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Part Four: General Policies and Procedures of the College

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Part Four Contents

CHAPTER 410: Admission and Registrar's Office Policies

410.01 ADMISSION POLICY

SUNY Cortland, as a public institution, welcomes applications from all persons who meet the College's admissions standards. A competitive selection process is necessary because the number of students to be accepted must be limited by the College's teaching and physical resources.

With the help of admissions information, including Web information, potential applicants can determine whether or not SUNY Cortland has the programs that meet their needs. SUNY Cortland offers a broad range of major programs for undergraduate students as well as a variety of graduate programs in teacher education, professional studies, English and history. Approximately 21 percent of the College's entering undergraduate students have not decided upon a major at the time they enroll, and ordinarily it is not necessary to decide upon a major until the end of the sophomore year.

410.02 NON-DEGREE STUDENTS

On occasion, individuals who have not applied for degree status at SUNY Cortland enroll in course work, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The College accommodates such individuals by allowing them, on a course-available basis, to register as non-degree students. Undergraduate non-degree students are not permitted to register until the first day of classes each semester. Non-degree students are directed to the Register’s Office at the opening of the semester for additional information. Those students who have been academically dismissed from SUNY Cortland are ineligible for non-degree status. Those students who have applied for and have been denied regular admission to SUNY Cortland are ineligible to enroll at the College during the semester in which they applied for admission.

Non-degree students may enroll only on a part-time basis (11.5 credit hours or less for undergraduates, nine credit hours or less for graduate students). Once undergraduate students have attempted 15 credit hours at SUNY Cortland and once graduate students have completed nine credit hours at SUNY Cortland, they must apply through the Admissions Office for matriculated status (degree status) or discontinue course work at the College. No more than nine credit hours may be taken as a non-matriculated student at the graduate level.

410.03 EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM STUDENTS

In 1968 SUNY Cortland inaugurated a program then called "Project Opportunity," designed to admit students who demonstrate an academic potential despite a background of economic and educational disadvantage. These students should be able to offer evidence of their ability to achieve in college.

Financial assistance through outright grants and loans is available to those who qualify economically and who are admitted to the program. Tutorial help and counseling are provided, if needed, during special summer programs and during the academic year.

410.04 ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CREDIT FOR EQUIVALENCY EXAMINATIONS

SUNY Cortland will accept a maximum of 30 credit hours earned through such sources as Advanced Placement, College Level Examination Program, or College Proficiency and/or the International Baccalaureate. This maximum applies to all of these courses combined, not individually.

Challenge Examinations

At the discretion of individual departments, students may arrange challenge examinations to demonstrate proficiency in the content areas of specific courses for academic credit. Faculty may arrange written, oral or performance exercises to establish competency and the appropriate number of credit hours will be awarded for satisfactory performance with a grade of P. Interested students should contact the department chair responsible for the content area that they wish to challenge. If the department agrees to supervise the challenge, the student is referred to the office of the school dean to complete the appropriate form and pay a fee, if appropriate.

Credit for International Baccalaureate Courses

Students enrolling at SUNY Cortland who have completed International Baccalaureate course work will receive advanced standing credit toward their baccalaureate degree at the College as follows:

  1. Students who have completed the International Baccalaureate diploma will receive up to 30 credit hours (one year's advanced standing).
  2. Students who have not completed the International Baccalaureate diploma will receive equivalent credit for up to two introductory courses for each higher level examination in which a grade of four or better has been earned.
  3. Subsidiary level subjects will be evaluated on an individual basis.
Credit for Equivalency Examinations

Under State University of New York policy, credit will be granted for published examinations from the following test series provided that the specified minimum performance levels are met and that the examinations are in areas that normally receive transfer credit at SUNY Cortland.

SUNY Cortland students are not eligible to receive credit by equivalency examinations when they are enrolled in or have completed a higher level course within the same discipline.

A maximum of 30 credit hours may be earned through these published examinations:

College-Level Examination Program

(Subject Examinations)
Credit is granted for a mean score obtained by persons from the standardization group who have earned a grade of C in a formal course.

College Proficiency Examinations

Credit granted for performance at a grade level of C.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI)

Credit is granted for OPI ratings based on the American Council on Education (ACE) recommended score of awarding credit. Credit will be granted for a rating of Novice High to Superior.

Advanced Placement Program

Credit granted for a score of three or higher within the scale of five points used for this program.

Credit for Courses Taken in Military Service

Credit for and/or waiver of courses or programs taken while in the military service may be granted by the dean of the school in which the student majors with the consultation of the appropriate department chair if these courses or programs are parallel to courses offered at SUNY Cortland. Graduate students may receive such credits or waivers from the transfer credit coordinator in consultation with the appropriate graduate coordinator.

Programs Sponsored by Non-collegiate Organizations and the Armed Forces

SUNY Cortland observes the recommendations of the American Council on Education's Office on Educational Credit and of the University of the State of New York's Program in Non-collegiate Sponsored Instruction in the evaluation of educational experiences sponsored by Non-collegiate organizations and the military when the content is considered appropriate as transfer credit.

Credit for and/or waiver of courses or programs taken under the auspices of a non-collegiate organization or the armed forces may be granted by the school dean of the student's major with the consultation of the appropriate department chair.

410.05 GENERAL EDUCATION

SUNY Cortland General Education

The purpose of General Education is to provide students with an intellectual and cultural basis for their development as informed individuals in our society. This requires that they understand the ideas that have formed our own civilization, that they appreciate other cultures and that they have knowledge of the fundamental principles that govern the physical universe. All students must complete the Cortland General Education Program requirements by taking one course in each of the categories listed below, with the exception of the natural sciences category in which they must take two courses.

Identifying courses that meet requirements

Students should refer to the General Education section of the registrar’s website for a current and full listing of SUNY Cortland’s courses that fulfill General Education categories. Students should refer to the search-by-attribute feature of the online Course Schedule for a listing of General Education courses offered within a particular semester.

Cortland General Education

The Cortland General Education Program fulfills all SUNY General Education requirements and includes additional elements specific to the Cortland degree. Students will take one course in each of the categories listed below with the exception of:

a) natural sciences in which they must take two courses,
b) foreign language where the requirement depends on the degree program, and
c) basic communication in which they must complete both academic writing and presentation skills areas.

Double counting, or the use of a single course to satisfy more than one category, is allowed but is subject to the following limitations:

a) no course used by an individual student to satisfy the humanities category may be used to satisfy another subject category, and
b) no single course may in any case be used to satisfy more than two General Education categories. Students may not take more than two courses in any one discipline to satisfy the requirements of the Cortland General Education Program.  Students should refer to the registrar’s website under All-College Requirements for detailed information regarding Cortland General Education Program. A full list of General Education requirements across SUNY is available at www.suny.edu/provost/generaleducation/courselist/mastercampuslist.cfm.

Cortland General Education Learning Outcome Categories
  1. Quantitative Skills
  2. Natural Sciences (two courses, see Category 13)
  3. Social Science
  4. United States History and Society
  5. Western Civilization
  6. Contrasting Cultures
  7. Humanities
  8. The Arts
  9. Foreign Language (refer to degree program)
  10. Basic Communication
    Academic Writing and 
    Presentation Skills
  11. Prejudice and Discrimination
  12. Science, Technology, Values and Society
  13. Natural Sciences (second of two courses)
Transfer Courses

Any approved SUNY General Education course taken at another institution will be accepted into the related Cortland General Education category. Courses from non-SUNY institutions and courses for Cortland Category 11, Prejudice and Discrimination, and Category 12, Science, Technology, Values and Society, also may be transferred, providing they meet the learning outcomes of these categories. Natural sciences courses that provide a survey of a traditional discipline with a laboratory will be accepted into Category 2A; all others will be accepted into Category 2B.

At the time of initial entry to SUNY Cortland, transfer students will be granted up to three waivers that can be applied toward meeting the requirements in Category 11, Category 12 and one of the Natural Science course requirements reflected in Category 13. Waivers will be granted based only on transfer credit posted. Transfer students criteria:

  1. Students entering Cortland with 20-34.5 credit hours will be eligible for one waiver.
  2. Students entering Cortland with 35-49.5 credit hours will be eligible for two waivers.
  3. Students entering Cortland with 50 or more credit hours will be eligible for three waivers.

410.06 COLLEGE CREDIT HOUR SYSTEM

The basic unit of credit in college courses is the credit hour, one hour of credit for a 16-week semester. Students are expected to study a minimum of three hours outside of class for each credit hour. Thus a student should plan on a 45-hour study week for an academic load of 15 credit hours.

The full-time undergraduate student semester credit hour load varies from 12 to 18 hours a semester, depending on the program. Credit workloads in excess of 18 credit hours must be approved by the associate dean of the school of the student’s major. 

410.07 CHANGE OF UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR

Change of Major

Qualified students who meet the academic criteria published in the College Catalog may apply for a new major. In addition to establishing academic criteria, such as grade point averages and standards to be met in prerequisite courses, some departments limit acceptances. Students who do not meet the criteria or who are not accepted due to a limited number of openings must select another major. Caution: Students remaining on a waiting list or as pre-majors after their sophomore year will jeopardize their eligibility for financial aid and potentially their time to degree completion.

Undergraduate Change of Major forms are available on the Web or in department offices and require the signed approval of the accepting department chair. Students should file all change of major forms in the department of the new major before the established deadline each semester — October and March — to ensure the ability to register for courses in the new major during the registration period.

Changes in Degree Requirements

While the curriculum at Cortland undergoes frequent review and new courses are established, students are assured that requirements for graduation at the time of initial enrollment will remain unchanged for those who complete their undergraduate programs within the same major without interruption. A change of major, the addition of a new minor or concentration may result in a change of catalog term and additional required course work for the new major and/or the need to meet certain grade point criteria as determined by the new department’s published requirements at the time of the change of major. An official leave of absence is not considered an interruption of enrollment.

The College reserves the right to change the College calendar, fees and requirements other than those for degrees. Such changes become effective when adopted.

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410.08 ELIGIBILITY FOR STUDENT TEACHING AND FIELDWORK

To be eligible for student teaching, fieldwork, cooperative programs, internships or recreation education practica, undergraduate students must have at least a 2.5 minimum cumulative quality point average for most programs, have no incompletes on their record and not be on any form of probation. Graduate students must have at least a 3.0 cumulative quality point average, have no incompletes and not be on any form of probation. Certain programs (in the School of Professional Studies, School of Education, adolescence English, adolescence foreign language, adolescence mathematics, adolescence sciences and adolescence social studies) have additional eligibility requirements, which are fully explained under appropriate department sections of the Undergraduate Catalog or the Graduate Catalog.

Students may not be enrolled in any course work (at Cortland or any other institution) nor participate in any College-related activities while engaged in student teaching or fieldwork.

410.09 AUDITING COURSES

Auditing of courses is subject to the following conditions:

  1. Auditors shall be accepted into classes only with the consent of the instructor of record and will be denied admission to classes that have reached the maximum number of students.
  2. Course auditors normally will not be charged any tuition, but will pay all laboratory and course-related fees and any other charges connected with a course.
  3. Course auditors will not be enrolled or listed on an official class roster. They will attend without credit or formal recognition. They do not need to meet the requirements of the course.
  4. Course auditors may not subsequently request credit for the course even if they complete the course requirements.

Effective Sept. 1, 1974, Chapter 1002 of the Session Laws of New York 1974 amends sections 355 and 6303 of the Education Law to permit persons 60 years of age and older to enroll in courses at colleges in State University of New York without tuition, examination, grading, or credit. The permission to enroll is on a space available basis as determined by the president of the College involved and provided that such audit attendance will not interfere with the attendance of otherwise qualified students.

410.10 ACADEMIC CREDIT FROM OTHER COLLEGES

A. Advanced Standing

Only course work satisfactorily completed at regionally accredited collegiate institutions will be accepted. Usually credit is allowed only
for those courses in which a grade of “C-” or better has been earned. However, credit may be granted for “D” grades if the student has received an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.) or any bachelor’s degree at the time of first admission to SUNY Cortland. Grades of Pass “P” and Satisfactory “S” awarded at another institution may be accepted at the discretion of the associate dean of the school of the student’s major at the initial point of matriculation. The associate deans will have the opportunity to:

  • decline to accept the course,
  • waive a requirement on the basis of a Pass “P” and Satisfactory “S” grade without granting course credit,
  • allow the course to count as its equivalent at Cortland in the case of activity/participation courses,
  • award credit under the General Elective (GEN) or Liberal Arts (LASR) labels.

All credits accepted for transfer must have been earned at institutions granted regional accreditation by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), e.g., the Middle States Association, Southern Association, North Central Association, New England Association, Northwest Association, or Western Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges.

While credits are transferable, grades earned at other colleges are not calculated in the Cortland grade point average. Grade point averages that qualify students for honors and recognition at Commencement are based exclusively upon institutional course work at Cortland.

Students entering SUNY Cortland with an A.A. or A.S. will, in most instances, be able to complete requirements for a bachelor’s degree with an additional 60 to 64 credit hours of course work. Students pursuing professional degree programs, such as those leading to teacher certification, may need additional courses to fulfill requirements over and above the minimum needed to earn a Cortland bachelor’s degree. Requirements for the bachelor’s degree are listed in the Degree Requirements section of the undergraduate catalog.

B. Credit From Other Colleges

SUNY Cortland students must complete at least 45 credit hours for the degree at SUNY Cortland to meet the College’s residency requirement. In addition, one half the credit hours for the major, minor and/or concentration must be completed at SUNY Cortland. Students matriculated at the College can receive credit for course work taken at other colleges if they receive prior approval from the appropriate associate dean. Cortland transfer students may receive up to 64 credit hours of transfer credit from two-year colleges. This maximum credit hour total includes any 100- or 200- level courses, Advanced Placement, College Level Examination Program, College Proficiency or International Baccalaureate credits.

Only course work satisfactorily completed at regionally accredited collegiate institutions will be accepted. Usually credit is allowed only for those courses in which a grade of C- or better has been earned. However, credit may be granted for D grades if the student has received an associate of arts (A.A.), associate of science (A.S.) or any bachelor’s degree at the time of first admission to SUNY Cortland. Transfer students from four-year colleges or universities may receive additional credit hours toward degree requirements at Cortland. The maximum number of credit hours accepted ranges from 75-83, depending on the number required for graduation in the chosen program.

Grades of Pass (P) and Satisfactory S awarded at another institution may be accepted at the discretion of the associate dean of the school of the student’s major at the initial point of matriculation. The associate dean will have the opportunity to:

  • decline to accept the course,
  • waive a requirement on the basis of a Pass (P) and Satisfactory (S) grade without granting course credit,
  • allow the course to count as its equivalent at Cortland in the case of activity/participation courses,
  • award credit under the General Elective (GEN) or Liberal Arts (LAS) labels.

All credit hours accepted for transfer must have been earned at institutions granted regional accreditation by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), e.g., the Middle States Association, Southern Association, North Central Association, New England Association, Northwest Association, or Western Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges.

While credit hours are transferable, grades earned at other colleges are not calculated in the Cortland grade point average. Grade point averages that qualify students for honors and recognition at Commencement are based exclusively on course work at Cortland.

Students entering SUNY Cortland with an A.A. or A.S. will, in most instances, be able to complete requirements for a bachelor’s degree with an additional 60-64 credit hours of course work. Students pursuing professional degree programs, such as those leading to teacher certification, may need additional courses to fulfill requirements over and above the minimum needed to earn a Cortland bachelor’s degree. Requirements for the bachelor’s degree are listed in the Degree Requirements section of the College catalog.

Any school of the College may designate special requirements that may not be taken elsewhere.

410.11 CLASS ATTENDANCE FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY

A. Students (Endorsed by the Faculty Senate, Feb. 27, 1990 and approved by President Clark, March 28, 1990)

New York's State Education Law, as amended, provides that "no person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he is unable, because of religious beliefs, to attend classes or participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days."

Students who drop out of college without officially withdrawing are severing ties to the College and must accept the academic penalties for their actions. If there is an intent to return to the College, a student must go through the readmission process.

B. Faculty

Faculty members are required to meet their classes as scheduled by their department unless permission to change meeting times has been granted by the school dean, after consultation with the department chair and with the Registrar's Office. Approval of a request to change a course meeting time requires that:
1. Students enrolled in the course have no conflicts with any other scheduled course including laboratory or performance courses.
2. Students are not subjected to extreme inconvenience by the time change.

C. Class Attendance 

It is the policy of the College that regular class attendance is a basic requirement of all courses. Class attendance is a strong predictor of student success in college. The policy does permit class attendance, participation and/or performance as a factor in determining course grades.

The taking of attendance and attendance requirements are at the discretion of the individual instructor, subject to the following two provisions:

  • Penalties for excessive absences, as determined by the instructor’s policy, shall not exceed one-third of a letter grade per class hour of absence.
  • Absences due to participation in approved College activities shall be considered valid absences. The provost and vice president for academic affairs shall determine what College activities are approved as valid for students to be absent from classes.

In determining the student’s grade, instructors will weigh the student's performance and may also consider any excessive absences. Instructors should make clear to their classes what they consider to be valid reasons for missing class and what penalties will be assessed for excessive absences. Instructors shall state in the course syllabus, and emphasize to the class at the first meeting, the attendance requirement for the course.

Students are responsible for all work missed. Instructors shall establish procedures to allow students who have been absent for valid reasons to make up missed class work. If students anticipate having to miss class, it is their responsibility to inform the instructor ahead of time.

Nonattendance does not mean a student has dropped or withdrawn from a course. Students who have not attended class and have not officially dropped or withdrawn from the course will receive a grade of E.

410.12 REPORTING ABSENCES AND ILLNESS

If students are unable to attend class because of emergencies such as surgery, accidents involving lengthy absences from classes or extenuating circumstances, they should notify the associate dean of the school in which they are majoring. The associate dean will request documentation regarding the emergency; upon receipt of sufficient documentation the associate dean will notify instructors about the reason for the absence. The instructor has the final determination in how such absences will be considered.

Student Obligations: Length of Semester

Students are expected to attend classes throughout the semester and complete final exams. Classes and examinations are scheduled according to the academic calendar that is adopted by the College each year. The fall semester usually begins late in August or early in September and ends in the third week of December. The spring semester usually begins in mid- to late-January and ends in the third or fourth week of May.

Missing a Final Exam

Students who miss a final examination will receive a grade of E for that course unless they obtain an excuse for their absence from the associate dean of their school.

Religious Beliefs and Class Attendance

Section 224-a of the New York State Education Law reads as follows:

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to register or attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If registration, classes, examinations, study or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements or opportunity to register shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements or registration held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his or her availing himself or herself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student, who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section, shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his or her rights under this section.
    6-a. It shall be the responsibility of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to give written notice to students of their rights under this section, informing them that each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, must be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to such student such equivalent opportunity.
  7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean any institution of higher education, recognized and approved by the regents of the university of the state of New York, which provides a course of study leading to the granting of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Such term shall not include any institution which is operated, supervised or controlled by a church or by a religious or denominational organization whose educational programs are principally designed for the purpose of training ministers or other religious functionaries or for the purpose of propagating religious doctrines. As used in this section, the term “religious belief ” shall mean beliefs associated with any corporation organized and operated exclusively for religious purposes, which is not disqualified for tax exemption under section 501 of the United States Code. 

Schedule Changes

Students wishing to make adjustments to their academic class schedule may do so during the official College drop/add period, the first full week of each semester. Classes may be dropped and added without penalty during this period only. Second- and fourth-quarter courses have a designated drop/add period in October and March, respectively. Students should refer to the College calendar and the registrar's website for specific dates.

Students who do not attend a class are not dropped automatically and will receive a grade of E.

All drop/add transactions made after the official drop/add period are subject to late fees. After the official drop/add period students must withdraw from a class and file an Official Withdrawal from Course Form that must have the approval of the respective associate dean.

410.13 REPORTING A DEATH OF A STUDENT OR OF A PARENT

When notified of the death of a student or a student's parent, the vice president for student affairs will take the responsibility for notifying the president, the provost and vice president for academic affairs, and the school dean as appropriate.

410.14 COURSE SCHEDULE CHANGES

Students wishing to make adjustments to their academic class schedule may do so during the official College drop/add period, the first full week of each semester. Classes may be dropped and added without penalty during this period only. Second- and fourth-quarter courses have a designated two-day drop/add period in October and March, respectively. Refer to the College calendar and the registrar’s dates and deadlines for specific dates.

Students who do not attend a class are not dropped automatically and will receive a grade of E.

All drop/add transactions made after the official drop/add period are subject to late fees. After the official drop/add period, students must withdraw from a class and file an Official Withdrawal from Course Form that must have the approval of the respective associate dean.

410.15 REGISTRATION

Information about the procedures to be followed for registration are made available each semester by the registrar, Advisement and Transition and the Graduate Admissions Office.

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CHAPTER 415: General Academic Policies and Regulations

415.01 GRADING SYSTEM

A. Letter Grading

SUNY Cortland employs the plus and minus grading system with the following basic classifications: A indicates superior performance, B indicates good performance, C indicates fair performance, D indicates minimally acceptable performance, and E indicates failure of a course. The grade D- is the lowest grade for which College undergraduate credit is awarded.

A letter grade of A+ through E is employed when both of the following criteria are met:

  1. the performance of each student is monitored and evaluated by the instructor with some specific measure of each student's cognitive achievement;
  2. the nature of the course and the measure(s) of student achievement employed lend themselves to the full range of grades (A+ through E).
B. Alternative Grading System
  1. SUNY Cortland has an alternative grading system, S for Satisfactory and U for Unsatisfactory. Satisfactory indicates meeting minimum criteria for passing the course, while Unsatisfactory indicates failure to meet minimum criteria for passing the course.
    Normally, grades S and U will constitute the alternative grading system. However, additionally with approval from appropriate curriculum committees, departments may use an H for Honors to indicate an exceptional level of achievement in designated courses. This H, S, and U alternative grading system is used for courses that do not satisfy both criteria 'a' and 'b' above.
    Honors, Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory grades are entered on the student's transcript but are not used in computing grade point averages.
    Each department will designate, subject to approval of the school curriculum committee and the school dean, which courses are appropriate for Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory and, where appropriate, the Honors designation. Such designations will appear in the College Catalog and the Graduate Catalog.
    (Approved by the Faculty Senate, April 8, 1986 and by President Clark, April 21, 1986)
  2. Incomplete (INC)
    INC indicates that the student has not completed the course and that a grade is being withheld until the work is performed and approved. The INC automatically will change to an E for undergraduate students unless the incomplete is converted to regular letter grade by the end of the last day of classes of the following semester. Graduate students have one calendar year to convert an INC to a regular letter grade. It is the student's responsibility to complete the required work. Exceptions may be granted only upon written petition to the instructor and the dean of the school in which the course is offered. On setting time periods for finishing the incomplete, the instructor must give the student adequate time for finishing the course. Factors to be considered should include deadlines for making up other incompletes and the student's schedule in the semester the incomplete is to be made up. The associate dean should consult with the instructor involved before granting an extension of an incomplete. (Please see the academic policies sections of the undergraduate and graduate catalogs for more information.)
  3. Withdrawal from a Course After Official Change of Schedule Period
    College policy: The letter X indicates official withdrawal from a College course without academic penalty. Grades of X will not be awarded for courses that are dropped during the official drop and add period, the first three days of the semester for semester courses or before the second class meeting of modular or quarter courses.
    Students are not allowed to withdraw from classes the last three weeks of semester courses (after Nov. 15 in the fall and April 15 in the spring) or the last week of quarter or modular courses. Due to fluctuating dates, withdrawal deadlines for Summer and Winter Sessions will be established prior to the term.
    Note: A student who has been found in violation of the academic dishonesty code loses the opportunity to withdraw from the course in which the violation occurred.
    Impact of X Grades on Financial Aid: Grades of X are considered attempted but not completed for the purpose of calculating Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for Financial Aid Eligibility. The policies regarding SAP for State and Federal Financial Aid are detailed in this catalog. The most common financial aid impact from course withdrawal in a single semester is a loss of TAP eligibility for the following semester. However, a pattern of withdrawal and/or failure across more than one semester may result in the loss of ALL future aid eligibility, including student loans. It is strongly recommended that students consult with their financial aid advisor if withdrawal will reduce their total completed credit hours for the current semester to less than 12.
C. Pass/No Credit Option

Undergraduate Students: Juniors and seniors in good academic standing may elect to take certain courses on a Pass/No Credit basis with the approval of the student's department chair under the following conditions:

Courses shall be outside the student's major and minor requirements and concentration.
Courses for General Education requirements or all-college requirements cannot be taken for Pass/No Credit (P/NC).
Language requirements for the B.A. or B.S. degree cannot be met with courses taken for Pass/No Credit.
No 500-level course taken for graduate credit or may be taken with the Pass/No Credit.
The student may take no more than one course per semester under the option without special approval from the student's dean.
The student's advisor shall discuss the option with the student and make a recommendation to the department chair as to whether or not the request meets the rationale for the option.

