

This semester we will drink each other’s dreams from oaken casks. This is a writing workshop with a focus on self-discovery, on moving our brains like planchettes across the Ouija board of our daydreams and experiences. In this course we will read exclusively what we and our classmates write, in an open-ended, workshop atmosphere of inspiration and analysis. We will write a lot, but we will not revise. Our objective is to confront the chaos of human events with the divining rod of fantasy.

PWR 213: Writing Poetry

(GE 8, WRIT, PRES)

Bartlett

MW 3-4:15 p.m.

"Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful." -Rita Dove This writing workshop is an introduction to the craft of writing poetry. You will spend most of your time writing your own poems and reading poems and craft essays by contemporary writers. Throughout this course, we will be concerned with exploring and discovering personal voice and style, not with traditional form and meter. This is a workshop, which is dependent upon a community of conscious and willing writers. A workshop is much more than a simple discussion of your work; it requires a commitment from every writer in the class to give close attention to new and developing work. In fact, a major text for the course is the raw efforts of its writers. By the end of the course, you will generate and revise multiple poems and a reflection on your own craft.

PWR 315: Creative Nonfiction - The Personal Essay

(GE 8, WRIT)

Bartlett

MWF 10:20-11:10 a.m.

In this course, we will read and write personal essays, exploring the many possibilities within the genre, from memoir to lyric to braided essay. Our emphasis is on developing use of craft and technique, as well as on exploring and discovering personal voice and style. This class is designed as a workshop. While no prior experience writing personal essays is necessary, you should be willing to participate in discussions of craft and style, as well as share writing assignments in a workshop setting. A workshop is much more than a simple discussion of your work; it requires a commitment from every writer in the class to give close attention to new and developing work. In fact, a major text for the course is the raw efforts of its writers. By the end of the course, you will generate and revise multiple pieces and a reflection on your own craft

PWR 398: Business Writing

(LASR)

Emerson

TR 2:50-4:05 p.m. (Hybrid - 1/2 online, 1/2 classroom)

You’ve been studying courses and building skills in your major – but do you know how to present those skills in the marketplace? And how can your presentations bring you results, both in establishing your career and in building success from your endeavors?

This course you how to take the most common forms – resume, cover letter, memo/email, instruction/procedures, reports, proposals, presentations – and not only do them as conventionally expected as a professional, but also do them effectively so that you achieve what you’re setting out to accomplish.

This study includes three main components: (a) knowing and using correct formats, (b) learning to focus paragraphs, sentences, and word choices for effectiveness, and (c) visually formatting documents to aid readability, acceptability, and result-getting impact. This latter aspect will include a study of effective design and using appropriate software to achieve those professional designs.

In short, this course will start you on a journey from accomplished student to polished professional, to someone who communicates well, clearly, and effectively in terms of results. Older students (who had already been in the work force and came back to college) have repeatedly shared “I wish I knew this stuff sooner!”

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