  1. A written request for approval of the option must be submitted to the student's department chair before the end of the formal drop and add period.
  2. Students must renew their requests each semester to be eligible.
  3. If approved, the program is binding on the student and cannot be reversed after the end of the drop and add period.
  4. The approved request is sent to the registrar. Instructors are not informed that a student has been granted the option.
  5. Upon receipt of the formal grade sheets, the registrar will convert the grade to P or NC. This notation is placed on the student's official transcript. No other record is kept by the registrar.
  6. No quality points will be awarded for courses completed under the option.
  7. Pass/No Credit courses shall enter in no way into evaluation of academic probation or dismissal or readmission.
  8. Departments may set limits in addition to those listed heretofore but they cannot waive existing limitations.

Graduate Students: Courses taken on a Pass/No Credit basis may not be applied to a SUNY Cortland graduate degree or certificate program. Non-matriculated students may take graduate courses for which they are qualified on a Pass/No Credit basis. However, courses taken on a Pass/No Credit basis may not be applied later toward a SUNY Cortland degree or certificate program. Matriculated students may not undertake any course applicable to a Cortland degree or certificate program on a Pass/No Credit basis. Only work of C quality or better qualifies as a passing grade and students must complete all required work for the course.

415.02 QUALITY POINTS/GRADE POINT AVERAGE

A student's level of scholarship is determined by the following system of quality points per semester hour of credit:

A+ = 4.3 A = 4.0 A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3 B = 3.0 B- = 2.7
C+ = 2.3 C = 2.0 C- = 1.7
D+ = 1.3 D = 1.0 D- = .7
E  = 0.0    

Grade point averages are determined by dividing the total number of quality points by the total number of credit hours for which a student has been graded. For example, a grade of C in a three-credit-hour course is equivalent to six quality points. If a student completes 17 credit hours of course work and accumulates 38 quality points, the grade point average will be 2.235. Although it is possible to attain a 4.3 grade point average, the College considers the method a 4.0 grading system.

In courses where grades are listed as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory or Pass/No Credit neither grade is used in determining the student’s grade point average. A Satisfactory or Pass grade is credited toward graduation, however.

415.03 EXAMINATION POLICIES

Final examinations are required. An instructor may request exception to this policy from the department chair. The chair may grant such request if: (1) the nature of the course makes such action desirable; or (2) an adequate series of other evaluation procedures is substituted. An instructor may have a policy of exempting students who meet specified criteria from final examinations: the policy and criteria shall be stated and placed on file with the department chair.

Final examinations or last examinations of the course are given during final examination week (except for examinations in quarter courses, which end in the middle of the semester.) No examinations, quizzes, or tests of any type should be given during the last week of classes prior to the published final examination week. Any deviation from this policy must be approved in advance by the appropriate department chair and school dean.

(Approved by the Faculty Senate, Feb. 11, 1977; subsequently approved by Vice President Corey)

A copy of all final examinations shall be kept on file in the department chair's office for a period of three years. After three years the examinations shall be returned to the appropriate staff members.

Each instructor, after receiving approval of his/her examination policy from his/her chair, shall inform each class of the course requirements and grading procedures by the end of the first full week of classes. Persons in the class shall be informed of policies on:

  1. examinations and other evaluation procedures
  2. exemption from examinations
  3. make-up of examinations

All such policies shall reflect current college policy.

A student may request an adjustment in his/her final examination schedule if

  • there is a conflict in his/her examination schedule
  • the student is scheduled for more than two examinations in any one day
  • the student has a verified illness or other emergency.

Requests for adjustment shall follow procedures established and published by the Registrar. No make-ups for final exams shall be given except for students who are officially excused or who have been verifiably excused by a physician.

The student shall have the right to appeal decisions resulting from these policies to the chair of the department, the associate dean of the school or the provost.

(Approved by the Executive Council, April 11, 1972)

415.04 MISSED FINAL EXAMINATION, MAKE-UP EXAMINATION

Students who miss a final examination will receive a grade of E for that course unless they obtain excuses for their absence from their school deans. It is the student's responsibility to arrange with the instructor for a make-up examination. Such a make-up examination must be taken after the regularly scheduled examination and will be given at the convenience of the instructor.

415.05 REPORTING OF GRADES

  1. At both the mid-semester point and again at the end of the semester, students may access and review their estimates and/or final grades on the Web. Students are also notified when they are placed on academic probation.
  2. A change of grade due to instructor error or student appeal must be submitted by the end of the following semester. Grade changes submitted a semester after the initial semester in which the grade was issued will not be accepted. Once a student’s degree is conferred, the academic record cannot be altered and no further grade adjustments will be made.

415.06 RETAKING OF COURSES

When a student retakes a Cortland course, all grades received will remain on the official transcript, but only the last grade received will be included in the quality and grade point average and hours toward graduation.

The grade excluded from the cumulative totals will be annotated with an E on the transcript. The grade included in the cumulative totals will be annotated with an I. The retaken course, which is defined by the same title, course prefix and course number, must be repeated at SUNY Cortland under the same grading system in order to be eligible for this policy. Therefore, courses previously taken and earned as transfer credit are not eligible to be retaken.

To retake a course, a student must seek registration access from the academic department offering the course. A student may retake any course one time. Departments may restrict registration access for subsequent retakes of the same course. See departmental sections of the College Catalog for information on department specific retake restrictions and/or requirements.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum on June 10, 2013) 

415.07 PROCEDURES CONCERNING GRADE INFLATION

  1. Grade point averages by faculty member, course and department shall be regularly computed. These data shall be collected each semester and shall be made available as soon as possible to the faculty member involved, to the department chairperson involved, to the appropriate school dean and to the provost and vice president for academic affairs.
  2. Each department chairperson shall be responsible for encouraging departmental seminars on grading, opening opportunities to peruse grading patterns in the department, and promoting the development of common grading standards for multiple sections of courses — where feasible.
  3. The department chair shall be responsible for reviewing grading patterns of faculty members in the department; unusual grading practices shall be justified on the basis of academic considerations, e.g., mastery learning, competency-based education, etc. The chair shall remind faculty members periodically of the way grades are defined in the current catalog and that average performance is equivalent to the letter grade of C.
  4. The school deans and the provost and vice president for academic affairs shall be responsible for monitoring grading patterns within schools and across the College.

415.08 DEAN'S LIST

Dean's List, the highest ranking for undergraduate students in their respective academic areas of the College, is earned with a 3.3 semester grade point average. In addition to the 3.3 grade point average, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. be enrolled in a full-time 12 credit hour course load;
  2. at least eight of the 12 credit hours must be taken for standard letter grade,
  3. receive no Incomplete grades for the semester. Dean’s List designees are named at the end of each semester.

415.09 PRESIDENT'S LIST

  1. President’s List is a College-wide honor given to students based on their academic performance for each semester. Students who achieve grades of A - or better in each of their courses for a given semester will be designated a member of the President’s List. In addition to achieving the stipulated grades, students must meet the following criteria:
  2. be enrolled as a full-time student with a minimum of 12 credit hours;
  3. at least eight of the 12 credit hours must be taken for a standard letter grade;
  4. have no grades lower than Satisfactory in courses being taken for other than a standard letter grade;
  5. receive no Incomplete grades for the semester. President’s List designees are named at the end of each semester.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum, Dec. 30, 2003)

415.10 PART-TIME STUDENT AWARD FOR ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

The Part-time Student Award for Academic Achievement recognizes academic excellence among part-time undergraduate students. To earn this award, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. have earned at least 12 credit hours of cumulative standard grade course work at SUNY Cortland;
  2. have a 3.3 cumulative grade point average;
  3. have a 3.3 semester grade point average;
  4. be enrolled at part-time status throughout the semester, with a minimum of three credits of standard letter grade;
  5. receive no Incomplete grades for the semester. Part-time Student Award for Academic Achievement designees are named at the end of each semester.

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415.11 ACADEMIC STANDARDS, GOOD ACADEMIC STANDING, PROBATION AND DISMISSAL

1. Statement of “Good Academic Standing”

“Good Academic Standing” for academic considerations means that the student is meeting the academic standards as defined by grade point average and is making satisfactory progress toward the degree. The mechanism of academic probation, including any accompanying constraints upon a student's activities, is intended merely as an educational device designed to encourage greater effort on the part of students who appear to be having difficulty in meeting certain academic standards. Placement on academic probation may precede denial of the right to register for academic course work if certain conditions are not met.

Any question concerning whether or not an individual student is in good academic standing will be determined by the school associate dean.

2. Financial Aid “Good Academic Standing”

Both the State of New York and U.S. Department of Education require periodic measurement of a student’s academic progress to determine eligibility for future financial aid. Since the state and federal criteria differ from each other, and since these two sets of criteria also differ from the College's definition of “good academic standing,” it is necessary to have separate and distinct academic standards for continued eligibility for financial aid. These standards are listed in some detail in the undergraduate catalog and the graduate Catalog.

Because these sets of standards are fundamentally different and because the financial aid standards are applicable only to aid recipients, the Financial Aid Office is responsible for calculation, notification and enforcement of the financial aid academic standards. The Financial Aid Office also recruits and maintains a committee to hear appeals from students with exceptional or unusual mitigating circumstances. Members of the Financial Aid Office professional staff shall represent a minority of that committee.

The actions of the Financial Aid Office and the Appeals Committee on Academic Eligibility for Financial Aid are independent of any actions taken by the academic offices, the deans and the associate deans. Financial aid recipients should always be advised to consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to taking actions (such as withdrawals or course incompletes) which may have an effect on their aid eligibility.

3. The College Policy on Academic Standards

SUNY Cortland’s academic standards policy is dependent upon the student’s grade point average achievement in each semester – semester by semester – rather than a cumulative grade point average. The same standards apply to all undergraduates except those designated as Education Opportunity Program (EOP) students.

Levels of academic standing

A. Academic Probation: All SUNY Cortland students with a cumulative grade point average between 1.01 and 1.99 will be placed on academic probation. They will receive a notice of academic probation from the associate dean of their school along with an academic contract notifying them of the semester grade point average needed to regain good academic standing of 2.00 cumulative grade point average, limiting their course load to no more than 15 credit hours and providing other recommendations.

Students on academic probation will be advised to curtail any activity that is detrimental to regaining good academic standing (e.g. on and off-campus employment, fraternity/sorority, resident assistant activities).
SUNY Cortland students whose semester grade point average is less than 1.01 but whose cumulative grade point average is greater than 2.00 will be placed on academic warning and advised to improve their academic performance.

B. Academic Suspension: Students who fail to meet their academic contract will be subject to academic suspension. Suspension mandates a minimum of two semesters away from campus (summer course work may be counted toward meeting one semester of the two-semester requirement). During that time, students are required to take full-time course work at another accredited college earning an overall 2.75 or higher grade point average, or be employed full time with an excellent employment record, or have an honorable record of military service.

Students whose semester grade point average is less than 1.01 will be automatically suspended. Students placed on academic suspension have the right of appeal to the Academic Standing Committee. Students who are reinstated after appeal or upon return from suspension will be placed on academic probation with an academic contract.

First-semester freshmen and first-semester transfer students with a cumulative grade point average of less than 1.01 will be automatically suspended but will be eligible for expedited appeal through their respective associate dean. Those students reinstated following expedited appeal of suspension will be placed on academic probation with an academic contract. They must meet expectations outlined above for students on probation.

C. Academic Dismissal: Students who are reinstated following academic suspension and fail to meet their academic contract will be subject to academic dismissal, with the right of appeal to the Academic Standing Committee. Students who are academically dismissed are ineligible to apply for readmission for a minimum of three years.

Note: Any academic contract, whether signed by the student or not, will be in effect for the term in question and will supersede other probation and suspension policies. Grounds for appeal will be mitigating circumstances such as death in the family, injury or illness requiring hospitalization and other special circumstances.

Academic contracts are targeted for students to achieve good academic standing (2.00 cumulative grade point average). Attaining this grade point average, however, may not be sufficient to allow entry into some majors. Students should check with their department for specific cumulative grade point average entry requirements.

Full-time students are permitted a maximum of one and one half times the normal length of time to complete their degree for financial aid purposes. For students attending on less than a full-time basis, the scale will be adjusted accordingly. Any student who is not in good academic standing should always check with the Financial Aid Office to determine their individual financial status. (See the financial aid section of the the College Catalog for an explanation of financial aid implications.)

An Academic Standing Committee will consider student appeals to academic suspension and dismissal. Since granting of an appeal is not automatic, it is intended only to accommodate extraordinary or unusual situations. The committee will convene in January, May and August of each academic year to consider student appeals and review pertinent documentation of mitigating circumstances provided by the student. The student must also provide the committee with a written plan for achieving academic success.

Decisions of the Academic Standing Committee are final. If the Academic Standing Committee grants the appeal, the student will be allowed to return for the next semester on academic probation. Students are only eligible for one appeal as an undergraduate student.

Graduate Students: For graduate students, SUNY Cortland's probation-dismissal policy is dependent upon the student's cumulative grade point average (GPA). The same probation-dismissal standards apply to all graduate students, regardless of their financial aid status:

Students enrolled in a master's degree or certificate of advanced study program are required to maintain a minimum 2.80 cumulative grade point average in graduate work. Students whose cumulative grade point average remains below 2.80 for two consecutive terms of enrollment may be dismissed from the College.

A graduate student subject to academic dismissal may appeal to the school associate dean if there are mitigating circumstances. A further appeal may be directed to the provost and vice president for academic affairs.

415.12 ACADEMIC PROBATION POLICY

Although scholarship is the primary obligation for the College and the student, the SUNY Cortland faculty recognizes and endorses the enriching experience gained through participation in campus organizations and activities. These are universally accepted as part of higher education. Thus the College does not deny students placed on academic probation the educational and vocational benefits derived from non-classroom activities.

Students on probation are urged to improve their standing through tutorial help, remedial reading programs, study and writing courses, and student-sponsored living center programs for intellectual advancement.

415.13 CLASS YEAR DETERMINATION

Undergraduate students are identified by class year in accordance with the number of semester hours of credit earned toward graduation as follows:

Freshman 0-25.5 credit hours
Sophomore 26-56 credit hours
Junior 56.5 - 89.5 credit hours
Senior 90 or more credit hour

Students are reminded, however, that ordinarily they are expected to register for a full load of courses each semester and that normal semester loads differ from one curriculum to another.

415.14 READMISSION

Candidates matriculated for undergraduate degrees who interrupt their education at SUNY Cortland and later wish to return must formally apply to be readmitted. An official leave of absence is not considered an interruption in enrollment. A student who has applied to graduate and has not completed degree requirements, and fails to register for a full calendar year from the end of the last semester of enrollment, must seek readmission before returning to classes at Cortland, or seeking graduation from Cortland.

Readmitted students re-enter SUNY Cortland under the catalog at the time of readmission and are, therefore, responsible for all College requirements, including the Cortland General Education requirements, SUNY and NYSED requirements, and all other major requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Students readmitted to Cortland are not eligible to waive additional general education requirements. Appeals concerning readmission questions can be made to the appropriate dean.

Students who have been dismissed for academic reasons ordinarily will not be eligible for readmission until at least three years have passed since their dismissal. Previous academic achievement at the College, grades received for college work completed elsewhere, and the circumstances under which the student left Cortland are all considered in the readmissions process. Also considered may be length of time away from Cortland, military service, and/or employment experience.

A condition of readmission may be “successful academic performance” — 2.75 cumulative grade point average — at another regionally accredited institution. Transcripts from other institutions attended must be included with the readmission application. 

415.15 ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM (EOP) STUDENTS

Grade Point Requirements

 

Automatically on Probation

Subject to Dismissal

Semester I

Below 1.50 Below 1.00

Semester II

Below 1.75 Below 1.50

Semester III

Below 2.00 Below 1.75

Semester IV

  Below 2.00

Semester V

   
Services Available to EOP Students

The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) makes available academic and personal counseling to students. The program provides an intensive and comprehensive tutorial program utilizing peer and professional tutors. The above services are in addition to services available through the College Counseling Center, the ASAP Program and other offices.

Advisement

EOP students will be advised by program counselors for their first registration at the College. All subsequent advisement and registration will be conducted by (a) departmental advisors for students who have declared a major or (b) EOP counselors for students who have not declared a major.

Probation and Dismissal Procedure

1. Progress reports are presented to the director throughout the semester from:

  1. Tutorial Services (includes class attendance and other relevant information)
  2. Educational Opportunity Program Counselors
  3. Midterm grade assessments

2. Director of Programs

  1. Will compile and assess reports regarding student progress
  2. Provide appropriate associate dean with pertinent information prior to probation or dismissal decisions.

3. Appeals

Students who are dismissed for academic ineligibility or who are required to attend summer school may appeal such decisions to the dean of their school.

415.16 WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE

Students withdrawing from the College will be assigned a grade of W in all courses in which students are enrolled. It is the student's responsibility to officially clear all records and obligations to receive official separation. The official withdrawal form and procedures for filing may be obtained from the associate dean in the school of the student's major.

Students who decide not to return to Cortland are responsible for notifying the Registrar's Office in writing to avoid tuition and fee liability problems and to release seats to fellow students. Students who withdraw from the College, or who fail to register, will be required to readmit before being allowed to register. If the College is in session, the withdrawal form should be completed with the associate dean. Failure to do so will delay any refunds the student may be eligible to receive

Students who have withdrawn after midterm or failed to register ordinarily will not be considered for readmission until a minimum of one full semester (fall, spring, summer) has passed.

415.17 EMERGENCY ADMINISTRATIVE WITHDRAWAL Policy (Medical)

Occasionally, a student's physical or emotional condition may interfere with his or her educational progress and may be disruptive to classroom or out-of-class environments. The College maintains a Health Service and Counseling Center to attend to the short-term medical and psychological needs of students. Students whose needs extend beyond the response capabilities of these campus services will be referred to off-campus facilities when appropriate and available. However, a student who cannot adequately be helped by available resources and whose medical or psychological condition, in the judgment of the College's professional staff, renders him or her unable to function at the College, may be required to withdraw from the College. The vice president for student affairs will inform the president of such occurrences. The procedures are on file in the Vice President for Student Affairs Office.

Procedure

A College faculty or staff member who encounters a student having physical or emotional difficulties beyond the ability of the staff member to handle shall normally refer the student to the College's Student Health Service or the Counseling Center as appropriate. The staff member may also inform the Vice President for Student Affairs' Office of the referral. Referral means suggesting to the student that he or she visit the appropriate referral center for assistance and may include a telephone call to that resource to provide appropriate background information.

  1. If the student accepts the referral, and in the judgment of the director of student development or designee, the student is unable to be adequately helped by either the Student Health or Counseling centers or by other available facilities and whose condition renders him or her unable to adequately function as a member of the campus community, the director shall notify the vice president for student affairs.
  2. If the student rejects the referral, and the physical or emotional difficulties continue to manifest themselves, the College staff member shall notify the appropriate Student Health Service or Counseling Center staff, University Police and the vice president for student affairs.
  3. If an extreme emergency exists such that the student places himself or herself or others in immediate threat or harm and, therefore, a referral would be appropriate, the College staff member shall immediately notify Public Safety and the vice president for student affairs.

When the vice president for student affairs receives notification in any of these three instances from the Student Development Center, the vice president may seek other professional opinions as deemed appropriate. Opinions sought may include, but are not limited to, those of an academic advisor or residence hall director or, in the case of graduate students, the graduate coordinator. If possible, the vice president will then confer with the student. The vice president, or designee, may consult with the student's parent, spouse, or guardian as needed. If, in the judgment of the vice president for student affairs, the student is unable to adequately function as a member of the College community and/or the student is seriously disrupting others' ability to function as members of this community, the vice president for student affairs may recommend to the student that he or she withdraw from the College for a specified period of time. If the student declines to withdraw from the College, the vice president may effect the initiation of disciplinary action against the student and may also invoke an interim suspension pending a formal hearing.

(Approved by President Clark, Feb. 23, 1994)

415.18 TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORD

Grades are reported to the Registrar’s Office, from which the official College transcript is issued. Effective Fall 2008, all enrolled students (undergraduate and graduate) will be charged a $5 per semester transcript fee. Any student enrolled at SUNY Cortland prior to Fall 2008 will be “grandfathered” as a former student and receive unlimited official transcripts as a “lifetime service.” Refer to the Registrar’s website for detailed information on how to request an official College transcript. Following degree conferral, all students receive an official College transcript that is mailed with the diploma after graduation. The College reserves the right to deny transcripts to any student who is delinquent in an obligation to the College.

415.19 STUDENT LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Leave of absence for a specific period of time may be granted to a student in good academic standing — not subject to academic suspension, dismissal or probation. A student applying for leave of absence must give a definite date for return to the College and must register within one academic year of the date of leaving the College.

A student not returning to register within a specific time will be classified as an official withdrawal.

Application for leave of absence must be made to the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled. To affect the current semester, the application must be made by the last day of classes.

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415.20 VOLUNTARY MEDICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL LEAVES

All students requesting a medical leave of absence or a medical withdrawal for documented medical reasons will have their paperwork processed through the Student Health Service. This process can be initiated by any Student Health Service clinician, but must be approved by the Student Health Service physician.

Students requesting a medical leave of absence or a medical withdrawal for psychological reasons may have their paperwork processed through the Counseling Center. This process can be initiated by any counselor, but must be approved by the director of counseling.

All students receiving a medical leave or a medical withdrawal will have the differences between these two options explained to them and will have a chance to ask questions regarding these options. Once a decision is made, students will be asked to sign a statement agreeing to the conditions, if any, of their leave or withdrawal.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, October 2010)

415.21 REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

While the curriculum at SUNY Cortland undergoes frequent review and new courses are established, undergraduate students are assured that requirements for graduation will remain unchanged for those who enroll in the College and complete their undergraduate programs without interruption. Graduate students are assured that requirements for graduation will remain unchanged for those who enroll in the College and complete their graduate program within five years of the first course completed. An official leave of absence is not considered an interruption of enrollment. A change of major or program may result in additional required course work for the new major or program and, for undergraduate students, the need to meet certain grade point criteria as determined by the new department's published requirements at the time of the change in major.

The College, of course, reserves the right to change the College calendar, fees and requirements, other than those for degrees. Such changes become effective when adopted.

All candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete a degree order card.

Degree/diploma order cards and other information are mailed to potential bachelor degree recipients with at least 75 credit hours toward the degree for the ensuing year in October. All candidates for the bachelor's degree should file their completed cards with the registrar by March 1 of the year in which the degree will be received. This applies to May, August, and December candidates. Those filing after the deadline may not be listed in the Commencement program and may experience other delays in receiving certificates, diplomas and verifications of graduation. Those completing Teacher Certification Programs must complete a New York State Certificate Application and pay all mandated fees.

All candidates for the master's degree or certificates of advanced study must complete a graduation application. Graduation applications and other information are mailed to potential master's degree recipients with at least 18 hours toward the degree for the ensuing year in October. All candidates for the master's degree should file their completed applications with the Registrar's Office by March 1 of the year in which the degree will be received. This applies to May, August and December candidates. Those filing after the deadline may not be listed in the Commencement program and may experience other delays in receiving certificates, diplomas and verifications of graduation. Those completing Teacher Certification Programs must complete a New York State Certificate Application and pay all mandated fees.

415.22 GRADUATION WITH HONORS

Honors at graduation are awarded students whose quality point average meets the following standards: summa cum laude, 3.75 and above; magna cum laude, 3.5 to 3.749; cum laude, 3.2 to 3.499. All such awards of honors must have the approval of the faculty. Transfer students must complete either the equivalent of two full academic years, including at least 40 quality point credit hours, or 45 quality point credit hours at SUNY Cortland to be eligible for honors at graduation.

415.23 HONORS CONVOCATION AWARDS

SUNY Cortland’s annual Honors Convocation is held for the express purpose of honoring academic excellence. Therefore, awards presented at the convocation should be limited to the most academically prestigious awards recognized by the College. The following guidelines should be followed in determining which awards to present at the convocation and in selecting student awardees:

  1. All awardees must have a minimum 3.0 overall GPA.
  2. All awards presented at the Honors Convocation must have academic excellence as their primary criterion.
  3. Co-winners will not be allowed, unless the award description/endowment currently stipulates that co-winners are permitted. The committee chair or co-chair should be contacted with questions.
  4. Departments and interdisciplinary programs with fewer than 200 majors are limited to a maximum of three awards (in addition to any awards for which a donor has stipulated that the award must be given at the Honors Convocation).
  5. Larger departments and interdisciplinary programs may present up to five awards (in addition to any awards for which a donor has stipulated that the award must be given at the Honors Convocation).
  6. Departments and interdisciplinary programs with more than one major that wish to present more awards than allowed according to the above enrollment guidelines may present a total number of awards equal to the number of majors they house.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum, Nov. 23, 2004)

415.24 RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION

The minimum requirements for a degree from this College will be 45 credit hours at Cortland. Special requirements within the 45 semester hours may be designated by each school of the College.

(Executive Council, Oct. 7, 1971)

415.25 HONORARY DEGREES

State University of New York Board of Trustees

(Issued June 1999)

The honorary doctorate degree is the highest form of recognition offered by the State University of New York to persons of exceptional distinction.

A. The Purposes of Honorary Degrees Awarded by the State University of New York

To recognize excellence in the fields of public affairs, the sciences, humanities and the arts, scholarship and education, business and philanthropy, and social services that exemplify the mission and purposes of the State University of New York;
To honor meritorious and outstanding service to the University, the State of New York, the United States or to humanity at large;
To recognize persons whose lives serve as examples of the University's aspirations for its students.

B. The Nature of the Honorary Degree

The Board of Trustees shall award all honorary degrees in the name of the State University of New York. As authorized by law and in accordance with the Rules of the Board of Regents, the State University Board of Trustees has selected to offer the following registered honorary degrees: Doctor of Fine Arts (D.F.A.), Doctor of Humane Letters (L.H.D.), Doctor of Laws (LL.D), Doctor of Letters (Litt.D), Doctor of Music (Mus.D.) and Doctor of Science (Sc.D.).
The specific honorary degree awarded shall be appropriate to the nature of the attainment that is being recognized.

C. Criteria for Selection of Degree Recipients

The basis for the selection of a degree recipient shall be consistent with the Purposes of Honorary Degrees stated above.
The nominee must be distinguished, and the person's achievements must be both relevant and appropriate to the nominating campus. Eligibility for nomination is restricted to persons of state, national or international stature. Nominees who have made extraordinary contributions to the nominating campus can also be considered, but must have made significant contributions beyond that single institution and their local region. Service to the University is not sufficient justification for the awarding of an honorary degree.

D. Time, Place and Method of Awarding Degrees

Honorary degrees shall be conferred at University ceremonies authorized by the Board of Trustees, including commencement exercises. The presentation of honorary degrees may also be permitted outside the normal procedures in unusual circumstances, such as to recognize visiting dignitaries and, in other special cases, as recommended to the Board by the chancellor.
Honorary degrees may be awarded in absentia, but only upon recommendation to the Board by the chancellor in the case of extraordinary and compelling circumstances. In the event of unexpected inability to appear at the scheduled time, the conferral may be postponed to the next appropriate ceremony, provided that the degree is conferred within one year after being authorized. A degree may be awarded posthumously if a recipient dies after notification of selection but before the ceremony.

E. Number of Degrees to be Awarded

The Board of Trustees shall determine the number of honorary degrees to be awarded in any academic year, with a maximum of 75. Subject to this authority, the chancellor may issue additional guidelines on numbers of degrees to be awarded.

F. Number of Nominations per Campus

Because the proliferation of honorary degrees may tend to diminish the prestige the University attaches to these awards, campuses should limit the number of nominations to as few as possible. In no case shall a campus submit more than five nominations. It should be remembered that the total number of honorary degrees to be awarded statewide is limited to 75.

G. Limitations on Eligibility

  1. Except under unique and unusual circumstances, honorary degrees shall not be awarded to:
    a. Members of the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York, the Councils at the State-operated campuses, the Board of Trustees of the State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and the Board of Trustees of the Community Colleges during their terms of service to the University.
    b. Members of the teaching or administrative staff, or any other employee in the University system while employed by the University.
    c. Current holders of New York elective public office or active candidates for elective public office.
  2. Since honorary degrees are conferred by the Board of Trustees for the State University and not individual campuses, no one already holding an honorary degree from the State University shall be eligible to receive a second honorary degree.

H. Procedures for Selection of Degree Recipients

Coordination of the selection and nomination process for honorary degree recipients is the responsibility of the campus president who shall empanel an advisory committee and review thoroughly that committee's recommendations. Throughout the procedure, the utmost care should be taken to ensure confidentiality. To verify the qualifications of nominees, campus nominating committees should consult confidentially with appropriate academic departments for review of proposed candidates.

  1. Nominations for degree recipients shall be encouraged from any member of the University community, including students, faculty, administrative staff, alumni and alumnae, members of Councils, Trustees, and friends of the University.
  2. Nominations originating on a campus should be submitted to the President of the institution with a detailed curriculum vitae, Who's Who entries, reviews or articles about the nominee's work and a list of major awards. The nomination submission must also include a clear and convincing statement regarding the relevance and/or appropriateness of the nominee to the nominating campus.
  3. Nominations from other sources within the University community should be made directly to the chancellor with the same documentation as above.
  4. Campus presidents shall empanel an advisory committee that includes representatives from faculty and staff, and which may also include representatives from other constituencies such as College Councils and the community. Small enough to ensure confidentiality, the committee shall gather the materials to support the nominations. This committee shall conduct a rigorous review of the qualification of the nominee(s), consulting as necessary with appropriate academic departments. The president shall make the final selection and forward the name(s) to the chancellor for consideration.
  5. The chancellor shall submit all nominations to the University-wide Committee on Honorary Degrees at a time determined by the chancellor.
  6. The Committee on Honorary Degrees, chaired by the provost, will review the nominees to ensure that they meet the qualifications established by the Board of Trustees. The provost will forward a list to the chancellor and the Board for final selection. The committee shall consist of 15 persons: 10 eminent faculty members in the University system appointed by the chancellor for three-year staggered terms, two senior administrators, two members of the Board of Trustees and the provost. The Committee shall follow these guidelines in its deliberations and shall submit the list of qualified nominees to the chancellor. In those rare cases where the request to award the degree is submitted outside the established timetable for such submissions, the Honorary Degree Committee chair will not reconvene the University-wide committee for review, but will, instead, discuss the nomination with three or four committee members and then inform the entire Committee of the recommendation.
  7. The chancellor shall submit the list of qualified nominees, with appropriate recommendations, to the Board of Trustees, which shall make the final selection of degree recipients.
  8. The chancellor shall notify campus presidents regarding the Board's selection of degree recipients. Upon receipt of the Board's approval to proceed, presidents shall issue invitations to nominees directly, on behalf of the chancellor, the Board of Trustees and themselves. Copies of these invitations must be provided to the chancellor and the provost.
  9. Nominees' responses to campus presidents must then be forwarded to the chancellor and the provost in a timely manner, so that Board resolutions can be prepared for those who accept the University's invitation.
  10. The Board wishes to re-emphasize that confidentiality must be maintained throughout the procedure to avoid potential embarrassment to all concerned.

415.26 ACADEMIC NOMENCLATURE

  1. A semester is a period of attendance in which the academic year is customarily divided into two equal sessions.
  2. A quarter is a period of attendance in which the academic year is customarily divided into four equal sessions.
  3. A student at a college operating on a semester basis is any undergraduate student registered for 12 or more credit hours of work in a regular program whether on campus or at another location, or any graduate student registered for nine or more credit hours.

415.27 OFFICIAL COLLEGE TRANSCRIPT POLICY — NONACADEMIC DISCIPLINARY ACTION

A. Dismissal: When a student has been dismissed for behavioral reasons, upon notification by the vice president for student affairs, the registrar will automatically place the notation "dismissed, disciplinary reasons" on the academic transcript. This notation will remain on the academic transcript permanently.

B. Suspension: When a student has been suspended for behavioral reasons, upon notification by the vice president for student affairs, the registrar will automatically place the notation "suspension, disciplinary reasons" on the academic transcript. This notation will remain on the academic transcript at least for the period of suspension. Suspension for hazing or other serious violations will permanently remain on the transcript. Others can petition to have the notation removed as follows:

  1. If the student is readmitted to SUNY Cortland: Upon completion of one academic year free of further disciplinary action, the student may ask the vice president for student affairs to have the transcript notation removed. The vice president for student affairs will notify the student in writing of his or her decision.
  2. If the student does not return to SUNY Cortland: Upon conclusion of the period of suspension plus one full year, the student may make a written request to the vice president for student affairs to have the transcript notation removed. The vice president will respond affirmatively or negatively in writing. The vice president for student affairs may have the notation restored if the individual becomes involved in any disciplinary incident on campus or in any criminal action in connection with the College.

C. Notification: This information will be communicated to the student at the time of the initial notification of suspension/dismissal.

(Revised Aug. 31, 1999)

415.28 DISCIPLINE ACTION PENDING

For more serious alleged policy violations, the director of student conduct can recommend to the vice president for student affairs that a Banner hold be implemented for students who may leave SUNY Cortland prior to disposition of the alleged violation. At the request of the student, arrangements can be made to dispose of the violations during his or her separation. If not, appropriate action will be taken upon the student's return to Cortland. The notation will remain on the transcript until appropriate disposition of the violation has been made.

(Approved Aug. 31, 1999)

415.29 GUIDELINES FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSALS TO CHANGE EXISTING POLICY OR INTRODUCE NEW ALL-COLLEGE EDUCATION POLICY

  1. Scope:
    The Education Policy Committee’s (EPC) jurisdiction shall extend to what is identified as All-College Education Policy, both in the College Handbook and the College catalogs. It shall also extend to procedures governing change of academic programs and curricula, as per the College Handbook (Chapter 150.03, Article VII, Section C, 3a, 1 and 2).
  2. Definitions:
    All-College Education Policy: All-College Education Policies are those delineated in the Academic Policies section of the College catalogs or in the College Handbook, Chapter 415.
    Educational policy that does not appear to impact other departments shall be set at the departmental level, in accordance with educational by-laws, and is not within the scope of EPC. Departmental educational and curricular policy set at the departmental level must be reviewed by the appropriate dean and only forwarded to EPC or the College Curriculum Committee if deemed appropriate by the school dean.
  3. Procedure for Undergraduate Policy Change that is All College:
    1. The department, school, administrative office (director level or above), Faculty Senate, and its components, or EPC can develop a proposal to change existing educational policy or introduce a new educational policy.
    a. If the policy originates at the departmental level or the school director level, the proposal is forwarded to the school dean and then to the EPC. If the policy proposal is not endorsed at the school level, a department may appeal to the EPC. The appeal must be made to the EPC within two weeks of the decision at the dean’s level.
    b. If the policy originates at the school dean level, the proposal is forwarded by the dean to the EPC.
    c. If the policy originates from an administrative office outside of a school, director level or above, the proposal is forwarded by that office
    to the EPC.
    d. If the policy originates from the Faculty Senate, or a component of the Senate such as a Senate committee, the proposal is forwarded to the EPC.

    2. When a policy proposal is forwarded to the EPC, or if the EPC originates a policy proposal, the EPC sends copies of the proposal (can be via email listservs) to deans, department chairs, the College Curriculum Review Committee chair, the Graduate Faculty Executive Committee chair, the Writing Committee chair, the General Education Committee chair, and the Teacher Education Council chair.
    a. Deans will address the policy proposal at their chairs’ councils. Committee chairs will disseminate the policy proposal to committee members.
    b. Any policy proposal that the EPC considers to be a General Education issue will be forwarded to the General Education Committee for a recommendation to the EPC.

    3. Faculty have two weeks to comment on the proposal in writing to the EPC. After the two-week comment period, and based on the feedback provided, the EPC will act on the proposal. The developer of the policy proposal can attend the EPC meeting and answer questions about the proposal when it is being considered. Other stakeholders may attend the meeting as well. The EPC will then take one of the following actions:
    a. Disseminate the policy proposal for further campus review (see distribution list in number 2 above, or
    b. Approve the policy proposal and forward a recommendation to the Faculty Senate, or
    c. Not approve the policy proposal, report the action to the Faculty Senate and return it to the policy developer with feedback regarding reasons for non approval.

    4. If the policy proposal is forwarded to the Faculty Senate, through the Faculty Senate Steering Committee, the policy proposal will be introduced, in writing, at one Faculty Senate meeting and voted on at the next meeting.

    5. After the Faculty Senate Meeting:
    a. If the educational policy proposal is approved by the Faculty Senate, the Faculty Senate Chair forwards the policy proposal to the provost, who then makes a recommendation to the president.
    b. If the policy proposal is not approved by the Faculty Senate, the Faculty Senate chair returns the proposal to the EPC and to the policy developer, with reasons for non approval.

    6. When an approved policy is forwarded to the provost and president, the president makes a decision on the educational policy proposal and notifies the Faculty Senate in writing. If the policy is not approved, the EPC requests that the president provide reasons for non approval.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum, May 22, 2006)

415.30 POSTHUMOUS DEGREE

SUNY Cortland may award a degree posthumously when a student has completed a substantial portion of the requirements for the degree and was in good academic standing at the time of death, as determined by the student’s major department and at the discretion of the president of the College. The degree would be awarded in recognition of the student’s work and as a source of solace to the student’s family.

(Approved by the Educational Policy Committee, April 9, 2010)

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CHAPTER 425: Policies of Established Fees, Fines and Charges

425.01 AUTHORIZATION TO ESTABLISH CHARGES

The president is authorized with University approval to establish a schedule of reasonable fines, fees, deposits and charges for violation of institutional regulations, late registrations, damage and breakage and special services. (Trustees, Jan. 22, 1963)

The College reserves the right to charge a nominal service fee in cases when students, through negligence, fail to meet certain administrative appointments important to the conduct of College business or to abide by publicly announced College deadlines.

425.02 FEE PAYMENT AND DEFERMENT

The payment of all fees and assessments is as directed by College officials. Fees and assessments are due as indicated on billing statements. Students who register for the fall semester during the official registration period are billed in July with payment due in early August. Advance registrants for the spring semester will be billed in mid-December with payment due in early January. Summer advance registrants will be billed in late April with payment due in early May. Winter term registrants' bills will be mailed in late November with payment due in early December.

Students may register in person after Web registration closes. They must be prepared to make payment arrangements or show proof of financial aid sufficient to cover their charges at that time.

Bills for semester charges are mailed to the student's permanent address on record. Students are responsible for ensuring the accuracy of their billing (permanent) address, telephone number and email address. Any special arrangements for billing to any address other than the permanent address must be made in writing in advance of the semester and approved by the Student Accounts Office.

Semester bills reflect charge and financial aid information as of print date. Actual approved financial aid awards, except for College Work-Study, may be used to defer college charges. Deferral of billed charges against financial aid is dependent upon meeting all academic requirements, completion of all necessary paperwork and confirmation on documentation from funding sources. The student remains fully liable for payment of all charges. Students are responsible for account balances and late fees if aid awards do not become actual, are reduced, or removed for any reason.

Confirmation of attendance is required of all advance registered students via mail or online on or before bill due date. Failure to confirm attendance and submit valid deferral or payment could result in the deletion of your class schedule. Postmark on or after the due date of the bill constitutes late payment. Students are responsible for ensuring payments are received prior to the required due date. Late payment fees are assessed on a per bill basis at the rate approved by the SUNY Board of Trustees up to $50, or the amount of outstanding obligation, whichever is less depending on the amount of the outstanding obligation.

Students registering at the start of the semester — open registration — or during add/drop are required to make payment arrangements at that time. Students registering at this time will be assuming financial responsibility for their courses. Failure to confirm attendance or attend classes will not result in removal of liability for charges.

Payments may be made in person, via mail or online using BannerWeb for students. We accept cash, checks, Master Card, Visa and Discover. Students may create permission for parents to pay all or part of their bills online. However, the student is responsible for ensuring that financial responsibility is accepted with either online confirmation or attendance or return of the confirmation/remittance portion of the semester billing statement with signature.

To assist students and parents in meeting financial obligations, SUNY Cortland offers a monthly payment plan. The plan consists of dividing the net balance due on the semester bill into five equal installments. This option may be selected when the initial semester bills are due. The nonrefundable enrollment fee is $35 per semester and must be included with the first payment. Subsequent payments are due the 15th of each following month. If the 15th falls on a weekend or holiday, payments are due the next immediate business day. Due to their short duration, there is no monthly plan available for Winter or Summer term.

Payments not received by the due date are subject to the assessment of a late fee. Payment plan enrollment is for the current semester only. Students who fail to enroll during the first month of the plan will be required to make up any missed payments. All payment plans end the last month of the semester and must be paid in full. The College reserves the right to deny future participation to students who fail to remain current or complete their payment plans.

Fees and assessments are due as indicated on billing statements. Other accrued debts owed to the College, or any agency thereof, must be paid prior to registration. If the registration occurs in error, the College reserves the right to cancel current registrations for prior unpaid obligations. The College is required to withhold all information regarding the records of students in arrears for the payment of fees or other charges. This will include withholding of transcripts, prohibiting future registration, recognition of completion of course work, or granting of degrees.

State law requires SUNY Cortland to engage in collection activity on delinquent accounts. Accounts remaining unpaid at the end of the term may be referred to outside collection agencies, the New York State Attorney General, or to the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance. These agencies may add interest, collection fees, court and other costs to the outstanding obligation. Interest may be assessed by collection agencies or the attorney general at the corporate underpayment rate set by the Commissioner of Taxation and Finance, compounded daily on the outstanding principal balance. In addition, collection fees of up to 22 percent of the debt, including interest, may be added.

425.03 ADMISSION DEPOSIT

The student admission deposit of $50, billed at the time of acceptance, is credited toward the payment of tuition.

425.04 ROOM DEPOSIT (CAMPUS-ADMINISTERED HOUSING)

A room deposit of $150 is required, and new students are billed at the same time as the admission deposit. Returning students are required to pay a $150 room deposit prior to on-campus housing room selection.

425.05 TUITION

State University of New York tuition for full-time undergraduates who are legal residents of New York state is currently $4,350 for the academic year (fall and spring semesters). Tuition for out-of-state undergraduates is currently $10,610. Under State University of New York policy, students must have resided in New York state for one year before entering college and satisfy other residency requirements as determined by the State University of New York to qualify for in-state tuition rates.

Graduate-level tuition is currently $288 per credit hour for New York state residents and $455 per credit hour for out-of-state residents.

425.06 COLLEGE FEE

The College Fee is $25 per year or $12.50 per semester. The fee is required under administrative policy of State University of New York and is not refundable.

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425.07 STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE FEE

The Student Health Service provides ambulatory health care to students so that they may participate successfully in the academic and extracurricular programs of their choice. The College’s Mandatory Health Fee has been incorporated into the Program Service Charge.

While health insurance is not required to attend SUNY Cortland, Student Health Service strongly recommends that all students have adequate health insurance that covers medical care in the Cortland and surrounding area. Having no health insurance puts students at very high financial risk in the event of an unforeseen illness or injury. In addition, many managed care plans from other areas do not cover care provided in Cortland other than emergency care. This means you could receive expensive bills for services that Student Health Service cannot provide such as laboratory studies or X-ray tests. The College will provide a student health insurance plan option for those students who do not have adequate coverage.

Detailed information regarding health insurance coverage, rates, waivers and due dates are available on the Student Accounts website.

In accordance with NCAA regulations, Cortland athletics team members must show proof of coverage at or before their initial team practice. Athletes who need to utilize the SUNY Cortland Health Insurance Plan may contact the College carrier for instructions on obtaining a health insurance ID card. Student Health Service may also provide temporary ID cards for in-person pickup only.

International/Study Abroad Students

Inbound international F-1 and J-1 visa holders, international exchange students and those students enrolled in outbound study abroad programs must meet SUNY's minimum standards for health insurance coverage and may be required to purchase the SUNY Board of Trustees mandated plan. Waivers out of the SUNY mandatory International Student Health Insurance plan are possible for outbound study abroad students, and are handled through the International Programs Office. All students studying abroad on a SUNY Cortland program must purchase Medical Evacuation and Repatriation insurance. Per SUNY policy, international student waivers out of the plan are only possible in limited circumstances.

Disclaimer (per SUNY Policy): “Neither the State of New York, through its agents, nor the State University of New York through its agents and employees, is responsible in any manner whatsoever for the payment of any claim for health-related services provided to individuals covered under this insurance policy. The State of New York and State University of New York are not responsible for obligations incurred by individuals who are not covered by this insurance policy. All individuals participating in State University’s health insurance program described herein are responsible for reviewing all descriptions of the scope and level of coverage offered by this policy. Such participants will be solely responsible for obtaining additional coverage not provided under this program if such is deemed necessary by the participant.”

(SUNY Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, Graduate Studies, and Professional Programs and Office of the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business, Memorandum to Presidents, “Guidelines for the Implementation of Health Insurance Coverage for International Exchange, Research, and Study Programs, Vol. 86, No. 9, June 5, 1986)

425.08 PROGRAM SERVICE CHARGE

The College Program Service Charge is required of all students enrolled in credit-bearing course work and is designed to incorporate various normally required fees and charges including athletic, student health services, technology, transportation and student activity, into one consolidated and streamlined charge. It is acknowledged that all students will not equally participate in each of the component fees but will receive equivalent overall benefit from the universally available services enhancing the campus life experience. Certain special and remote site programs may be exempt from some parts of the Program Service Charge.

Athletic: Funds intercollegiate athletics and is governed by the College Intercollegiate Athletics Board (CIAB) with equal (one-third) membership of students, faculty, administrators.

Student Health Services: Provides various health services and educational programs through the Division of Student Affairs.

Technology: Funds a variety of technology networking and access services for students, including computer labs, Internet access and technical support.

Student Activity: Governed by the Cortland College Student Government Association (SGA), which manages allocations and expenditures, funds student clubs and organizations, student fitness center memberships, special cultural and social events.

Transportation: Supports the enhanced on-campus bus shuttle service and provides free student vehicle parking at the Route 281 parking lot. Students must pay a vehicle registration fee.

425.09 ROOM AND BOARD

Board and room expenses vary, depending on accommodations and the meal plan chosen by the student.

425.10 PARKING AND VEHICLE REGISTRATION FEES

Students are required to register their vehicles with the University Police Department. Parking permit prices are listed on the Parking Department website.

425.11 LATE REGISTRATION CHARGE

All students are expected to academically and financially register on or before the start of the semester as specified in the College calendar. If for any reason this is impossible, special permission for late academic registration must be obtained from the appropriate school associate dean. A fee of $40 will be charged for late academic registration and $50 for late payment.

425.12 SPECIAL OR OPTIONAL FEES AND FINES

  1. Towel and locker charge.
  2. Teaching Certification Fee.
  3. Main Library
    1. Fines for Reserve books.
    2. Recalled Books Persons who have not returned general circulation books within seven days of notification are subject to per-day fines, with a per-book maximum.
    3. Please see staff in Electronic Media Center and Teaching Materials Center for their respective policies.
  4. Special Course Fees in certain activity and studio art courses.
  5. Special Course fees for use of Raquette Lake facilities.

425.13 COLLEGE FEE POLICY

  1. State-operated campuses of the State University are authorized to impose three types of fees: 1) broad-based fees; 2) academic course-related fees; and 3) user fees, charges and fines for violation of institutional regulations. Broad-based fees are generally charged to all enrolled students and include, but are not limited to Intercollegiate Athletic Fee, Health Services Fee, Technology Fee and College Fee. All new or increases of broad-based or academic course-related fees require the approval of the SUNY Vice-Chancellor for Finance and Business.
  2. All new broad-based fees or increases in current broad-based fees will go to the Student Government Association (SGA) for questions, comments and recommendations no later than February 20 for implementation in the fall semester of the following year, and by June 20 for implementation in the spring semester of the following year. In addition, any SUNY Policy or campus policy regarding approvals of any given fee will be adhered to.
  3. At least one public information session will be held on such fee increases before presentation to SGA.
  4. Refer to the Student Accounts Office Web page for details regarding each fee as well as the procedure for waiver or refunds and applicability to part-time and nontraditional students or to students doing off-campus placements.
  5. Fee rates for the following fall will be published to the campus community as soon as approved by the SUNY Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business. The desired dates are Feb. 15 for fall semester and Oct. 15 for spring semester.
  6. An exception to these policies will occur when state budget actions necessitate changes to the fees after the dates noted in order to advert negative consequences to campus services.
  7. Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account managers are reminded that monies generated by each fee must be used for the intended purpose.
  8. No increase to course-related or other group-specific fees will be made unless requests are made by the dates indicated in B, above, to allow time for approval by the Cabinet, SGA and the SUNY Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business.

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CHAPTER 430: Established Refund Policy

430.01 GENERAL POLICY

Students who withdraw from SUNY Cortland before the semester begins or after the semester is underway may be entitled to a refund of all or part of charges, deposits, and fees paid. Students incur liability based on the length of the academic term and the date of official withdrawal. To qualify for liability adjustments and possible refund of paid amounts, students must follow the College's official withdrawal policy and fill out and properly submit official withdrawal from course or withdrawal from college form(s), which may be obtained at the Registrar's Office.

Unofficial withdrawals and judicial terminations/suspensions do not qualify for any reduction of tuition or fee liability. Stop payment orders on checks or credit card payments do not constitute official withdrawal. Students who are denied permission to register at the College will be entitled to a full refund of tuition, room, and board charges. Students will receive a full refund of tuition and fees when a course is cancelled by the College.

Fee liability will only be adjusted up through the end of the first week of classes.

430.02 ADMISSION DEPOSIT

The pre-admission deposit will not be refunded after May 1 or 30 days after acceptance to enroll, whichever is later.

430.03 ROOM DEPOSIT

In order to receive a refund of the room deposit, the student applicant must provide written notification of withdrawal from the College to the Residential Services Office by May 1 prior to the fall semester and by Nov. 1 prior to the spring semester. If individuals submit their deposit after April 1 or Oct. 1, a refund will be granted if the written request is received within 30 days of the payment of the deposit and before the first day of occupancy.

430.04 TUITION AND FEES (FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS)

To qualify for any refund of the tuition and fee payments made to the College, the student is responsible for completing the appropriate forms pertaining to the action under consideration before any refund may be obtained. This action includes:

  1. Dropping a course
  2. Filing for a leave of absence
  3. Withdrawing from the College

The student must complete and file the forms in the Registrar's Office by the deadline according to the refund schedule.

  1. College Fee: This fee is nonrefundable.
  2. Tuition is refundable based on the length of term in accordance with SUNY Board of Trustees Policy Item 057.1, I, A. The tuition refund schedule is as follows:

TUITION REFUND DURING INDICATED WEEK

Length of term

First Week

Second Week

Third Week

Fourth Week

Fifth Week

Full semester 100% 70% 50% 30% 0%
Ten-week term 100% 50% 30% 0%  

Quarter or
eight-week term

100% 40% 20% 0%  
Five-week term 100% 25% 0%    
 

Second day of classes

Remainder of first week

After first week

Two-week term 100% 20% 0%

No money shall be refunded unless application for refund is made within one year of original payment. Reduction of tuition liability is made according to SUNY Board of Trustees Policies.

There will be no tuition or fee liability for a student who withdraws to enter full-time active duty in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force or Coast Guard of the United States. A student who is a member of a national Guard or Army, Navy, or Air Force Reserve Unit is entitled to reduced liability only if, in the judgment of a designated school official, the student is unable to attend classes due to hardship beyond the student's control and the student has made bona fide efforts to permit college attendance. Documentation of membership and official orders must be provided to the College prior to liability reduction. In the event that a refund is granted to a student in National Guard or Reserve status, documentation of membership, orders, and reasons for such actions shall be in writing and retained by the College (Student Accounts' Office).

Tuition liability calculations are separate and distinct from financial aid eligibility calculations. Financial aid packages will be affected by applicable Federal Title IV Regulations for students who withdraw before the 60 percent completion point of the semester. Those receiving federal financial aid in the forms of guaranteed student loans, Pell, SEOG, and Perkins loans may end up losing part or all of any aid awarded and/or paid. Students who are awarded 100 percent reduction of tuition and fee liability are not eligible for ANY financial aid for that term. Any aid that has already been disbursed to the student must immediately be repaid to the College.

D. Program Service Charge: This fee is refundable at 100 percent through the first week and at zero percent thereafter.

Note: For fall and spring semester refunds, the first day of class sessions shall be considered the first day of the semester and the first week of classes shall have been deemed to have ended when seven calendar days, including the first day of scheduled classes, have elapsed.

Refunds will be made by check and mailed to the last known permanent address that the College has for the person seeking the refund. Room, tuition and board refunds require two to four weeks for processing.

430.05 ROOM

Room refunds are based upon the date personal effects are removed from the room and checkout procedures have been followed. Students withdrawing from the College or released from residence after May 1 for the fall semester or Nov. 1 for the spring semester but prior to entering residence and who have prepaid room charges shall be entitled to a refund less $150 termination fee. In addition to the $150 termination fee, students who occupy a room for three weeks or less will receive a pro-rata refund based on a weekly charge for the number of weeks (or partial weeks) housed. Students who occupy a room after the Saturday following the third full week of occupancy in the residence halls will be liable for the entire semester's room rent. Terminations of the housing license due to judicial sanctioning do not receive a refund of room charges.

430.06 BOARD

Dining plans can be changed through the Friday of the first full week of classes on myRedDragon or by visiting the ASC office located in Neubig Hall.

The New York State Sales code governs the term for tax exempt dining plan refunds. The code stipulates that qualified refunds for tax exempt plans will be based on time criteria and not plan utilization. Except for reasons of dismissal or withdrawal from college, no refunds will be authorized after the close of business on the Friday of the first full week of classes. For plans offering a fixed number of meals, refunds or credits for cancellation, based on point values, are prorated for the time remaining on the plan, from the following Friday to the end of the current dining plan schedule. Refunds for the declining balance portion of the plans are based on point values prorated for the time remaining in the current dining schedule, or the full point balance on hand if such value is lower than the prorated amount.

Refunds are coordinated with the SUNY Cortland Student Accounts Office. The dining plan refund will be applied to any balance or debt owed to the College or ASC.

430.07 OPTIONAL FEES

  1. Towel and locker fee not refundable
  2. Linen service charge not refundable
  3. Special course fees are not refundable after the end of the first week of classes.
  4. Raquette Lake special course fees will be refunded up through the last published day to withdraw from the course. After the last published day of withdrawal the student is liable for the portion of the fee designated towards the administration and staffing of the Raquette Lake course (currently 50 percent of the total fee). Within fourteen days of the start of the course section, the remainder of the fee is non-refundable. Students must petition in writing to the Program Director for refund of Raquette Lake fee within one week of the withdrawal from the course.

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CHAPTER 435: College Business Policies and Procedures

435.01 EXECUTIVE BUDGET PROCESS

As a state-supported SUNY campus, Cortland receives approximately 37-42 percent of its educational and general operating budget from tax dollars with the remainder provided from tuition and fees. In addition, the residence hall program is administered on a self-sustaining basis. The following briefly describes the budget process, applicable to the state operations and residence hall (DIFR) budgets.

The state's constitution empowers the governor to require each department and agency to submit an annual budget request. The governor then prepares and submits an annual Executive Budget to the Legislature prior to February 1 of the fiscal year preceding the year in which the funds are to be expended. The Legislature may pass, reduce, eliminate, or add items to the budget subject to the governor's veto. The New York State fiscal year is from April through March, SUNY's is from July through June.

Deficiency budgets may be submitted through State University and the Executive Branch for Legislative action for unanticipated needs of the current fiscal year. Supplemental budgets may be submitted through State University and the Executive Branch for Legislative action for needs of the forthcoming fiscal year which could not be presented in the Executive Budget.

Preparation, Approval and Allocation
  1. SUNY System Administration submits the total University budget request to the Division of Budget and Legislative Committees in September.
  2. Division of Budget deliberation continues until the Governor's Executive Budget is submitted to the Legislature in January.
  3. Legislative review and appropriation bill passage, with related budget approvals, are scheduled to occur prior to the start of New York State's fiscal year (April 1).
  4. Prior to the approved SUNY operating budget:
    a. Appropriate campus officers may request departments and divisions under their authority to participate in the formulation of preliminary budget plans.
    b. The preliminary budget plans generally follow the current allocation distribution with known and approved adjustments.
  5. Once the State budget is approved, SUNY will apply the current Budget Allocation Process (BAP) formula and notify the campuses of their approved State Operations funding level.
  6. Campus operating budget adjustments may be necessary to adjust the preliminary budget to final approved funding levels.
  7. Funding distribution is made to appropriate campus officers and college-wide activities. Campus officers may further distribute approved funding to the appropriate level of responsibility in accordance with approved campus policies and priorities.
  8. Campus officers are accountable for the proper control and management of all funds allocated to them.

435.02 TUITION ASSISTANCE OR SUPPORT

  1. The State University Board of Trustees has established a policy of tuition assistance for employees of the State University. Each category of tuition support receives an allocation. Based on guidelines received from the State University of New York Office of Human Resources and State University Administrative Policies, departmental managers review applications in view of direct value to the College and, if endorsed, forward to the appropriate officer listed below.
  2. If the application is disapproved, the staff member making application then becomes liable for tuition and applicable fees.
  3. Professional service employees may obtain 100 percent support of tuition at SUNY State Operated institutions for "job-required" courses only. For other courses that are defined as "job-related," the employee may be eligible for a percentage of tuition support with the balance paid by the individual. Other fees must be paid by the student.
  4. Tuition support is limited to six credit hours for 10-month employees during any one academic year. Twelve-month employees will be considered on an ad hoc basis.
  5. Approval for study at a unit external to State University can be given only if the course is not offered at a State University unit. Assistance will be for tuition only, is limited to $25 per credit hour at the 100 percent reimbursement level, and must be charged to departmental funds.
  6. At least six weeks prior to registration for courses, interested staff members should contact the control officer for an explanation of application procedures.

The following offices and personnel will be responsible for processing applications:

Type Office
Graduate Assistants Financial Aid/Graduate Admissions offices
Critic Teacher Field Experience and School Partnerships Office
Employee Human Resources Office

In addition to the above, employee bargaining units offer tuition assistance and/or space-available waivers. Contact the bargaining unit representative or the Human Resources Office.

435.03 EXTRAMURAL ACTIVITIES

  1. Performance by faculty members of outside professional or scholarly services for compensation, within their area of professional competence, is recognized as a legitimate activity unless it is prohibited by the terms of their appointment.
  2. Compensated outside professional services by faculty members must be restricted at all times to engagements that do not interfere with the performance of their College duties.
  3. Faculty members engaged in providing compensated outside professional services should inform their immediate supervisors in writing of the nature of such service.
  4. Faculty members performing compensated outside professional services must inform those who engage them that the College is not a party to the contract and that the College is not liable or responsible in any way.
  5. Private use of College facilities, equipment and personnel, unless specifically authorized in writing by the president, is prohibited. No official College stationery or forms shall be used in connection with the actual performance of such services, nor shall the name of the College be used in any official way without prior approval.
  6. No compensation may be accepted by a faculty member for special tutoring of students enrolled in courses in the College that are offered by the faculty member's department. Graduate assistants may be excepted, if approved by the department chair and school dean.
  7. A professional staff member must gain approval to serve, for remuneration, beyond normal full professional responsibility. If extra payment is to be made from the home campus or other SUNY campus, or from another state agency, approvals must be gained. Contact the Human Resources Office for information.

435.04 FRINGE BENEFITS

The following briefly summarizes employee fringe benefits. Additional information on all benefits programs is available through the Human Resources Office.

A. Retirement

NYS Employees' Retirement System — classified or faculty
NYS Teachers' Retirement System — faculty only
Optional Retirement Program — only full-time faculty/professionals and part-time with term appointment

Investments available through:

  1. TIAA-CREF
  2. ING (Aetna)
  3. VALIC
  4. Metropolitan Life
B. Insurance
  1. Health Insurance Options
    a. Empire Plan (hospitalization through Blue Cross, major medical through United Health Care)
    b. Health Maintenance Organizations
  2. Prescription Drugs: Carriers and benefit levels vary among employee groups and upon health insurance option selected
  3. Dental Insurance: Various carriers and benefits depending upon employee group
  4. Income Protection: Disability and life insurance coverage is provided to some employee groups through the retirement systems and/or bargaining unit programs
  5. Personal Insurance: Auto/homeowners/renters insurance policies are available for most employee groups through bargaining units and the State of New York
C. Tax Shelter Programs

Deferred compensation and tax deferred annuities are available through a variety of vendors depending upon employee group.

D. Savings Bond Program

Employees can purchase savings bonds through payroll deduction.

E. Credit Union

Employees are eligible to join the Syracuse Federal Credit Union and the Cornell Finger Lakes Community Credit Union.

F. Direct Deposit

Employees can have paychecks directly deposited at most banking institutions.

435.05 FACULTY ASSOCIATES

Local educators who host SUNY Cortland student teachers and practicum students are designated "faculty associates" and are entitled to a variety of professional courtesies from the College. Examples include access to the College library, use of fitness and recreation facilities at faculty rates, access to campus events at faculty rates, and the right to purchase a SUNY Card for identification purposes at faculty rates (see 435.06). Interested individuals may find out more about the faculty associate designation and its benefits by calling the Field Experience and School Partnerships Office at 607-753-2824.

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435.06 FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT ID CARDS

The SUNY Card, the College’s official photo identification card, is a multipurpose, video-imaged identification card with electronic verification capability. The SUNY Card provides access to student residence halls, meal plans, library services and network printing and copying. The SUNY Card also is used for the ASC Connections account, which can be used for College Store purchases, vending machines, laundry, as well as food purchases both on campus and at participating off-campus restaurants. SUNY Cards are required for all students, faculty and staff and must be presented for all card transactions.

With appropriate documentation, the SUNY Card is issued by the Auxiliary Services Corporation (ASC) to all students, College employees, College retirees, members of the College Council, Alumni Board, Cortland College Foundation, employees of the Auxiliary Services Corporation, Cortland College Child Care Center, Research Foundation, faculty associates, and spouses, domestic partners and dependent family members of card holders. Dependent family members are defined as dependent children (under age 19; if a full-time student, under age 25) and other legal dependents.

A staff/student SUNY Card will be issued to staff who are enrolled as SUNY Cortland students in exchange for their staff card. The staff/student SUNY Card will have an expiration date of August 31, and ASC will revalidate the SUNY Card each fall at no cost as long as the staff member remains enrolled as a SUNY Cortland student. When the staff member is no longer taking classes, he/she will return the staff/student SUNY Card to ASC, and ASC will re-issue a staff SUNY Card at no charge.

Other individuals who have a legitimate relationship with the campus may be eligible for a SUNY Card (e.g., students from other schools completing an internship at SUNY Cortland, NYPIRG representatives stationed on campus, international visiting scholars, volunteers who have been officially appointed). Eligibility for a SUNY Card for such individuals will be authorized by the appropriate vice president.

Presentation of the official SUNY Card admits cardholders to many campus and home athletic events. Cardholders may also receive discounts on ticket purchases for College programs and events. Dependent cardholders are required to pay admission to athletic events.

Cards may be obtained upon presentation of eligibility and another form of photo identification at the ASC Office in Neubig Hall during normal business hours. A charge is imposed for the replacement of any lost or mutilated cards.

435.07 BUSINESS CARDS

Business cards are available to current College faculty and staff for business use only. The College provides business cards with personal information, such as home address, home phone or personal cell phone numbers only for individuals who work off campus, such as student teacher supervisors, with departmental approval.

435.08 PAYROLL

For specific information regarding payroll, please contact the Business Office - Payroll. For specific information regarding personnel and fringe benefit matters, please contact the Human Resources Office.

435.09 PURCHASING

Faculty, Staff and College administrators are encouraged to use College-issued Procurement Cards (p-card) for purchases that are below set thresholds. If a purchase will not be made with a p-card, departments are required to submit an approved requisition to the Purchasing Office. Use of Office of General Services (OGS) state contracts also is encouraged. Departments should consult with the Purchasing Office for purchases of commodities or services that are not on State Contract and may exceed $20,000.

For specific information on purchasing of goods or services, please contact the Business Office - Purchasing or refer to the Business Office Purchasing Procedures on file in departmental offices and on the Business Office Web page.

As a New York State agency, College purchasing policies adhere to State and University guidelines and follow generally accepted purchasing practice. The Business Office - Purchasing is the office authorized to commit appropriated funds for goods and services and seeks to gain the highest possible value for purchased goods and services. All agreements and contracts involving College departments must be reviewed and approved by the purchasing office.

435.10 MINORITY/WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES (M/WBE) PROGRAM

In compliance with NYS Executive Order No. 21 and SUNY M/WBE policies, all supervisors are encouraged to purchase from certified M/WBE vendors (listing available in the Business Office) in making open-market purchases. Lower price (except where there is documented evidence of M/WBE prices exceeding 10 percent of competitive vendors) from a non-M/WBE vendor may not be sufficient justification for choosing a non-M/WBE vendor.

435.11 GUIDELINES FOR PAYMENT OF CONSULTANTS

  1. Payment is for contractual service rendered; there must be no "employee- employer" relationship. The payment is treated as reportable taxable income.
  2. Payments are made by voucher from the Supplies and Expense funds of the department requesting the service, with a three-day maximum duration.
  3. Special external approvals must be gained if the consultant is a New York State employee.
  4. For service in excess of three days the individual consultant must be treated as an employee via payroll processing, or a formal contract must be executed (see purchasing procedures). If a SUNY employee, the payroll payment is treated as extra service. If a non-SUNY, New York State employee, external approvals must be gained under dual-employment regulations.

435.12 TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT LIMITATIONS FOR CANDIDATES

The following are relevant excerpts from the Comptroller's Rules and Regulations. Reimbursement at normal rates for travel expenses incurred by persons attending interviews for positions for which there can be documented a shortage of qualified candidates is allowable as follows:

  1. Reimbursement will be allowed to persons residing more than 50 miles from the place of interview.
  2. Candidates are to initially cover all expenses incurred relating to the interview, with applicable reimbursement to be accomplished subsequently.

435.13 REIMBURSEMENT OR PAYMENT FOR FOOD/BEVERAGES

Under certain circumstances, cost of food and beverages can be considered an appropriate expenditure, through the use of both New York State and Research Foundation funds. Faculty and staff must adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Under no circumstances is the cost of alcoholic beverages acceptable.
  2. Normally State employees are not to be recipients of food and beverages, although certain circumstances are acceptable, such as the provision of food and beverages in support of a formal official business setting (e.g., conference, workshop, training session). Expenditures for food and beverages in a largely social, unstructured setting (e.g., receptions, parties) are not allowable.

A complete set of guidelines governing the authorized purchase of food and beverages with State or Research Foundation funds can be obtained from the Business Office.

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Chapter 437: Web Policy

SUNY Cortland's Web Policy applies to information:

  1. published on servers owned by SUNY Cortland;
  2. published within the SUNY Cortland cortland.edu domain; and
  3. published elsewhere under direction or control of a SUNY Cortland department, organization or individual, where the contents are identified as SUNY Cortland information.

In many instances, SUNY Cortland's website is governed by the same policies that regulate similar operations across the College, such as campus advertising policies in the College Handbook, style guidelines in the SUNY Cortland Communication Guide and the Code of Student Conduct. Policies that are specific to use of the website are found in the Communication Guide under Web Policy.

Chapter 438: Electronic Master Calendar

438.01 POLICY STATEMENT 

This policy governs the creation, administration and presentation of the College’s Electronic Master Calendar. The Electronic Master Calendar is the central repository of all campus events and is part of the College’s event management and space scheduling system. Space scheduling and other event management functions are addressed in Chapter 440 of the College Handbook. 

438.02 PURPOSE

The Electronic Master Calendar is the master repository of all campus events. Events are presented via the Web or through myRedDragon in the form of calendars. 

438.03 DEFINITIONS

Event Management System (EMS): The College’s centralized software program designed for scheduling events, facility reservations and electronic master calendaring.  EMS is maintained by Information Resources. 

Electronic Master Calendar: The central repository within EMS where all events are stored.

Event Requestor: A faculty or staff member who uses EMS to request a facility for the purpose of scheduling an event.

Events: All happenings of the campus – meetings, seminars, workshops, conferences, performances, gallery events, graduation, sporting events, recreational events, academic events, due dates/deadlines, open enrollment, etc. 

Event Types: Each event within EMS is categorized by event type.  This is a required field when an event requestor schedules an event.  Web users can then create filters to customize their view of the calendar by event type.

Event Description: Event description is a memo field that may be completed by the event requestor in order to provide additional information about the event.  This information will display on a calendar when the user mouses over the event.

Space Manager: Campus spaces are managed by offices or individuals as pre-defined by the College.  Within EMS, each space has an assigned space manager.  Space managers approve/deny space requests and manage their space’s room features, setup options, hours of availability, etc.

Calendars: EMS events are presented to Web users as calendars.  Examples include the Featured Events Calendar and the myRedDragon Calendar.

Calendar Manager: Each calendar is managed by one or more individuals.

Calendar Presentation: Calendars may be “fixed” or “personalized."

Fixed Calendar Presentation: The calendar presents a set of events that may not be filtered by users.

Personalized Calendar Presentation: The calendar presents a set of events; however, Web users may create filters to personalize the presentation.

Featured Events Calendar: This is the calendar that appears on the College home page.  The Public Relations Office manages this calendar.

myRedDragon Calendar: This calendar appears on the Home tab within myRedDragon and can be personalized by users.  Filters set by the user are automatically saved. Information Resources manages this calendar.

438.04 SCHEDULING AN EVENT

Event requestors may schedule an event and request a facility online by logging into EMS through myRedDragon. The Event requestor must complete the online form requirements before an event will be added to EMS. Facility requests are not automatically granted, and will be routed to the appropriate space manager for consideration. Space requests are not approved until they receive confirmation from the space manager. (See Chapter 440 for more information about facility requests.)

Events must have an associated department or campus organization. The event requestor must have appropriate representative authority for the department or organization. 

Event type is a required field the event requestor must complete during scheduling.  Event type is a pre-defined category list that is used by calendar managers and web users to filter the presentation of their calendars. 

Event description is a memo field that may be completed to provide additional information about the event. This information will display on a calendar when the user mouses over the event. Information in this field must comply with SUNY Cortland guidelines provided in student, faculty and staff handbooks, the Communication Guide, relevant College policies, and state and federal laws and regulations.

438.05 ADDING EVENTS TO A CALENDAR

Event requestors submit their event for the calendar during the scheduling process. The online reservation form includes the ability to submit an event for inclusion on the myRedDragon Calendar (automatically granted) and the ability to submit an event to be included on the Featured Events Calendar. The Public Relations Office will review the event for inclusion on the Featured Events Calendar (see Chapter 461 of the College Handbook). 

438.06 ADDING OFF-CAMPUS EVENTS TO A CALENDAR

All College owned/operated facilities are listed within the myRedDragon Room Reservation System for scheduling and adding events to the calendar.  Event requestors may request that their College event that is taking place outside of College owned/operated facilities be considered for inclusion on the myRedDragon Calendar by sending an email with all of the event details to Information Resources.

438.07 PERSONALIZING THE MYREDRAGON CALENDAR 

Web users may customize the myRedDragon Calendar that appears on the home tab within myRedDragon. Using the filter button, the Web user may select events of interest and save the setting. At any time, the Web user may change or remove filter settings and see all public events.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, June 25, 2012)

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CHAPTER 439: Featured Events Policy

439.01 POLICY STATEMENTS

This policy governs the creation and administration of SUNY Cortland’s Featured Events, which is integrated with the College’s home page and the Web content management system. Featured Events provides a platform for publishing events intended for the campus community and the general public.

This policy establishes a framework and a process for publishing consistent, accurate and timely information about the campus. It also intends to: 

  • promote ease of use in locating events of interest
  • maintain clarity and reduce ambiguity
  • facilitate a positive user experience
  • assure consistency with the College’s marketing plan
  • portray a consistently positive College image.

439.02 DEFINITIONS

Content Management System (CMS): A Web application for creating and managing HTML and other Web files. The CMS is managed by the Publications and Electronic Media Office.

Event Management System (EMS): A software program designed for scheduling events and making room reservations. EMS is managed by Information Resources.

Featured Events: A component of the CMS used to promote campus events. It resides on the College’s home page and is managed by the Public Relations Office.

439.03 EVENT MANAGEMENT/ELECTRONIC MASTER CALENDAR SYSTEM

The College maintains a centralized system for scheduling events, space management and electronic master calendaring called Event Management System (EMS). All events are stored in a central calendaring repository within EMS. Events may appear on various electronic calendars or no calendar at all. 

439.04 FEATURED EVENTS AUDIENCE

Featured Events is designed for the campus community and the general public. The goal is to share information about and promote College-wide events, activities and significant dates, with the intent of increasing participation in campus life.

439.05. EVENT CREATION AND MANAGEMENT FOR FEATURED EVENTS

Events submitted within EMS will be considered for inclusion in Featured Events upon review by Public Relations Office staff.

The director of public relations, the director of publications and electronic media and the Web communications manager will be responsible for posting events featured on the College’s home page.

Event postings must comply with SUNY Cortland guidelines provided in student, faculty and staff handbooks, the Communication Guide, relevant College policies, and state and federal laws and regulations.

The director of public relations, the director of publications and electronic media or the Web communications manager reserve the right to deny event listings that do not meet the above guidelines.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, June 25, 2012.)

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CHAPTER 440: Policies for the Use of College Facilities

440.01 PRIORITY IN THE USE OF COLLEGE FACILITIES

The following priority will be used in assigning facilities:

  1. Academic and related activities of the College such as scheduled classes, registration, Commencement and Honors Convocation.
  2. Intercollegiate athletic contests that are post-season in nature.
  3. Regularly scheduled intercollegiate athletic contests during official seasons as defined by NCAA.
  4. College events that are scheduled annually and require a specific date such as Homecoming, Family Weekend and Alumni Reunion.
  5. Events sponsored by the College annually and requiring a specific date such as the Residence Life Conference.
  6. Scheduled intercollegiate athletic practices during the traditional season as defined by NCAA.
  7. Scheduled extramural sport club competition and scheduled intramural contests.
  8. Scheduled intercollegiate athletic practices during the nontraditional season as defined by NCAA.
  9. Scheduled sport club practices (those clubs that compete extramurally).
  10. Scheduled open recreation.
  11. Activities, programs and meetings by recognized student organizations or clubs.
  12. Activities, programs and meetings by non-college organizations that relate to the mission of the College.
  13. Activities, programs, and meetings by non-college organizations.

440.02 APPROPRIATE USE OF COLLEGE FACILITIES

The primary purpose of SUNY Cortland is to serve its many publics as an institution of higher education. Within this context, the College provides students, faculty/staff, guests, and invitees of the institution the use of campus facilities.

Recognizing that SUNY Cortland receives support from public funds, the College is committed to making its facilities as readily available for use by all groups and individuals as is consistent with its educational mission, its duties as a custodian of state resources, and its responsibility to consider the welfare of its students, faculty, staff and visitors. The intent of this policy is not to place unreasonable restrictions on use, but rather to provide for access on a basis that is both clearly defined and in the best interest of each of the constituencies to whom SUNY Cortland is obligated by policy and tradition.

An event shall not be permitted for any reason which, although in accord with the general purpose of the College, is of such character or occurs at such time or in such circumstance that it is likely to interfere or cause major conflict with any College activity, program or event. The use of College facilities will be refused to any event requestor or group that abuses the privilege through destruction of property or violation of policies described in the College Handbook.

440.03 NONCREDIT USE OF CAMPUS FACILITIES

A. Purpose

For noncredit use of facilities, SUNY Cortland will charge non-college organizations an operational reimbursement to cover the cost of facilities on College grounds. Examples of such costs are maintenance, repair, equipment replacement and utilities. In addition to the operational reimbursement, organizations will pay for any labor, services, equipment and damage costs incurred by their programs.

Generally, SUNY Cortland departments, offices, authorized student activities and campus-related organizations will not be charged the operational reimbursement; however, charges may be levied when activities generate additional costs for labor, services, equipment, damage, etc.

B. Faculty or Staff Requests

The proposed use of space by faculty or staff for noncredit use will be subject to endorsement by the appropriate academic department chair, administrative officer or other officially recognized College unit. No authorization will be given to an individual faculty or staff member to use College facilities for an event or activity that is solely for the personal gain or pleasure of the individual.

C. Student or Student Group Requests

The proposed use of space by students and student groups will be subject to endorsement by an organization recognized by the student government and must meet criteria established by the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office.

D. Non-Discrimination Clause

There shall be no discriminatory practices in connection with any event because of race, color, creed, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or sexual orientation. General use of SUNY Cortland facilities is intended primarily for official College units and officially recognized faculty, staff, student groups and campus-related organizations conducting programs consistent with College objectives. However, to further its commitment to education and public service, SUNY Cortland supports the use of College facilities by non-College organizations where such use does not infringe upon, compete, delay or conflict with normal operations of the College. In making its facilities available to non-College organizations, it is not the intent of the College to compete with private business enterprises having similar facilities of adequate capacity to accommodate the needs of such organizations.

Definitions

a. College facilities include land, grounds, structures, buildings, equipment and furniture.

b. Off-campus organizations shall be deemed to include:

  1. Federal, state or local government units, departments and agencies.
  2. Business, charitable, civic, community, cultural, educational, religious, entertainment, industrial, labor, political, professional, and recreational organizations operating on a not-for-profit basis and having broad educational or public service purpose and whose purposes are not directly related to the student life, research, or instructional programs of the College. The Auxiliary Services Corporation of SUNY Cortland (ASC) is authorized to provide services on campus and shall be deemed a College organization for purposes of this policy.
  3. Business and commercial enterprises that operate on a profit-making basis.
  4. Religious organizations may be authorized to use College facilities for the conduct of conferences or meetings. However, authorization will not be given for the express purpose of a religious service other than at the request of a group of College students, per item 076, Policy Handbook, State University of New York.

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440.04 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY ON CONFERENCES

The College is committed to increasing conference activity on campus in pursuit of the state university goal of enhancing the public and community service role of the university. In addition, conference activity contributes to the economic welfare of the community; utilizes idle buildings and facilities; adds to the vitality and even excitement of the campus; generates modest net revenue for equipment, renovation of spaces used by conferences, and other campus needs; and spreads the reputation of the campus for hospitality, good food, well-maintained buildings and facilities, superior organization and the beauty of its surroundings.

  1. Conference Definition: Any use of a College facility for a specified time period may be considered a conference. A conference is a meeting, or a series of meetings, that has been specifically designed and organized around a central objective, theme, and/or goal. Participants at conferences are referred to as conferees. A conference can be sponsored by a College group or by a non-College group. SUNY Cortland reserves the right to accept or deny any request for the utilization of College facilities.
  2. Priorities: The academic functions of the College naturally and properly come first in utilization of campus buildings, equipment and personnel. In times of conflict, the College will attempt to accommodate a conference if the academic functions can take place as scheduled without undue hardship. The specific priorities for the use of College facilities are spelled out in paragraph 440.01.
  3. Coordination: The function of director of conferences is assigned to the director of Corey Union. The director is responsible for the implementation of conferences on our campus. Duties are to include: providing prospective clients with information; obtaining commitments from support offices and personnel and scheduling needed facilities, ASC staff, and other concerned offices; and signing commitments with clients. Additionally, the director should see that a formal letter of agreement is prepared for each conference, listing charges, facilities used and services to be provided; that unusual or questionable requests be forwarded via the appropriate vice president to the President's Cabinet for decision; and that all state, SUNY and College regulations are observed. In order to reduce confusion, the use of facilities for conference activities must be approved by the director of Corey Union and conferences.
  4. Revenue: Conference income will be deposited in an appropriate (IFR or agency) account from which all direct expenses will be paid. In the case of conferences initiated by College departments or offices, a charge of $1 per paid registrant, per day will be levied for the purposes of the College. Should SUNY Cortland faculty/staff and/or students participate in a campus-held conference, they will be exempt from this charge.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, May 2, 1994)

440.05 EVENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS)

The College maintains a centralized system for scheduling of events, space management and electronic master calendaring called Event Management System (EMS).

440.06 EMS DEFINITIONS

Electronic Master Calendar: All events are stored within a central calendaring repository within EMS. Events may appear on various calendars or no calendar at all. See College Handbook, Chapter 439 for more information.

Event Requestor: Campus users may schedule an event and request a facility online by logging into EMS. Events are scheduled on behalf of a campus department or organization. Therefore, event requestors must have appropriate representation authority.

Events: All happenings of the campus: meetings, seminars, workshops, conferences, performances, gallery events, graduation, sporting events, recreational events, academic events, due dates/deadlines, open enrollment, etc.

Calendars: EMS includes multiple electronic calendars: Featured Events, Dates and Deadlines, myRedDragon. Each of these calendars is managed by an appropriate office. Event requestors may ask for their event to be included on specific electronic calendars when making their request.

Buildings: EMS includes all structures and outdoor spaces that could be scheduled.

Rooms/Spaces: EMS includes all rooms, sports fields and spaces that could be scheduled.

Space Manager: Campus spaces are managed by offices or individuals as pre-defined by the College. Within EMS, each space has an assigned space manager. Space managers approve/deny space requests and manage their space’s room features, setup options, hours of availability, etc.

Room Setup Type: Some campus spaces have multiple room setup types (furniture). Users may browse a room’s setup types through the Browse Facilities functions within EMS. Event requestors must select a room setup type when requesting space.

Room Setup Time: Some room setup types require additional time to arrange the furniture prior to the event, and then time to return to the default setup. The required setup/tear-down time is automatically calculated by EMS for each setup type.

Room Features: Each room within EMS lists the features of the room: carpet, window, whiteboard, data projector, computer, etc. Catering and food and beverages are only permitted in designated spaces.

440.07 FACILITY USE TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Each campus space has a defined capacity and terms of use. EMS requires the event requestor to agree to abide by the requested space’s defined capacity and terms and conditions.

Decorations/Displays/Posters

A. Scotch tape, masking tape, thumb tacks and staples are not permitted to be adhered to walls and/or windows in any campus facility. All decorations must be of fireproof materials. Exits must be kept cleared and fire prevention/safety regulations followed.
All publicity, posters, displays, public announcements, etc. must be approved by the director of Corey Union and conferences. Unauthorized posters will be removed.

  1. All advertisements by commercial businesses or through commercial businesses must fall within the guidelines of the College's advertising policy (Section 481.05).
  2. Campus organizations may not advertise social events that indicate drinks are free, sold at reduced prices, or otherwise appear to encourage unlimited or excessive drinking.

B. The use of College facilities will be refused to any event requestor or group that abuses the privilege through destruction of property or violation of policies described in the College Handbook.

440.08 LIABILITY FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY

The College and the state of New York are not liable for damages to or loss of personal property stored on the SUNY Cortland campus. Personal property is not covered absent a contractual provision that specifies protection, and there is no mechanism for the College to reimburse faculty/staff for any personal losses. It is recommended that personal property of any value be stored off-campus and/or insured privately.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, Feb. 9, 1999)

440. 09 SCHEDULING EVENTS AND REQUESTING SPACE

All events and spaces are managed in the Event Management System (EMS). All conference rooms will be available within the myRedDragon Room Reservation System for faculty and staff to schedule unless the Facilities and Master Planning Oversight Committee (FMPOC) has approved a department’s appeal that their conference room be designated for departmental private use only. Even so, these conference rooms must also be scheduled internally through EMS.

Event requestors must agree to the terms of use for the space being requested.

Event requestors may schedule events and request space online in EMS by logging into myRedDragon. After the event requestor submits the completed request, the form is electronically routed to the appropriate space manager for approval. Email updates are provided along the workflow process to keep the event requestor informed of the status. If the request is approved by the space manager, the event is forwarded to the appropriate electronic calendar owner for approval. If the space request is denied by the space manager, the event requestor will be notified via email that he/she needs to look for a different space for the event.

Space managers may need to bump scheduled events due to a change in priority of space usage. If this is necessary, the space manager will notify the affected event requestor. The event requestor will be responsible for finding an alternative space for his/her event and notifying attendees of the change in location.

Some campus spaces permit multiple furniture setup options. Setup services are provided by appropriate campus departments (Corey Union, Physical Plant, ASC). EMS provides the available setup types in the room setup tab when event requestors are browsing for a space. Each setup type automatically includes the needed time for setup and tear-down. If an event requestor selects a setup type that requires a longer setup time than is possible due to a preceding or later event, EMS will deny the request due to the scheduling conflict.

EMS lists additional services that may be available for each room including: catering availability, technology, specialized equipment (ex. piano), UPD security, etc. event requestors may request these services through EMS; however, the service provider (ASC, Information Resources, UPD, etc.) will confirm or deny the services separately.

440.10 SCHEDULING EVENTS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE SPACE

Event requestors may request an event be included on an electronic calendar even if the event does not require a space on campus (due dates, deadlines, etc.) The event requestor submits the event through EMS after logging into myRedDragon. After completing the event form, it will be electronically routed to the appropriate calendar manager for approval. Email updates are provided along the approval process to keep the event requestor informed of the status.

440.11 SPONSORSHIP OF EVENTS HELD BY NON-COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS

Occasionally, non-College organizations seek support from the College for activities and programs that occur either in the community or on the campus. In the spirit of partnership, the College may lend support or enter into a sponsorship agreement with such non-college entities.

This includes the use of College equipment off the campus or the use of College facilities at reduced or at no cost.

College sponsorship of an activity that is primarily the responsibility of a non-College entity normally requires a more substantial commitment of College resources and therefore must directly promote the mission of SUNY Cortland. Program support, including the use of SUNY Cortland equipment, may be permitted without official sponsorship designation. Policies that govern the use of College equipment are found in Chapter 450 of the College Handbook.

Sponsorship requests developed by College faculty, staff, or students must be reviewed by the appropriate vice president for official College approval. Sponsorship requests that do not involve College faculty, staff, or students must be approved by the vice president for finance and management. Once a decision is reached in either of these sponsorship situations, a copy of the decision letter needs to be sent to the director of Corey Union and conferences.

440.12 RESPONSIBILITIES OF SPONSORING DEPARTMENT

College policy requires that at any function using College facilities there must be a responsible member of the sponsoring department present throughout the event. Sponsoring departments are responsible for the conduct of those attending events and for cleanup of facility immediately after the events. All damage or loss of property must be reported the following day by a representative of the sponsoring department. The sponsoring department is responsible for all damages or losses incurred during the activity. Liaison with the appropriate space manager must be established and maintained from the time the event is scheduled until after it has been completed and all obligations fulfilled. The use of College facilities will be refused to any event requestor or group that abuses the privilege through destruction of property or violation of policies described in the College Handbook.

A. The proposed use of space by non-College groups will be subject to endorsement by the director of Corey Union and conferences. Commitments regarding use of SUNY Cortland facilities may be made only by the director of Corey Union and conferences and only after consideration of a formal application. Individuals with room or building responsibility responding to personal or telephone inquiries concerning the type of facilities and/or services available should not convey any impression that a commitment of facilities or services has been or will be made. The individual or organization should be referred to the director of Corey Union and conferences to complete formal application for use of facilities.

1. Required actions of the non-College organization:

Non-College organizations must complete a College Facilities Request Form provided by the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office and should contain all necessary information including but not limited to:

  1. Name and function of the group.
  2. Name, phone number and address of the individual responsible for the event.
  3. Purpose of the meeting, function or event.
  4. Preferred meeting date.
  5. College facilities, food service, personnel required and other special needs such as setup, AV and other equipment.
  6. Liability statement (Proof of insurance if required)

2. Actions of the director of Corey Union and conferences:

  1. The director of Corey Union and conferences checks availability of space via EMS.
  2. The director of Corey Union and conferences initiates application form, notes special services desired or required, distributes to specific areas to obtain cost estimates; assigns operational reimbursement charge.
  3. The director of Corey Union and conferences completes a revocable permit.
  4. Estimate of charges will be completed on "confirmation" letter to permittee.
  5. The director of Corey Union and conferences obtains requestor signature noting acceptance of terms and cost estimates.
  6. The director of Corey Union and conferences reviews and signs form and will add the probable need for personnel services, if any; the director of Corey Union and conferences distributes one copy each to the building administrator, university police, and physical plant.
    1. Actual labor costs following the event are submitted to the vice president for finance and management by physical plant, public safety, and other areas when applicable.
    2. The director of Corey Union and conferences collects actual charges for audio visual (special lighting, sound equipment, etc.), housing, physical plant, public safety, etc.

B. Requesting Space for Non-College Organizations

Non-college organizations may not directly access EMS to schedule an event or request space. Instead, they must complete a College Facilities Request Form provided by the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office. Once this completed form is received, campus activities may delegate responsibility to the sponsoring department to coordinate the event when needed; however, the sponsoring department may not coordinate the event until they have received approval from campus activities. Should a sponsoring department receive the request first, they should refer the non-College organization to complete the College Facilities Request Form.

Either campus activities or the sponsoring department will need to log into EMS and complete all event and/or space requests on behalf of the non-College organization. Either campus activities or the sponsoring department will be the event requestor for the non-College organization’s event and have all liaison responsibilities for coordinating the event with the requested space’s space manager and all other requested services for the event. The EMS space request form shall include the sponsoring department in the “department” field and the name of the off-campus organization in the “secondary contact” fields.

C. Priority of Scheduling

  1. Official College use of all facilities shall have first priority. See 440.01.
  2. Requests for use of facilities for official purposes by SUNY Cortland-affiliated groups, SUNY System Administration, and New York state governmental agencies will be given approval over other non-college organizations.

D. Publicity

All information and promotional materials prepared by a reserving organization in conjunction with an event scheduled on campus must identify the sponsoring group and must not in any way imply sponsorship by State University of New York College at Cortland unless specifically approved by the College. Public advertisements for non-College organization activities shall be subject to approval by the director of Corey Union and conferences as the College president's designee. See also 440.15.

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440.13 MAJOR EVENTS

Major events that are planned to be held within a College facility or on College property and open to the College community and the general public must be planned with the utmost concern for safety and security. To minimize problems associated with staging an event and also minimizing the liability to the hosts and the College, proper planning procedures are necessary.

A. Contracts and Agreements

Pre-booking discussions for outside speakers, events, concerts, etc., — those that require a contract, auditorium size or theater space, and/or technical support — should be conducted with appropriate advisors, building administrators and staff within the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office prior to any commitment being made and/or signing any contract. Once it is determined that the provisions for hosting a speaker or event on the Cortland campus can be met by the campus and our provisions for hosting the event are understood by the speaker and/or performer, a production meeting should be held with the director of Corey Union and conferences and other appropriate personnel as needed such as public safety, the physical plant and the building administrator.

No campus space will be reserved until the director of Corey Union and conferences or his/her designee has reviewed the proposed contract. It is in the best interest of the organization and/or sponsors not to sign a contract with any speaker or performer until there is certainty that the conditions of the contract can be met, including providing space, security and other technical requirements.

B. Security

The College cannot permit any outside group to bring any form of armed security onto campus, nor can the welfare and safety of the speaker/performer or the audience be assured unless appropriate security and staffing arrangements are provided by the College. This may require the hiring of additional security, and those costs will be borne by the sponsoring group.

Campus Activities and Corey Union Office staff and University Police Department personnel will assist program sponsors in organizing a well-run, enjoyable event. In order for this to occur, every member of the College community must help by following appropriate planning practices.

440.14 GUIDELINES FOR SPONSORING CAMPUS EVENTS REQUIRING EXTRAORDINARY SECURITY ARRANGEMENTS

From time to time campus organizations sponsor events that tend to generate a great deal of controversy within the community. These situations often require special attention, not only from the sponsor, but from the College, since these programs may create an environment that may threaten the safety of those attending and/or involved.

The following guidelines are established for the handling of this type of event. The use of the term "speaker" in these guidelines refers to all speakers, artists, entertainers or other forms of presentations that may require the measures herein specified. Additionally, although an event may not include a form of presentation, the nature of the event itself may be such as to require the implementation of some of the procedures listed below.

Implementation of the guidelines, and other measures deemed necessary, may be recommended by the chief of university police (and/or other College officials who may have responsibility for the management of events or facilities) to the president of the College or his/her designee. Upon determination by the president or his/her designee that these measures are necessary, the guidelines should be discussed thoroughly with the sponsoring group. A copy of these guidelines should be given to the group well in advance of the event.

A. Agreement with speaker: these guidelines must be discussed with the speaker and agreed to prior to the event.

  1. No speaker or member of speaker's staff shall bring onto the campus any form of weapon or firearm.
  2. Prior to the event, the speaker and the speaker's staff shall agree to a personal search by University Police Department staff to ensure the absence of weapons and/or firearms. This may include the use of metal detection devices.
  3. Before, during or after the presentation, neither the speaker nor any member of the speaker's staff shall threaten, intimidate or physically approach or come into contact with any member of the audience or member of the College community.

B. Responsibilities of the sponsor

1. Scheduling of an event.

  1. All facilities should be reserved through established campus procedures.
  2. Early in the planning process, the sponsoring organization shall contact the Public Relations Office for media releases.
  3. Any small group meetings with the speaker prior to or following the presentation shall take place in a sponsor's office or scheduled facility to avoid hallway discussions or encounters that may become disruptive.
  4. The sponsor shall be responsible for providing the appropriate administrative officers with a full and complete itinerary of the speaker's visit at least 10 days prior to the event. This should include the speaker's time of arrival on campus, his/her housing arrangements as necessary, and a complete schedule of activities including dates, times, and locations for all meetings, presentations, etc. involving the speaker.
  5. The sponsor shall discuss these guidelines and all security arrangements with University Police Department at least 10 days prior to the event and will assume the cost of officers and special equipment determined by University Police Department to be necessary to assist with the event, including outside police agencies as required. In all cases where private or personal security agents will accompany persons appearing on campus, at least one member of the University Police Department staff shall be present to ensure compliance with College policy.
  6. Failure to provide timely notice to the University Police Department of an event that includes the presence of private or personal security agents or that may create an environment that threatens the personal safety of those attending or involved may result in cancellation of the event and/or the denial of future access to College facilities by the sponsor and may result in the sponsor being responsible for the expense of officers necessary to work the event. University Police Department will have sole responsibility for security at the event.
  7. If deemed necessary, University Police Department will secure the use of metal detectors to monitor those attending the event. A rental charge for use of metal detectors and for the officers who operate them will be charged to the sponsoring group.
  8. If security for the event will include personal searches, as approved by the University Police Department, notice will be included in publicity for the event.

2. Control of the Event

  1. The sponsor shall provide adequate ticket takers and ushers for the event or, depending on the facility, arrange for this service with the building administrator. These individuals shall be clearly identified by name tags, arm bands, or some other visible form of identification. They shall be members of the College community.
  2. Prior to the beginning of an event, those members of the sponsoring group responsible for the conduct of the event shall be introduced and identified to University Police Department staff and administrative officers present.
  3. Ticket takers will ensure that no members of the audience or sponsoring organization bring into the facility any placards on sticks, cans, bottles, or other type of containers. University Police Department personnel may assist in this process.
  4. If deemed necessary, members of the audience and sponsoring group may be prohibited from bringing into the event book bags, or any other items that may be used as, or conceal weapons and/or firearms. Should this action be required, the sponsoring group shall be responsible for establishing a supervised coat-check in close proximity to the event.
  5. Arrangements that are determined to be necessary relative to control of the event (as designated above) must be clearly posted outside the facility at the time of the event and should be made a part of advance advertising.
  6. Ushers shall be responsible for keeping all aisles clear and for following the established guidelines for safety.
  7. In the event of severe heckling from members of the audience, the following steps will be taken.
  8. Ushers shall ask the person or persons involved to cease their activity.
     i. If this request is not respected, a College staff member will intervene.
    ii. In a final effort to control the disruption, the College staff member may ask for assistance from a University Police Department officer.
  9. At no time shall members of the sponsoring organization, ticket takers, ushers or others enter into physical contact with a member of the audience unless directed to do so by a University Police Department officer. Individuals who fail to respond to these attempts to restore order will be asked to leave the event. Failure to comply may result in campus judicial action, arrest or other appropriate action.

C. College expectations

The College has established these guidelines to facilitate the orderly conduct of public events. Both speakers invited to campus and those in attendance at such events should be able to participate in a free and open exchange of ideas. Behavior that makes it impossible to conduct a scheduled event or threatens the safety of participants cannot be permitted.

440.15 FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE

1. Food and beverages served in Corey Union may be served only in areas approved by the building administrator. Food and beverages to be sold must be nonperishable and be approved in advance by ASC.
2. Guidelines for SGA Organization-run Concessions

  1. SGA organization-run concessions are defined as "sales at events which have a specified time period, usually one day, but in some instances a specified event may run over a given number of days."
  2. Requests must be made from bona fide SGA organizations that fall under their insurance protection.
  3. SGA organizations that potentially generate income will be given concession preference; however, other SGA organizations may be allowed to run non-competing products.
  4. If organizations are permitted to run concessions at non-College related programs on campus, any SGA student organization may run the concession on a first-come basis. However, two or more concessions may be run simultaneously if they are non-competing.
  5. If ASC runs a food concession, the organizations may not sell food, but may sell other items providing they are not sold in the Campus Store. However, items such as specially imprinted T-shirts or other goods that have meaning for the specific event may be sold.
  6. For permission to be given to sell foods, organizations must comply with the regulations of the state and county sanitary codes and must have a current and valid permit on display. Organizations must also hold current liability insurance through SGA.
  7. Organizations may not use ASC space to sell their goods unless ASC is using the area at the same time and feels the sales will complement each other.
  8. Organizations are responsible for set up and clean up of their work areas and those areas that were made messy due mainly from the products sold.

(Approved by President Clark, Nov. 15, 1979)

440.16 BROWN AUDITORIUM

Event requestors may request the use of Brown Auditorium through EMS. The auditorium should be used only for events that require the capacity or special facilities available. Management of this facility occasionally will require additional approval and labor costs for supervision, technical services, clean up and/or security.

440.17 COREY UNION

Event requestors may request Corey Union space through EMS. Consideration will be given to the size of the group, the availability of the facilities and services, and the nature of the activity in relation to the total Corey Union program. Approval for use must be in the best interest of the College. The use of Corey Union will be refused to any group that abuses the privilege through destruction of property or violation of policies described in the College Handbook. All applications by non-College organizations should be submitted to the director of Corey Union and conferences.

Event requestors may select room setup, food and beverage services, security and technology services when completing the EMS request form. Services may include a charge. The using organization will be billed for these charges at the conclusion of the program. The organization is not to make direct cash payment to janitors, police officers, firefighters, etc.

440.18 STADIUM COMPLEX

The unique nature of this facility, from time to time, demands a certain sensitivity with regard to scheduling. All requests for the use of the Stadium Complex should be submitted through EMS. Certain proposed uses of the Stadium Complex, which may necessitate the rescheduling of routine activities, may require discussion and approval by President's Cabinet.

440.19 FACULTY/STAFF USE OF RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

Faculty and staff and their spouses/dependents are invited to use College recreational facilities during supervised, open recreation hours. Dependents over the age of 18 must be full-time students. For a current open recreation schedule, contact Recreational Sports at 607-753-5585.

  1. In order to provide proper care and control of the recreational facilities, faculty/staff are required to present valid photo ID cards each time they use the facilities.
  2. Upon request, faculty and staff may purchase photo ID cards for spouses and dependents at ASC for a $10 fee per person. Children under 16 years of age must be accompanied by an adult such as a faculty/staff person, spouse, over 16-year-old dependent and each must present a valid SUNY Cortland ID card each time she or he uses the facilities.
  3. All ID cards are nontransferable.
  4. Faculty and staff may invite guests to accompany them in the use of recreational facilities by purchasing a guest pass for $5 per guest per day. Day/guest passes may be purchased at the Recreational Sports office or in the Equipment Checkout Service in Park Center.
  5. Faculty and staff are invited to participate in any intramural sport; however, spouses and dependents are not eligible for intramurals.
  6. Beginning in the Fall 2010 semester, faculty and staff may use the Tomik and Woods fitness facilities free of charge. However, spouses and dependents of faculty/staff must purchase memberships to use the fitness facilities. Dependents must be at least 16 years of age to use the fitness facilities. Faculty/staff may also invite guests to accompany them in the use of the fitness facilities by purchasing a guest pass for $5 per guest per day. Guest passes are purchased at the fitness facility that is visited.
  7. The College allows the domestic partners of faculty/staff and students to obtain a SUNY Cortland identification card, which allows them to use the two fitness facilities and other recreational facilities on campus, consistent with the costs and policies associated with spouse member policies. To qualify for this benefit, the following must be presented:
    • proof of cohabitation;
    • proof of economic interdependency; and
    • the existence of the domestic partnership for at least six (6) months prior to eligibility.

Proof of cohabitation shall consist of lease agreements, rent receipts, mortgage documents, utility bills, etc. Proof of economic interdependency includes joint bank accounts, securities accounts, insurance policies naming each other as beneficiaries, etc. Two proofs of economic dependency are required. Faculty or staff members who seek the use of the fitness facilities for their domestic partner should go to the Human Resources Office to establish eligibility. Students who seek the use of fitness facilities for their domestic partners should go to the Vice President for Student Affairs Office to establish eligibility. Once eligibility is established, the Human Resources Office or student affairs will provide the faculty/staff member or student with an eligibility form to be presented to ASC for authorization to provide the domestic partner with a college identification card, which may then be presented to the Recreational Sports Office or appropriate fitness facility membership.

440.20 SUMMER SPORTS CAMP

The Summer Sports Camp offers sports-related, noncredit camps and clinics on the College campus. The director of athletics is responsible for the planning, scheduling, staffing, promotion, registration and administration of Summer Sports Camp programs. The director works closely with appropriate campus offices to plan for food, housing, and facility use. Summer Sports Camp hires College staff and other qualified professionals to provide quality programs.

440.21 RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR SPECTATOR CONDUCT

A. It is the policy of the College that the following regulations pertaining to the safety and behavior of spectators be observed at all intercollegiate athletic and sport club events.

  1. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited at all events.
  2. All language and behavior deemed offensive to the general public and participants is prohibited at all events.
  3. The use of any musical instruments or noisemaking devices in an unsportsmanlike or disruptive manner is prohibited at all events.
  4. Smoking is prohibited at all indoor events.
  5. Effective Jan. 1, 2013, the College will be designated as a completely tobacco-free campus.

B. Consumption of food and/or nonalcoholic beverages is restricted to designated areas at all indoor events.

  1. Procedure designed to implement the rules and regulations for the conduct of spectators.
  2. Failure to adhere to the stated policies may result in spectators being asked to leave an athletic event.
  3. These rules and regulations are to be announced (as appropriate and needed) over the public address system at all events where such system is used and are to be made available to spectators through announcement in the published program of an athletic event or through the posting of the regulations in appropriate places.

440.22 VISITING SCHOLAR FACILITIES USE

Upon recommendation of the appropriate dean and of the provost, the president may appoint qualified persons to the courtesy position of visiting scholar. This appointment normally carries no specific duties and no compensation and is similar to volunteer status. Working space and reasonable access to scholarly facilities is determined by the appropriate dean on a case-by-case basis.

440.23 DISPLAY OF THE FLAG

State University Administrative Policy, Item 501, page 1, states "The University will display on its several campuses no flag or banner other than the flag of the United States, the flag of the state of New York, the United Nations flag and the Red Cross flag, and the University will not permit the display of any such other flag or banner requiring the use of public facilities or premises of the University."

440.24 LATE NIGHT PROGRAMMING

Periodically, recognized student groups wish to host programs whose hours extend past the normal building closing time. The College will review each program request. It is expected that a full-time SUNY Cortland faculty/staff member be present for the duration of this event. The faculty/staff member will be expected to act in the best interest of the College should any emergency situation arise during the event. It is the duty of the recognized student group to identify and invite the faculty/staff member at least 10 business days before the program. Should a faculty/staff member not be found, the event may not proceed in the planning process. The recognized student group will be responsible for setting up a pre-program meeting with the director of Corey Union and conferences or the associate director of Corey Union and conferences at least 10 business days before the event. At that meeting, the following topics will be discussed and procedures for the event will be decided:

  1. the nature of the event
  2. process for identifying attendees at the event, such as a sign-in sheet
  3. identification of full-time SUNY Cortland faculty/staff member (it would be best if this individual were in attendance at this meeting)
  4. responsibilities of recognized group members during events
  5. clean-up responsibilities

Once all these areas have been approved, the event may proceed. Should the faculty/staff member fail to arrive at the designated time of the event, the event will be immediately cancelled and the building closed.

 440.25 DUTIES OF A BUILDING ADMINISTRATOR

A. Security of the building

  1. Establishes the hours during which the building is to be open.
  2. Receives reports from the University Police Department of open or unlocked doors and windows after the official closing hours and initiates corrective action.
  3. Authorizes the issuance of building entrance and room keys and security codes to qualified permanent or part-time users and maintains building directories.
  4. Responds to door “prop alarms” from the card access system.

B. Utilization of the building: Coordinates the use of space within the building with the registrar and the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office.

C. Maintenance of the building

  1. Approves (computerized) work orders initiated by other offices for room repairs or modifications such as furniture moves.
  2. Coordinates solutions for building problems involving sanitation, plumbing, cleanliness and elevators.
  3. Communicates cleaning and maintenance problems to the supervising custodian in the building and reports to Physical Plant any lack of service by custodians, janitors, maintenance personnel and refuse collectors.

D. Communication liaison

An important function of the building administrator is communication liaison. The following is a list of duties assigned to the building administrator as a liaison between administrative units and building occupants for routine services.

  1. The building administrator arranges for postings containing special information concerning the building or areas of the building to be affixed at entrances and/or the specific area.
  2. The building administrator notifies occupants of impending interruption to public areas/utilities in the building.
  3. The building administrator acts as the primary building point of contact with the following offices:
    • President’s Office
    • University Police Department
    • Facilities Planning, Design and Construction Office
    • Environmental Health and Safety Office
    • Mail Services /Central Warehouse
    • Custodial Services

E. Emergency Preparedness

The following duties are assigned to the building administrator in the role of building emergency preparedness.

  1. Implements building-specific policies and procedures, posts notices, and disseminates information about building preparations, activities, facilities issues and campus programs.
  2. Acts as coordinator for building occupants in a building emergency response, coordinates preparations and activities including fire alarm/evacuation drills with university police.
  3. Works as building liaison to other campus departments and units such as environmental health and safety; Physical Plant; university police; human resources, etc., that provide support, assistance and input to emergency preparedness planning.

F. Receives and forwards to the Alcohol Review Committee any requests for service of alcohol at functions to be held within the building.

G. Environmental safety of the building.

  1. Reports unsafe conditions to Physical Plant or the Environmental Health and Safety Office.
  2. Receives from the Environmental Health and Safety Office notices (and ensures posting of same) concerning removal from localized areas of asbestos and lead-bearing substances.
  3. Channels complaints regarding building temperatures and air flows to the proper office.
  4. Has the discretion upon becoming aware of an odor situation to advise occupants so each may individually determine personal impact. Employee absence or fresh-air break due to odor situation must be approved by immediate supervisor, not the building administrator.
  5. Coordinates the annual fire inspection with the the Environmental Health and Safety Office.

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440.26 USE OF FACILITIES BY THIRD PARTIES FOR FREE SPEECH

The following constitutes the State University of New York College at Cortland’s “time, place and manner” policy on the use of SUNY Cortland-owned (the university) facilities by third parties (non-university or sponsored by recognized student organizations) for free speech purposes as by the University Council pursuant to a delegation of authority by the SUNY Board of Trustees. See SUNY Policy #5603 “Use of Facilities by Non-Commercial Organizations.”

Reasons for this Policy

As an institution of higher education, the university respects and fully supports the rights granted to individuals under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution regarding free speech. The university has adopted free speech policies with respect to its students, faculty, and staff, but not for third parties, who are not sponsored by the university or a recognized student organization, but want to use the campus for free speech purposes.

As a public entity, partially funded by New York state tax dollars, the university will provide a designated public forum to third parties outside of the campus community for their exercise of free speech rights. To comply with existing law, the university recognizes that it will be dedicating its scarce resources to the third parties, including staff time for the management of the designated public forum, the cost associated/loss of revenue with the use of space itself, and possibly utilizing university police and other administrative offices’ staff, to provide for the public safety of participants.

In adopting this policy, the university weighed its competing obligations and responsibilities: to meet its legal obligations as a public entity to provide a designated public forum for free speech by third parties; to meet its audit and control obligations in managing New York state property under its jurisdiction; and to meet its obligations for the orderly and safe operation of its campus, while responsibly managing and allocating its scarce resources in pursuit of its education mission for its students.

Policy Application

This policy shall apply to all third parties, who are not sponsored by the university and/or a student group, who want to use the university’s designated public forum for free speech purposes. This policy does not apply to students, speakers officially sponsored by recognized student groups, faculty or staff as other reservation and use policies apply to those campus community members.

Definitions

Black-out days: The university has blacked-out certain days on its calendar wherein the use of the campus and its facilities, including outdoor spaces are reserved exclusively for campus-related activities that are at the very core of its primary educational mission. During these blackout periods, no third party shall be allowed to use the designated public forum for free speech purposes. The university defines the blackout periods to include the following:

  1. During opening weekend for the commencement of fall and spring semester;
  2. During reading periods and examination periods as set forth on the then-current academic calendar.
  3. During graduation-related activities and events, including undergraduate and graduate commencements;
  4. During major fall or spring campus-wide celebrations, such as concerts, Homecoming, and Spring Fling; and Open Houses.
  5. During such times that the College is hosting major campus events which require significant staff resources such as New York Jets training camp.
  6. During the conservation shut down of educational buildings and administrative offices as defined on its calendar when the temperature of the offices shall be below 60 degrees Fahrenheit — typically between the end of the examination period when students leave campus for the winter holiday break and a few business days after the first of the year. This timeframe is included in the black-out period because the offices are typically closed for the receipt of applications and the campus is virtually vacant to conserve energy and to save money to meet state budget reductions.

Designated Public Forum: The university identifies the following area as its designated public forum: the outside area of Corey Union beginning on the south side of the southern tree, extending 12 feet south on the sidewalk, encompassing a rectangle area that is 10 feet in width.

The university designates this outdoor space for its designated public forum as this space is the most highly pedestrian trafficked area on the university main campus by students, faculty, staff and visitors. Corey Union houses the food court, Dunkin’ Donuts, Friendly’s, the Information Center, as well as several other student services offices, as well as the Function Room and frequently used meeting rooms for the university campus community. The use of this space is also not likely to interfere with classroom instruction or residence halls.

Additionally, the university has identified an outdoor space by the College’s athletic fields. This space is due east of the 281 Parking Lot on the grass area. This area is approximately 20’ by 30’, and is roped off. 

An auxiliary area could also be available should the College deem it necessary. This area would be due east of the Lankler and Stratton intersection. This area will also be roped off, approximately 20’ by 30’. 

These areas are available during the time of Summer Training Camp. Please bring a completed Designated Public Forum application with you and present the document to a person at the Main Gate of Training Camp. The application will be reviewed at this time. If approved, you and/or your group will be escorted to the designated outdoor space. 

A supply of blank Designated Public Forum applications will be available at the front gate of Training Camp. 

Third Party: A person(s) who wants to use the designated public forum for free speech purposes and the person(s) is not a student, faculty or staff member at the university, and the person(s) is not officially sponsored by either the university and/or a recognized student group to speak at the university.

Policy

A. The university is providing a designated public forum for use by third parties for their free speech purposes.

B. Reservation and Recordkeeping of the Use of Space:

1. Third parties who seek to use the designated public forum must:

  1. Complete a designated public forum application (attached); and
  2. File the application with the director/Corey Union office four business days before the date the applicant wishes to use the designated public forum. Applications received after 3 p.m. on a given business day shall be considered as having been received on the morning of the next business day. The applicant assumes responsibility for proper and timely delivery of an application to the director/Corey Union Office. The office is open 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday, for deliveries, except for holidays and certain university black-out days as noted within this document.

2. The university shall review the application and respond to the applicant no later than the close of business on the second business day following the receipt of the application.

  1. If the application is completed fully and signed by the applicant and the date and time are available for use, the university shall inform the applicant of its approval to use the designated forum on the date and time requested.
  2. if the application is not complete and/or it is not signed, the university shall return the application to the applicant for completion. The three business days’ time period will begin running again once the completed and signed application is received by the director/Corey Union Office.
  3. if the space is already reserved to its capacity for the date and time requested, or if the date and time requested is during a blackout period as defined below, the university shall inform the applicant and offer the applicant the next available date and time for the use of the space.

C. The university shall not:

  1. Inquire as the nature or content of the free speech;
  2. Charge the applicant an application fee to reserve the designated public forum;
  3. Charge the applicant/third party for the use of the space;
  4. Impose insurance requirements on the applicant/third party; or
  5. Charge the applicant for any additional costs to the university that the university may incur due to the use of the space by the applicant/third party, such as security.

D. The applicant/third party shall:

  1. Be responsible for any costs for parking on the campus as all students, faculty, staff and visitors are charged for parking.
  2. Be responsible for picking up from the designated public forum any brochures, pamphlets, leaflets or other handouts or goods that the third party speaker brought with him/her to disseminate during his/her speech, and properly disposing of the same in public garbage receptacles or taking them with him/her. The university has a regulation against littering on the campus that applies to all students, faculty, staff and visitors. Failure to comply with this provision may result in future denial of use of the designated public forum; and
  3. Not use megaphone equipment for the amplification of the speech without prior express permission. Determination of permission will be based on the potential disruption of classes or other legitimate business uses.

E. The university reserves the right to terminate any use of the designated public forum in the event either the speaker or a member(s) of any audience engages in conduct that violates the SUNY Rules for the Maintenance of Public Order, adopted in accordance with Education Law Section 6430 and 8 NYCRR 535, in order to secure the orderly and operation of the campus for the safety of the entire campus community.

All applications must be reviewed and approved by the director of Corey Union and conferences, or designee. For questions, please call the Campus Activities Office at 607-753-2322.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, Oct. 4, 2011)

440.27 SUNY CORTLAND REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATION PROCEDURES

I. Introduction

The College has identified two categories of student organizations. Recognized student organizations are governed by the policies found in both the College Handbook and the governing documents of the State University of New York College at Cortland Student Government Association (SGA).

Registered student organizations do not receive funding from the College or through the SGA.

  1. Registered organizations are permitted to have access to College facilities to promote and conduct their activities provided that the organization members and organization abide by the policies and procedures stated within this document, the SUNY Cortland Code of Student Conduct and Related Policies and the College Handbook.
  2. Conduct and behavior of registered student organization members should reflect the above-stated purposes both on and off campus and be consistent with the SUNY Cortland Code of Student Conduct and Related Policies. Violations of the Code of Student Conduct will be addressed pursuant to the processes described in the c ode. Associate members (See Section VI, Membership) would be subject to the appropriate criminal law procedures and inappropriate behavior on their part could jeopardize the status of the organization with the College.
  3. Activities of registered student organizations at SUNY Cortland — involving campus facilities and/or equipment with regard to fundraisers and other activities — will comply with all University Board of Trustees, SUNY Cortland College Council and campus administrative policies and procedures.
  4. For the purposes of local governance of registered student organizations, these policies are applicable to all such organizations regardless of their affiliation, or lack thereof, with any regional, national, or international organization.
  5. Registered student organizations may not reserve College-owned vehicles.
II. Procedures

Duration of Affiliation and Recognition: Recognition for new registered student organizations will be provisional for one full year. After successfully completing one year of provisional recognition, recognition duration will be indefinite and subject to annual review. The vice president for student affairs reserves the right to revoke College recognition if the registered student organization fails to comply with any of the guidelines set herein.

1. Registered student organizations must file with the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office, the following items:             

  1. Completed SUNY Cortland Registered Student Organization Recognition Application
  2. Signed certification of Compliance with Anti-Hazing Laws and Regulations (form included in application)
  3. Signed certification of Compliance with Financial Management Request (form included in application)
  4. A copy of the organization’s current governing documents (constitution, bylaws, policies, regulations, etc.)
  5. A copy of the organization’s official stated purpose (if not included in its governing documents)
  6. A complete listing of current organization officers and their appropriate contact information (forms included in application)
  7. A complete listing of the names and contact information for any additional advisors.

2. Within 14 days of receipt of all materials, the director of Corey Union, campus activities and conferences or his/her designee, will examine the documents submitted. If necessary, a consultation with representatives of the organization will be held to discuss changes, deletions or additions to submitted documents to insure compliance as previously stated.

  1. In cases where certification of registered group permission is granted, the organization will be notified in writing of that decision.
  2. In cases where certification of registered group permission is not granted, the organization will be notified in writing of that decision. Reasons for the non-certification will be specified and an appropriate timetable presented in which to correct these obstacles.
  3. In cases where registered group permission cannot be granted by the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office, the vice president for student affairs, or his/her designee, will serve as the appellate administrator. Groups wishing to appeal the decision must do so, in writing to the vice president for student affairs, within 10 days of the date the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office issues the decision. The vice president for student affairs, or his/her designee, will review all pertinent documents and respond in writing within 30 days.
III. Forming Registered Student Organizations

It should be noted that fraternities and sororities have a different recognition process and are not eligible to be categorized as registered student organizations.

  1. Student representatives wishing to discuss the possibility of establishing a registered student organization at SUNY Cortland must meet with the director of Corey Union, campus activities and conferences, or his/her designee, to discuss appropriate College policies and the purpose of the organization.
  2. After speaking with the aforementioned director, or his/her designee, students wishing to continue the process to be granted permission to operate as a registered student organization must submit a letter requesting that this permission be granted. Along with this letter they must also submit a copy of the organization’s official stated purpose along with all governing documents. All items are to be submitted to the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office.
  3. After submitting the documentation mentioned above the students must also complete and submit a formal SUNY Cortland Registered Student Organization Application, including the name and contact information of their SUNY Cortland-associated advisor.
  4. Permission to operate as a registered student organization at SUNY Cortland requires approval through the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office and the vice president for student affairs. A decision will be reached only after all required documentation has been received and any follow-up conversations deemed necessary are held.
IV. Use of College Facilities

Certification as a registered student organization shall not be construed as conferring any right to use campus facilities that is not in accordance with existing College policies and practices. Facility use and reservations, along with the postings of all events, must comply with existing College policies.

V. Fundraising

Fundraising procedures for registered student organizations are to follow the appropriate College policies as coordinated through the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office.

VI. Membership

Membership in registered student organizations shall be comprised of those graduate and undergraduate students matriculated full or part-time at SUNY Cortland. Community members who wish to associate with the group may do so in an advisory role or as associate members but are not able to reserve College facilities or otherwise act as a representative of the organization. Students from another college/university are not eligible to become members of any registered student organization at SUNY Cortland. Members at all levels will be expected to abide by the procedures established within this document.

VII. Advisors

Each registered student organization is required to have an advisor affiliated with the College and said advisor’s name and contact information must be filed with the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office. The advisor cannot be a student but rather must be currently employed by the College in at least a part-time capacity. It is the responsibility of each organization to find someone willing to serve as their advisor. The advisor will function as a program consultant, resource, provider of continuity and interpreter of College policy. The advisor shall be aware of the organization’s financial status, attend functions and meetings, and assure that adequate records are maintained by the organization. As liaison between the organization and the College, the advisor must maintain consistent communication with the director of Corey Union, campus activities and conferences.

VIII. Officer Requirements

Organization officers must be enrolled for at least one credit hour as students at SUNY Cortland while seeking and holding office.

IX. Hazing Laws and Regulations

Hazing and/or harassment of members is strictly prohibited as stipulated by New York state law and the State University of New York Board of Trustees rules for the maintenance of public order. Additional clarifying information can be found within the SUNY Cortland Code of Student Conduct and Related Policies manual. All registered student organizations on the SUNY Cortland campus shall file with the Campus Activities and Corey Union Office a Certification of Compliance with Anti-Hazing Laws and Regulations. All registered student organizations are subject to College and/or New York state disciplinary action on any violation of existing hazing policies.
(Implemented Spring 2011)

(Chapter 440 revisions approved by President's Cabinet, June 25, 2012)

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CHAPTER 441: Facilities Historical Preservation Committee

441.01 GENERAL PURPOSE

The purpose of this committee is to ensure that the history of the College is preserved and accurately maintained. Specifically, this committee will work with the Facilities Master Plan Oversight Committee and the Facilities Planning, Design and Construction Office when a building or other space on campus is being renovated or constructed.

The committee will be responsible for reviewing all space within a facility that is to be renovated or constructed to ensure that any named spaces are preserved and re-named or appropriate new names developed after renovation or new construction is completed.

441.02 COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

The committee membership is recommended as follows:

  • Director of Alumni Affairs
  • Vice President for Institutional Advancement (chair)
  • Director of Public Relations
  • Director of Marketing
  • Director of Facilities Management
  • Facilities Master Plan Oversight Committee Chair
  • College Archivist

(Approved by President's Cabinet, July 14, 2008)

CHAPTER 442: Change of Office or Department Name

A strict timeline must be followed to petition for a change in the name of a current campus office or academic department.

The petitioner must present a detailed rationale for the proposed name change to the supervising academic dean or vice president for review no later than March 1 of any given calendar year.

If the proposal is endorsed, the academic dean or vice president must forward the recommendation and supporting materials to the President's Cabinet for its review no later than April 1.

The President's Cabinet must grant its endorsement no later than May 1 for the name change to take effect on July 1 of that year.

Once approved by the President's Cabinet, the new name will be formally announced to the campus community by the President's Office.

The new name will subsequently appear in all College publications, communications, on the website and signage. If the timeline deadline is not met, petitioners may submit their proposal for consideration for the following year.

A checklist to help ensure that the new name will appear in all College publications, communications, on the website and on signage can be found in the Communication Guide.

(Approved by President's Cabinet, February 2009) 

CHAPTER 450: Policy on Lending College Property

The primary purpose of College-owned or controlled assets is to support the College Mission. Loans will be permitted only when such action supports a mission goal or objective.

SUNY Cortland has a fiduciary responsibility for safeguarding of assets and an obligation to its public. That responsibility is fulfilled through management and maintenance of its Property Control System (PCS) and more informally for all property through the explicit and implicit responsibilities of its departmental managers and employees. Certain inventoried property is formally tagged with a PCS Asset Number (property valued at $5,000 or more).

The following guidelines apply for lending property:

  1. Property may be lent/borrowed only when such action supports the College Mission and does not impair the activities and programs supporting the College.
  2. Implicit in lending/borrowing is that the property be returned in a timely manner in essentially the same condition as when borrowed. There normally should be no cost incurred by the College, including transport from and return to the College.
  3. Accountability for formally inventoried equipment through the PCS rests with the departmental account manager. Control and accountability for lending of other property also rests with the departmental manager who will act in a responsible, prudent manner and exercise sufficient control and documentation to ensure proper internal control in safeguarding assets and not impairing program activities.
    This does not restrict higher-level supervisors from exercising control and oversight at their discretion.
  4. Interdepartmental transfers of inventoried (PCS) equipment is to occur through formal PCS action. However, short-term transfers may be treated as loaning, provided prudent control and documentation steps are taken.
  5. The standard form for the Loan of College Property in Support of the College Mission must be used, and the appropriate authorization must be obtained prior to lending the property.  While control and identification of all lent property is the responsibility of the department manager, please note that for inventoried (PCS) equipment, the form becomes an official document link for property control and may be audited upon request by the property control officer or other authorized officer. 
  6. A certificate of insurance must be obtained when the estimated value of the property exceeds $1,500. In addition, a certificate of insurance for the transporter also must be obtained when the transporter is not the borrowing organization and when the estimated value exceeds $1,500.

CHAPTER 455: Building Hours

Introduction

In an effort to formalize current and past practices, the president established an ad-hoc committee whose task was to recommend specific hours for each building on campus. Formal hours are needed for the myRedDragon Room Reservation System and to ensure safety on campus.

Weekday Hours

  • The standard building operating hours during the academic year are 7 a.m.-9:30 p.m. for academic buildings with some exceptions of buildings hosting athletics, recreation, student activities and Memorial Library. Standard building hours are posted on entrances and exceptions may be found on the Web.
  • The standard hours for administrative buildings are 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
  • Residence halls are secured 24 hours per day, seven days per week. In the event that classroom instruction is held in a residence hall, security of the residents and building will not be compromised.

Weekend Hours

On the weekend, all buildings will remain closed unless otherwise scheduled. Standard building hours are posted on entrances and exceptions may be found on the Web. Academic and administrative buildings will be available to students, faculty or staff who have key or card access.    

Winter Session/Summer Session/Break Hours

Generally, all buildings are open between 7 a.m.-5 p.m., unless otherwise posted. Please check the class schedule for classroom locations.

After Hours Requests

When an individual attempts to schedule an area outside of the normal operating hours, the campus space reservation system will not allow them to reserve the space, but will refer them to contact The Help Center. After-hours access for contractors will be permitted only through prior arrangement with the Facilities Planning, Design and Construction Office, Physical Plant or Information Resources.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum, June 17, 2014)

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CHAPTER 460: Public Information

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), The Freedom of Information Law (FOIL), College Mailing Lists

460.01 PURPOSE OF RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT

The “Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974” (FERPA)
(P.L. 93-380, as amended by Senate Joint Resolution 40) provides for procedures that protect the rights of students in access to students’ educational records.

460.02 DEFINITION OF STUDENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF ACCESS TO RECORDS

Any person who is attending or has attended SUNY Cortland and has an educational or personally identifiable record with the Registrar's Office or any other office listed in 460.04.

460.03 STUDENT RIGHTS TO RECORDS

Students have the right to examine their educational and personally identifiable record and no record may be given out to a third party except upon written consent of the student. (Note exceptions in 460.04 and 460.05.)

460.04 STUDENT RECORDS

Records over which a student may exercise his or her rights include all records, files, documents and other materials that are maintained by the offices listed hereafter. A student may inspect, challenge and refuse to release to third parties all those records that are maintained in these offices.

  1. Student Financial Aid Records (Financial Aid Office)
  2. Credential File (Career Services Office)
  3. Transcript of Academic Record (registrar)
  4. Academic Records (school deans, department chairs and registrar)
  5. College Financial Records (Student Accounts Office)
  6. Student Discipline Records (Student Conduct, vice president for student affairs)

Exceptions: Certain records are excluded from the student's right of access and challenge. These records are:

  1. Institutional records that are in the sole possession of the maker and that are not accessible to any other person except a substitute.
  2. Certain law enforcement records that are segregated from other student records, to which only law enforcement personnel have access.
  3. Employee records of non-student employees.
  4. Medical or paramedical records used only for treatment purposes and not available to third parties.
  5. Confidential letters and statements of recommendation that were placed in the student's educational records before Jan. 1, 1975, provided they are used only for those purposes for which they were specifically intended.
  6. Financial records of the student's parents.

(Ref: 438(a)(1)(4)(B)(i); Fed. Reg. 1210 Section 99.3)

460.05 RELEASE OF STUDENT RECORDS

Release of records to a third party is prohibited unless student consent is given in writing and is on file.

Exceptions:
  1. School officials, SUNY System Administration and other SUNY colleges who have been determined to have legitimate educational interests;
  2. Officials of other schools in which the student seeks to enroll provided the student is given a copy of the record if he or she desires;
  3. Authorized representatives of certain state and federal agencies where such access is necessary to evaluate federally funded programs and the collection of personally identifiable data is specifically allowed by federal law;
  4. In connection with students' application for, or receipt of, financial aid;
  5. Research organizations conducting studies for the educational institution in relation to predictive tests, administering student aid programs, or instruction, if the records are destroyed when no longer needed in the research, and identification of students or parents by persons outside the research organization is not permitted;
  6. Accrediting organizations, solely to carry out their accrediting functions;
  7. Parents of dependent students if the students are listed as deductible dependents for income tax purposes;
  8. In connection with an emergency where release of records is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or others;
  9. “Directory Information” which means a student's name, address, email address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, photographs, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student.

(20 U.S.C. 1232g (a) (5) (A))

460.06 RECORD OF FILE ACCESS

The College is required to maintain a record that will indicate all individuals, agencies or organizations that have requested or obtained access to a student's educational files. This record will indicate the legitimate interest of the requesting party and will be available only to the student and to those responsible for maintaining the record. The sole exception to this requirement is that school officials, including teachers, within the educational institution or local educational agency as listed in 460.05 (a) need not be indicated on this record when requesting data.

460.07 WAIVER OF RIGHT TO INSPECT CONFIDENTIAL RECOMMENDATIONS

Letters of recommendation received by the College prior to Jan. 1, 1975 will be considered confidential and will not be included for student review. Letters received after Jan. 1, 1975 may be inspected by the student. An exception to the provision provides an opportunity for the student to sign a "waiver of right to inspect" statement to accompany requests from individuals for letters of recommendation. This "waiver" notifies the writer of the letter that the recommendation will be confidential and will not be reviewed by the student.

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460.08 RIGHT OF HEARING

The student has a right to a hearing to challenge the content of any record and may seek the correction or deletion of any entry deemed inaccurate or misleading or inappropriate. A hearing will be arranged for the student upon request in writing to the vice president for student affairs.

460.09 GENERAL PROVISIONS

  1. Personally identifiable records will be duplicated on written request of the student at a charge of 15 cents per page. Payment must be received prior to delivery of records. Preparation of these records will be accomplished within a reasonable length of time not to exceed 45 days.
  2. Students whose records are requested by judicial order or subpoena will be notified by the College before complying with the orders. It is understood that in the case of a student no longer attending State University of New York College at Cortland, notification may not be possible where no current address is listed with the College. In such cases, the College cannot evade its obligation under state law to provide the Court with the information and the actual notice must yield in this instance.
  3. Those having questions regarding the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 should contact the Registrar's Office at 607-753-4702.

460.10 NOTIFICATION OF PARENTS OF DISCIPLINARY ACTION

A. Policy

The Vice President for Student Affairs Office may notify the parents of dependent students who have had disciplinary sanctions placed on them.

B. Declaring Independence
  1. 1. All undergraduate students enrolled at Cortland will be considered by the College to be dependent unless they have filed a "Certification of Independent Status" form with the Financial Aid Office declaring their emancipation.
  2. 2. Any student who has not declared his/her emancipation prior to a disciplinary hearing will be given five days after the hearing to file a "Certification of Independent Status" form with the Financial Aid Office.
C. Notification Process
  1. Parental notification will consist of a copy of the decision letter sent to the student and a cover letter to the parents (and, at the discretion of the vice president for student affairs, any other written materials deemed informative).
  2. This notification will occur once the imposed sanctions are final, at the expiration of any appeals process and will be limited to cases brought before the Student Conduct Board, College Hearing Panel and administrative hearings held at those levels as well disciplinary conferences that result in any type of probationary status. Cases handled by a residence hall director are normally excluded from the notification process (except for cases involving alcohol policy violations). Exceptions may also be made for repeated, minor offenses by a dependent student on any type of probation that could result in removal from the residence hall or other campus housing. In these cases, the residence hall director will consult with the student conduct officer in making the decision to notify the parents.
  3. In disciplinary cases that involve a student who engages in behavior that poses a serious threat to one's own physical or emotional safety or the physical or emotional safety of others, the director of student conduct or his/her designee shall notify the parents of dependent students.

460.11 PURPOSE OF THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION LAW

The Freedom of Information Law, enacted in 1974 and significantly revised, effective Jan. 1, 1976, reaffirms your right to know how your government operates. It provides rights of access to records reflective of governmental decisions and policies that affect the lives of every New Yorker. The law establishes the Committee on Open Government, which is responsible for issuing advisory opinions to agencies and the public on compliance with the law.

Scope of the Law

The law defines "agency" to include all units of state and local government in New York State, including state agencies, public corporations and authorities, as well as any other governmental entities performing a governmental function for the state or for one or more units of local government in the state (section 86(3)).

The term "agency" does not include the State Legislature or the courts. As such, for purposes of clarity, "agency" will be used hereinafter to include all entities of government in New York, except the State Legislature and the courts.

What is a Record?

The law defines "record" as "any information kept, held, filed, produced or reproduced by, with or for an agency or the state Legislature, in any physical form whatsoever. …" (Section 86(4)). Thus it is clear that items such as tape recordings, microfilm and computer discs fall within the definition of "record."

460.12 ACCESSIBLE RECORDS

The law states that all records are accessible, except records or portions of records that fall within one of nine categories of deniable records (section 87(2)).

Deniable records include records or portions thereof that:

  1. are specifically exempted from disclosure by state or federal statute;
  2. would if disclosed result in an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy;
  3. would if disclosed impair present or imminent contract awards or collective bargaining negotiations;
  4. are trade secrets or are submitted to an agency by a commercial enterprise or derived from information obtained from a commercial enterprise and which if disclosed would cause substantial injury to the competitive position of the subject enterprise;
  5. are compiled for law enforcement purposes and which if disclosed would:
    i. interfere with law enforcement investigations or judicial proceedings;
    ii. deprive a person of a right to a fair trial or impartial adjudication;
    iii. identify a confidential source or disclose confidential information relative to a criminal investigation; or
    iv. reveal criminal investigative techniques or procedures, except routine techniques and procedures;
  6. would if disclosed endanger the life or safety of any person;
  7. are inter-agency or intra-agency communications, except to the extent that such materials consist of:
    i. statistical or factual tabulations or data;
    ii. instructions to staff that affect the public;
    iii. final agency policy or determinations; or
    iv. external audits, including but not limited to audits performed by the comptroller and the federal government.
  8. are examination questions or answers that are requested prior to the final administration of such questions; or
  9. are computer access codes.

The categories of deniable records are generally directed to the effects of disclosure. They are based in great measure upon the notion that disclosure would in some instances "impair," "cause substantial injury," "interfere," "deprive," "endanger," etc. This represents a significant change from the thrust of the original enactment.

One category of deniable records that does not deal directly with the effects of disclosure is exception (g), which deals with inter-agency and intra-agency materials. The intent of the exception is twofold. Memoranda or letters transmitted from an official of one agency to an official of another or between officials within an agency may be denied, so long as the communications (or portions thereof) are advisory in nature and do not contain information upon which the agency relies in carrying out its duties. For example, an opinion prepared by staff that may be rejected or accepted by the head of an agency need not be made available. However, the facts, policies and determinations upon which an agency relies in carrying out its duties should be made available.

There are also special provisions in the law regarding the protection of trade secrets. Those provisions pertain only to state agencies and enable a person submitting records to state agencies to request that records be kept separate and apart from all other agency records on the ground that they constitute trade secrets. In addition, when a request is made for records characterized as trade secrets, the submitter of such records is given notice and an opportunity to justify a claim that the records would if disclosed result in substantial injury to his or her competitive position. A member of the public requesting records characterized as trade secrets or a state agency at any time may challenge a claim that records constitute trade secrets.

Generally, the law provides access to existing records. Therefore, an agency need not create a record in response to a request. Nevertheless, each agency must compile the following records (section 87(3)):

  1. a record of the final vote of each member in every agency proceeding in which the member votes;
  2. a record setting forth the name, public office address, title and salary of every officer or employee of the agency; and
  3. a reasonably detailed current list by subject matter of all records in possession of an agency, whether or not the records are accessible.
Protection of Privacy

One of the exceptions to rights of access, referred to earlier, states that records may be withheld when disclosure would result in "an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy" (section 87(2)(b)).

Unless otherwise deniable, disclosure shall not be construed to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy when identifying details are deleted, when the person to whom a record pertains consents in writing to disclosure, or when upon presenting reasonable proof of identity, a person seeks access to records pertaining to him or her.

460.13 HOW TO OBTAIN RECORDS

Subject Matter List

As noted earlier, each agency must maintain a "subject matter list." The list is not a compilation of every record an agency has in its possession, but rather is a list of the subjects or file categories under which records are kept. It must make reference to all records in possession of an agency, whether or not the records are available. You have a right to know the kinds of records agencies maintain.

The subject matter list must be compiled in sufficient detail to permit you to identify the file category of the records sought. The College maintains a subject matter list that can be obtained from the campus records access officer.

Regulations

The State University has promulgated regulations implementing the law that describe the procedures for obtaining access to University records. A copy of these regulations can be obtained upon request from the campus records access officer.

Designation of Records Access Officer

Under the regulations, each University campus must designate a records access officer to coordinate a campus' response to public requests for records.

The records access officer is responsible for keeping the subject matter list up to date, assisting you in identifying records sought, making the records promptly available or denying access, providing copies of records or permitting you to make copies, certifying that a copy is a true copy and, if the records cannot be found, certifying either that the campus does not have possession of the requested records or that the campus does have the records, but they cannot be found after diligent search.

The regulations also state that the public shall continue to have access to records through officials who have been authorized previously to make information available.

Requests for Records

Requests for access to or copies of records must be in writing and must reasonably describe the records request.

Within five business days of the receipt of a written request for a record reasonably described, the campus must make the record available, deny access in writing giving the reasons for denial, or furnish a written acknowledgment of receipt of the request and a statement of the approximate date when the request will be granted or denied.

Fees

Copies of records must be made available on request. Except when a different fee is prescribed by statute, the campus may not charge for inspection, certification or search for records, or charge in excess of 25 cents per photocopy up to 9 by 14 inches (section 87(1)(b)(iii)). Fees for copies of other records may be charged based upon the actual cost of reproduction. If the campus has no photocopying equipment, a transcript of records must be made on request. However, you may be charged for the clerical time involved.

Denial of Access and Appeal

A denial of access must be in writing, stating the reason for the denial and advising you of your right to appeal to the head or governing body of the campus or the person designated to hear appeals by the head or governing body of the campus. You may appeal within 30 days of a denial.

Upon receipt of the appeal, the campus head, governing body or appeals officer has 10 business days to fully explain in writing the reason for further denial of access or to provide access to the records. Copies of all appeals and the determinations thereon must be sent by the campus to the Committee on Open Government (section 89(4)(a)). This requirement will enable the committee to monitor compliance with law and intercede when a denial of access may be improper.

You may seek judicial review of a final campus denial by means of a proceeding initiated in Article 78 of the Civil Practice Law and Rules. When a denial is based upon one of the exceptions to rights of access that were discussed earlier, the campus has the burden of proving that the record sought falls within one or more of the exceptions (section 89(4)(b)).

A new provision in the Freedom of Information Law permits a court, in its discretion, to award reasonable attorney's fees when a person challenging a denial of access to records in court substantially prevails. To award attorney's fees, a court must find that the record was of "clearly significant interest to the general public" and that the campus "lacked a reasonable basis at law for withholding the record." While a court may award attorney's fees, such an award is not mandatory.

Public Notice

The regulations require that each campus post conspicuously and/or publicize in a local newspaper:

  • locations where records are made available;
  • the name, title, business address and telephone number of the records access officer; and
  • the right to appeal a denial of access and the name and business address of the person or body to whom appeals should be directed.

The records access officer of SUNY Cortland is:

Public Relations Director
P.O. Box 2000
Cortland, NY 13045
607-753-2232

460.14 COLLEGE MAILING LISTS

In considering the use of campus mailing lists and computer-generated labels, individuals or organizations requesting such service must contact the appropriate campus office for approval. Jurisdiction of campus mailing lists is assigned accordingly:

  Alumni   Alumni Affairs Office
  Faculty   Human Resources Office
  Parents   Vice President for Institutional Advancement Office
  Staff   Human Resources Office
  Students   Registrar's Office

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CHAPTER 470: Maintenance of Public Order

470.01 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The following rules are adopted in compliance with section 6450 of the Education Law and shall be filed with the commissioner of education and the Board of Regents on or before July 20, 1969, as required by that section. Said rules shall be subject to amendment or revision and any amendments or revisions thereof shall be filed with the commissioner of education and Board of Regents within 10 days after adoption. Nothing herein is intended, nor shall it be construed, to limit or restrict the freedom of speech nor peaceful assembly. Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the objectives of a higher educational institution. Similarly, experience has demonstrated that the traditional autonomy of the educational institution (and the accompanying institutional responsibility for the maintenance of order) is best suited to achieve these objectives. These rules shall not be construed to prevent or limit communication between and among faculty, students and administration, or to relieve the institution of its special responsibility for self regulation in the preservation of public order. Their purpose is not to prevent or restrain controversy and dissent, but to prevent abuse of the rights of others and to maintain that public order appropriate to a college or university campus without which there can be no intellectual freedom and they shall be interpreted and applied to that end.

470.02 APPLICATION OF RULES

These rules shall apply to all state-operated institutions of the State University except as provided in Part 550 as applicable to the State University Maritime College. These rules may be supplemented by additional rules for the maintenance of public order heretofore or hereafter adopted for any individual institution, approved and adopted by the State University Trustees and filed with the commissioner of education and Board of Regents, but only to the extent that such additional rules are not inconsistent herewith. The rules hereby adopted shall govern the conduct of students, faculty and other staff, licensees, invitees and all other persons, whether or not such rules are applicable and also upon or with respect to any other premises or property, under the control of such institution, used in its teaching, research, administrative, service, cultural, recreational, athletic and other programs and activities, provided, however, that charges against any student for violation of these rules upon the premises of any such institution other than the one at which he is in attendance shall be heard and determined at the institution in which he is enrolled as a student.

470.03 PROHIBITED CONDUCT

No person, either singly or in concert with others, shall:

  1. Willfully cause physical injury to any other person, nor threaten to do so for the purpose of compelling or inducing such other person to refrain from any act that he has a lawful right to do or to do any act that he has a lawful right not to do.
  2. Physically restrain or detain any other person, nor remove such person from any place where he is authorized to remain.
  3. Willfully damage or destroy property of the institution or under its jurisdiction, nor remove or use such property without authorization.
  4. Without permission, expressed or implied, enter into any private office of an administrative officer, member of the faculty or staff member.
  5. Enter upon and remain in any building or facility for any purpose other than its authorized uses or in such manner as to obstruct its authorized use by others.
  6. Without authorization, remain in any building or facility after it is normally closed.
  7. Refuse to leave any building or facility after being required to do so by an authorized administrative officer.
  8. Obstruct the free movement of persons and vehicles in any place to which these rules apply.
  9. Deliberately disrupt or prevent the peaceful and orderly conduct of classes, lectures and meetings or deliberately interfere with the freedom of any person to express his views, including invited speakers.
  10. Knowingly have in his possession upon any premises to which these rules apply, any air or BB gun, rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver, or other firearm weapon without the written authorization of the chief administrative officer whether or not a license to possess the same has been issued to such person.
  11. Willfully incite others to commit any of the acts herein prohibited with specific intent to procure them to do so.
  12. Take any action, create, or participate in the creation of any situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or that involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization.

470.04 FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND ASSEMBLY: PICKETING AND DEMONSTRATIONS

  1. No student, faculty or other staff member or authorized visitor shall be subject to any limitation or penalty solely for the expression of his views nor for having assembled with others for such purpose. Peaceful picketing and other orderly demonstrations in public areas of ground and building will not be interfered with. Those involved in picketing and demonstrations may not, however, engage in specific conduct in violation of the provisions of the preceding section.
  2. In order to afford maximum protection to the participants and to the institutional community, each state-operated institution of the State University shall promptly adopt and promulgate, and thereafter continue in effect as revised from time to time, procedures appropriate to such institution for the giving of reasonable advance notice to such institution of any planned assembly, picketing or demonstration upon the grounds of such institution, its proposed locale and intended purpose, provided, however, that the giving of such notice shall not be made a condition precedent to any such assembly, picketing or demonstration and provided, further that this provision shall not supersede nor preclude the procedures in effect at such institution for obtaining permission to use the facilities thereof.

470.05 PENALTIES

A person who shall violate any of the provisions of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) shall:

  1. If he is a licensee or invitee, have his authorization to remain upon the campus or other property withdrawn and shall be directed to leave the premises. In the event of his failure or refusal to do so he shall be subject to ejection or arrest.
  2. If he is a trespasser or visitor without specific license or invitation, be subject to ejection.
  3. If he is a student, be subject to expulsion or such lesser disciplinary action as the facts of the case may warrant, including suspension, probation, loss of privileges, reprimand or warning.
  4. If he is a faculty member having a term or continuing appointment, be guilty of misconduct and be subject to dismissal or termination of his employment or such lesser disciplinary action as the facts may warrant including suspension without pay or censure.
  5. If he is a staff member in the classified service of the civil service, described in section 75 of the Civil Service Law, be guilty of misconduct and be subject to the penalties prescribed in said section.
  6. If he is a staff member other than one described in subdivisions (d) and (e), be subject to dismissal, suspension without pay or censure.

470.06 PROCEDURES FOR VIOLATIONS

  1. The chief administrative officer or his designee shall inform any licensee or invitee who shall violate any provisions of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) that his license or invitation is withdrawn and shall direct him to leave the campus or other property of the institution. In the event of his failure or refusal to do so such officer shall cause his ejection from such campus or property.
  2. In the case of any other violator, who is neither a student nor faculty or other staff member, the chief administrative officer or his designee shall inform him that he is not authorized to remain on the campus or other property of the institution and direct him to leave such premises. In the event of his failure or refusal to do so, such officer shall cause his ejection from such campus or property. Nothing in this subdivision shall be construed to authorize the presence of any such person at any time prior to such violation nor to affect his liability to prosecution for trespass or loitering as prescribed in the Penal Law.
  3. In the case of a student, charges for violation of any of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) shall be presented and shall be heard and determined in the manner hereinafter provided in section 535.9 of the Part.
  4. In the case of a faculty member having a continuing or term appointment, charges of misconduct in violation of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) shall be made, heard and determined in accordance with title D of Part 338.
  5. In the case of any staff member who holds a position in the classified civil service, described in section 75 of the Civil Service Law, charges of misconduct in violation of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) shall be made, heard and determined as prescribed in that section.
  6. Any other faculty or staff member who shall violate any provision of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) shall be dismissed, suspended or censured by the appointing authority prescribed in the policies of the board of trustees.

470.07 ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM

  1. The chief administrative officer shall be responsible for the enforcement of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) and he shall designate the other administrative officers who are authorized to take action in accordance with such rules when required or appropriate to carry them into effect.
  2. It is not intended by any provision herein to curtail the right of students, faculty or staff to be heard upon any matter affecting them in their relations with the institution. In the case of any apparent violation of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) by such persons, which, in the judgment of the chief administrative officer or his designee, does not pose any immediate threat of injury to person or property, such officer may make reasonable effort to learn the cause of the conduct in question and to persuade those engaged therein to desist and to resort to permissible methods for the resolution of any issues that may be presented. In doing so, such officer shall warn such persons of the consequences of persistence in the prohibited conduct, including their ejection from any premises of the institution where their continued presence and conduct is in violation of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules).
  3. In any case where violation of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) does not cease after such warning and in other cases of willful violation of such rules, the chief administrative officer or his designee shall cause the ejection of the violator from any premises that he occupies in such violation and shall initiate disciplinary action as herein before provided.
  4. The chief administrative officer or his designee may apply to the public authorities for any aid that he deems necessary in causing the ejection of any violator of these rules (or of the rules of any individual institution supplementing or implementing these rules) and he may request the State University counsel to apply to any court of appropriate jurisdiction for an injunction to restrain the violation or threatened violation of such rules.

470.08 COMMUNICATION

In matters of the sort to which these rules are addressed, full and prompt communication among all components of the institutional community, faculty, students and administration, is highly desirable. To the extent that time and circumstances permit, such communication should precede the exercise of the authority, discretion and responsibilities granted and imposed in these rules. To these ends each state-operated institution of the State University shall employ such procedures and means, formal and informal, as will promote such communication.

470.09 NOTICE, HEARING AND DETERMINATION OF CHARGES AGAINST STUDENTS

  1. The term "chief administrative officer," as used in these rules, shall be deemed to mean and include any person authorized to exercise the powers of that office during a vacancy therein or during the absence or disability of the incumbent and for purposes of this section shall also include any designee appointed by said officer.
  2. Whenever a complaint is made to the chief administrative officer of any state-operated institution of the University of a violation by a student or students of the rules prescribed in this Part (or of any rule adopted by an individual institution supplementing or implementing such rules) or whenever he has knowledge that such a violation may have occurred, he shall cause an investigation to be made and the statements of the complainants, if any, and of other persons having knowledge of the facts reduced to writing. If he is satisfied from such investigation and statements that there is reasonable ground to believe that there has been such a violation he shall prepare or cause to be prepared charges against the student or students alleged to have committed such violation which shall state the provision prescribing the offense and shall specify the ultimate facts alleged to constitute such offense.
  3. Such charges shall be in writing and shall be served on the student or students named therein by delivering the same to him or them personally, if possible, or, if not, by mailing a copy of such charges by registered mail to such student or students at his or their usual place or places of abode while attending college and also to his or their home address or addresses, if different.
  4. The notice of charges so served shall fix a date for hearing thereon not less than 10 nor more than 15 days from the date of service which shall be the date of mailing where necessary to effect service by mail. Failure to appear in response to the charges on the date fixed for hearing, unless there has been a continuance for good cause shown, shall be deemed to be an admission of the facts stated in such charges and shall warrant such action as may then be appropriate thereon. Before taking such action the hearing committee, hereinafter referred to, shall give notice to any student, who has failed to appear, in the manner prescribed in subdivision (c), of its proposed findings and recommendations to be submitted to the chief administrative officer and shall so submit such findings and recommendations 10 days thereafter unless the student has meanwhile shown good cause for his failure to appear, in which case a date for hearing shall be fixed.
  5. Upon demand at any time before or at the hearing the student charged or his representative, duly designated, shall be furnished a copy of the statements taken by the chief administrative officer in relation to such charges and with the names of any other witnesses who will be produced at the hearings in support of the charges, provided, however, that this shall not preclude the testimony of witnesses who were unknown at the time of such demand.
  6. The chief administrative officer may, upon the service of charges, suspend the student named therein from all or any part of this institution's premises or facilities, pending the hearing and determination thereof, whenever, in his judgment, the continued presence of such student would constitute a clear danger to himself or to the safety of persons or property on the premises of the institution or would pose an immediate threat of disruptive interference with the normal conduct of the institution's activities and functions, provided, however, that the chief administrative officer shall grant an immediate hearing on request of any student so suspended with respect to the basis for such suspension.
  7. There shall be constituted at each state-operated institution a hearing committee to hear charges against students of violation of the rules for maintenance of public order prescribed by or referred to in this Part. Such committee shall consist of three members of the administrative staff and three members of the faculty, designated by the chief administrative officer, and three students who shall be designated by the members named by the chief administrative officer. Each such member shall serve until his successor or replacement has been designated. No member of the committee shall serve in any case where he is a witness or is or has been directly involved in events upon which the charges are based. In order to provide for cases where there may be such a disqualification and for cases of absence or disability, the chief administrative officer shall designate an alternate member of the administrative staff and a alternate member of the faculty, and his principal designees shall designate an alternate student member, to serve in such cases. Any five members of the committee may conduct hearings and make findings and recommendations as hereinafter provided. At any institution where the chief administrative officer determines that the number of hearings that will be required to be held is, or may be, so great that they cannot otherwise be disposed of with reasonable speed, he may determine that the hearing committee shall consist of six members of the administrative staff and six members of the faculty to be designated by him and of six students who shall be designated by the members so designated by him. In such event, the chief administrative officer shall designate one of such members as chairman who may divide the membership of the committee into three divisions each to consist of two members of the administrative staff, two faculty members and two students and may assign charges among such divisions for hearing. Any four members of each such division may conduct hearings and make recommendations as hereinafter provided.
  8. The hearing committee shall not be bound by the technical rules of evidence but may hear or receive any testimony or evidence that is relevant and material to the issues presented by the charges and that will contribute to a full and fair consideration thereof and determination thereon. A student against whom the charges are made may appear by and with representatives of his choice. He may confront and examine witnesses against him and may produce witnesses and documentary evidence in his own behalf. There may be present at the hearings: the student charged and his representatives and witnesses; other witnesses; representatives of the institutional administration; and, unless the student shall request a closed hearing, such other members of the institutional community or other persons, or both, as may be admitted by the hearing committee. A transcript of the proceedings shall be made.
  9. Within 20 days after the close of a hearing the hearing committee shall submit a report of its findings of fact and recommendations for disposition of the charges to the chief administrative officer, together with a transcript of the proceedings, and shall at the same time transmit a copy of its report to the student concerned or his representative. Within 10 days thereafter the chief administrative officer shall make his determination thereon. Final authority to dismiss the charges or to determine the guilt of those against whom they are made and to expel, suspend or otherwise discipline them shall be vested in the chief administrative officer. If he shall reject the findings of the hearing committee in whole or in part, he shall make new findings that must be based on substantial evidence in the record and shall include them in the notice of his final determination that shall be served upon the student or students with respect to whom it is made.

470.10 ORGANIZATIONS

Organizations that operate upon the campus of any state-operated institution or upon the property of any state-operated institution used for educational purposes shall be prohibited from authorizing the conduct described in the subdivision (1) of section 535.3.

A. Procedure

The chief administrative officer at each state-operated institution shall be responsible for the enforcement of this section, and, as used herein, the term chief administrative officer shall include any designee appointed by said officer.

  1. Whenever the chief administrative officer has determined on the basis of a complaint or personal knowledge that there is reasonable ground to believe that there has been a violation of this section by any organization, the chief administrative officer shall prepare or cause to be prepared written charges against the organization that shall state the provision proscribing the conduct and shall specify the ultimate facts alleged to constitute such violation.
  2. Such written charges shall be served upon the principal officer of the organization by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, to the organization's current address and shall be accompanied by a notice that the organization may respond in writing to the charges within 10 days of receipt of said notice. The notice of the charge so served shall include a statement that the failure to submit a response within ten 10 days shall be deemed to be an admission of the facts stated in such charges and shall warrant the imposition of the penalty described in subdivision (c) herein. The response shall be submitted to the chief administrative officer and shall constitute the formal denial or affirmation of the ultimate facts alleged in the charge. The chief administrative officer may allow an extension of the 10-day response period.
  3. Upon written request, by an authorized representative of the organization, the chief administrative officer shall provide the representative organization an opportunity for a hearing. A hearing panel designated by the chief administrative officer shall hear or receive any testimony or evidence that is relevant and material to the issues presented by the charge and that will contribute to a full and fair consideration thereof and determination thereon. The organization's representative may confront and examine witnesses against it and may produce witnesses and documentary evidence on its behalf. The hearing panel shall submit written findings of the fact and recommendations for disposition of the charge to the chief administrative officer within 20 days after the close of the hearing.
  4. Final authority to dismiss the charges or to make a final determination shall be vested in the chief administrative officer. Notice of the decision shall be in writing; shall include the reasons supporting such decision; and shall be served on the principal officer of the organization by mail in the manner described in paragraph (2) above within a reasonable time after such decision is made.
B. Penalties

Any organization that authorizes the prohibited conduct described in subdivision (1) of section 535.3 shall be subject to the rescission of permission to operate upon the campus or upon the property of the State-operated institution used for educational purposes. The penalty provided in this subdivision shall be in addition to any penalty that may be imposed pursuant to the Penal Law and any other provision of law, or to any penalty to which an individual may be subject pursuant to this Part.

C. Bylaws

Section 6450 (1) of the Education Law requires that the provisions of this part which prohibit reckless or intentional endangerment to health or forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization shall be deemed to be part of the bylaws of all organizations that operate upon the campus of any state-operated institution or upon the property of any state-operated institution used for educational purposes. The statute further requires that each such organization shall review these bylaws annually with individuals affiliated with the organization.

D. Distribution

Copies of the provisions of this part which prohibit reckless or intentional endangerment to health or forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization shall be given to all students enrolled in each state-operated institution.

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CHAPTER 480: Procedures for Handling Investigations by State and Federal Agencies

480.01 GENERAL PROCEDURES

In order to standardize procedure for handling investigations by state and federal agencies outside the College (i.e., U.S. Department of Labor, Equal Employment Office, Human Rights Offices, various HEW agencies, etc.), the following procedure will be followed:

  1. The office contacted by a state or federal agency requesting information on employees, review of files of employees, etc., will be referred to the executive assistant to the president.
  2. The nature of the request, the office involved, the source, if possible, whether a subpoena has been issued or under what federal directive or law such an investigation is directed will be determined through consultation with the University Counsel's Office.
  3. After review by the University Counsel's Office procedures will be suggested for handling the agency request.
  4. The President's Office will notify the College office involved and will make the necessary arrangements for satisfying the agent's request. In the event that access to the information is denied, arrangements will be made for the agent to discuss the matter with the University Counsel.
  5. A written report of the investigation, records involved, and information sought from the records, etc. will be completed by the President's Office and a copy filed with the University Counsel's Office.
  6. If the requesting agency has a signed Release of Information Authorization from the person being investigated, then the College may release such information as requested in lieu of the above stated procedure. (See also Directory Information, 460.05)

CHAPTER 481: Fundraising and Solicitation on Campus

481.01 GENERAL PROCEDURES

As established in the College’s Program for Development Planning approved in 1980, the President's Advisory Committee on Development was identified as “the key fundraising policy recommending body” for SUNY Cortland. Among the responsibilities assigned to the Committee are the following:

1) To recommend to the president overall institutional plans and policies regarding fundraising programs, and

2) To review all fundraising efforts for the College community and to evaluate all requests for fundraising projects that originate with faculty/staff members, students, and any campus-related organization, except as noted below.

In accord with the development plan, the Cortland College Foundation and the Alumni Association are recognized as legitimate fundraising agencies operating on behalf of the College. Programs conducted under the sponsorship of these organizations regularly involve College officers in the Division of Institutional Advancement and the President's Office. Together, these two offices provide the leadership for all development activities at the College.

Occasionally, other campus organizations, including student groups operating as part of the Student Government Association (SGA), must raise private money to support their programs and activities. Such College-related organizations intending to raise $1,000 or more are required to obtain approval of fundraising proposals and related promotional materials in advance of any fundraising effort. For student organizations under SGA, the SGA Financial Board, operating in conjunction with the Fundraising Review Committee, will review fundraising proposals. College-related organizations not affiliated with SGA must have proposals reviewed by the Fundraising Review Committee. Both the SGA Financial Board and the President's Fundraising Review Committee will grant approval according to the following criteria:

  1. The organization is a recognized College activity under the sponsorship of the Student Government Association or is part of the College operations at the office or departmental level.
  2. The project to be funded is in itself an outgrowth of the educational mission of the College and its successful undertaking is deemed to assist the College in fulfilling its mission.
  3. The fundraising measures proposed do not interfere with or detract from other development activities on a College-wide basis.
  4. The fundraising project proposed does not interfere with or compete with other established College activities already in place.
  5. The fundraising project proposed does not reflect negatively in any way on the public perception of the College and is in accord with the standards of social behavior endorsed by the College; e.g., the selling and/or raffling of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.

The Fundraising Review Committee is composed of the director of The Cortland Fund, the executive director of ASC and the director of Corey Union and conferences.

481.02 SOLICITING FUNDS ON CAMPUS

SUNY Cortland will permit money to be solicited during a public meeting or entertainment on campus under the following conditions:

  1. Fund raising is stated purpose of those who originally scheduled the event.
  2. The official sponsorship of the event must be by a recognized campus organization or group.
  3. All announcements and advertisements of the event must clearly indicate there will be a solicitation for donations.
  4. Any person or group engaged in fund raising must register with the Vice President for Student Affairs Office and follow the rules found in Chapter 481.

481.03 PERSONS DOING BUSINESS ON CAMPUS

Sales representatives and others desiring to do any type of business involving students of the College community must register in the Vice President for Student Affairs Office, which will consult with organizations and individuals affected when necessary. Organizations financially sponsored by the student government must have approval of the Financial Committee of the student government when profits from sales alter their adopted budgets.

481.04 PRIVATE COMMERCIAL ENTERPRISES ON CAMPUS

No authorization will be given to private commercial enterprises to operate on State University campuses or in facilities furnished by the University other than to provide for food, laundry, dry cleaning, barber and beautician services, cultural events, legal beverages, vending, linen supply and banking. This resolution shall not be deemed to apply to Auxiliary Services Corporation activities approved by the University. (BT, June 29, 1979)

481.05 CAMPUS ADVERTISING POLICY

Advertising on the SUNY Cortland campus or on the College website is permitted within specific guidelines. Non-campus based entities, except parties to contracts with SUNY Cortland or the State of New York that permit them to conduct business on campus, must submit all advertising requests to the vice president for finance and management or the director of Corey Union and conferences for approval. Endorsements by SUNY for any product are strictly prohibited. Advertising in contravention of College policies, rules or codes is prohibited.
 
All agreements between SUNY Cortland and commercial vendors must be in writing and must set forth the cost, duration, size and content of the advertisement. All agreements require payment to SUNY Cortland.
 
SUNY Cortland reserves the right to refuse advertising.
 
(Adopted by President's Cabinet, Aug. 30, 2011)

481.06 VENDOR SOLICITATION ON STATE PROPERTY

Private sector firms and organizations are not permitted access to state property or offices for the purpose of soliciting business from or offering benefits to state employees unless officially sanctioned by the state. Permission to do so for this purpose is not discretionary on the part of agencies and their facility or regional management.

(Governor's Office of Employee Relations, July 23, 2010)

481.07 SOLICITATION

SUNY Cortland will limit credit card solicitation to the holder of the bank contract that exists between SUNY Cortland's ASC and the bank vendor. ASC issues a request for proposals for banking services on a periodic basis and includes limited credit card solicitation as part of the contract. The bank contract holder shall be allowed to solicit in the College union not more than twice a year. Additionally, the following apply:

The bank vendor shall register and receive permission to solicit from the director of Corey Union.
The bank vendor shall not offer gifts for the completion of a credit card application.

This policy complies with the change in the Education Law, section 6437, which mandates a credit card marketing policy.

(Approved by President Bitterbaum, July 20, 2005)

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CHAPTER 482: Direct Access to State University of New York Legal Counsel

482.01 ACCESS TO LEGAL COUNSEL

SUNY employs a regional counsel whose responsibility is to furnish legal advice to the president and other senior administrators and to be present to represent the university when its legal interests are involved (other than those which involve litigation). Access to the university attorney is to be handled according to the following policy.

The president has authorized the following SUNY Cortland administrators to have direct access to the university attorney: the provost and vice president for academic affairs, the vice president for finance and management, the vice president for institutional advancement and the vice president for student affairs. These officers also are permitted to delegate to persons in their areas. In addition, the following officers are hereby authorized to contact the university’s attorney.

President’s Office

  • executive assistant to the president
Division of Academic Affairs
  • associate provost for academic affairs
  • associate provost for enrollment management and marketing
  • associate provost for information resources
  • dean of arts and sciences
  • dean of education
  • dean of professional studies
  • director of international programs
  • director of institutional research and assessment
  • registrar
Division of Student Affairs
  • assistant vice president
  • chief of university police
  • college physician
  • director of counseling and student development
  • director of residence life and housing
  • director of student conduct
Division of Finance and Management
  • affirmative action officer
  • associate vice president for facilities management
  • associate vice president for finance
  • assistant vice president for human resources

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CHAPTER 485: Military Access to Campus

485.01 MILITARY ACCESS TO CAMPUS

Access by the military to campus recruitment facilities and services, including use of career development offices and participation in career days or job fair type programs, must be allowed on the same basis as is provided to other employers. (Gov. Pataki's Executive Order No. 28, April 12, 1996, and amended by the Attorney General on Aug. 8, 1996).

The following situations are governed by existing campus policies related to public access: Request for directory information — release of directory information will be made in accordance with FERPA; the Solomon Amendment; and campus policy. Requests are to be made of the records access officer.

Requests for open or limited public forums — Requests for public access to campus facilities are to be made to the director of Corey Union and conferences and will be treated in the same manner as any other outside organization making such a request (completing appropriate forms for reserving space and paying related fees). As with any other organization, no attempt is made to regulate content.

Requests to post information — All posters displayed on campus must be stamped, "Approved for posting but not for content." Requests for permission to post are to be made to the director of Corey Union and conferences.

(Approved Feb. 14, 1995)

CHAPTER 490: Emergency Closing Policies

490.01 EMERGENCY CLOSING POLICIES

Notification of the campus and the public
When severe weather conditions, power failures or other emergencies force the closing of the SUNY Cortland campus, the College president will contact the provost and the director of public relations to disseminate information about the closing to both the internal and external publics.
The provost is responsible for contacting a) the university police, b) the campus switchboard, c) the Mohawk Valley Graduate Center and d) the Child Care Center. The provost also will send an email to inform the campus community. Cancellation of classes held on campus also applies to online classes (ASYNCH).
The public relations director is responsible for contacting the Central New York media The following radio and television stations will be notified:

  • Cortland: WSUC
  • Homer: WXHC
  • Ithaca: WHCU, WYXL, WQNY, WNYY, WIII
  • Norwich: WCHN, WKXZ, WZOZ, WBKT
  • Owego: WEBO
  • Syracuse: WSYR, WHEN, WYYY, WBBS, WWHT, WPHR, WNDR, WNTQ, WSEN, WFBL, WSTM-TV Ch. 3, WTVH-TV Ch.5, WSYR-TV Ch. 9
  • Waterloo: WNYR, WGVA, WLLW, WAUB, WSFW, WCGR, WFLR
  • Binghamton: WNBF, WHWK, WWYL, WAAL, WSKG, WSQX, WBNG, WBXI

The public relations director will be responsible for posting an alert message on the SUNY Cortland official website. The content of that message will be pre-approved by the president. In addition to the public relations director, the message may be posted by the director of publications and electronic media and the Web communications manager.

In the case of weather-related campus closing, the public relations director will activate the NY-Alert mass notification. An alert will be disseminated via campus cell-phone text messages and campus email to those students, faculty/staff who have registered their contact information. The university police may activate the system in the absence of the public relations director.

For all non-weather-related emergencies, the university police will activate the NY-Alert system. In those instances, the modes of distribution, depending upon the type of emergency, may extend to include cell phone calls and the use of a campus-wide loudspeaker and siren system.

The State of New York has a number of personnel policies that are put into effect at times of emergency situations, such as severe weather conditions or a breakdown in plant operations. It is important that members of the SUNY Cortland staff are aware of these policies so that they know what is expected of them in terms of reporting for work, conducting classes, leaving early and crediting leave time.

The following information concerning state regulations applies to members of the classified staff, professional and teaching staff, and management-confidential. Faculty members should particularly note the reference to class scheduling in item number five.

  1. The only person authorized to close the College is the governor of New York state. It will, therefore, be an extreme condition before the College will be closed because of weather conditions. If an employee is unable to report to work because of weather conditions, the time off must be charged to leave credits, even though local ordinances regarding travel are enacted. Staff members who are essential to such operations of the College should make every effort to report (see number six for definitions of essential personnel).
  2. Severe weather conditions during the working day may cause some employees to request permission from supervisors for early departure. Supervisors, however, are responsible for the continued functioning of offices and departments unless the president or his designee authorizes otherwise. Early departure must be charged to employee leave credits (vacation, personal leave or compensatory time) and the accrual charge slips should be made out before departure. Individual building administrators are not authorized to close buildings under such conditions.
  3. Occasionally, weather conditions may deteriorate so severely that the president or his designee may seek authority from the Governor's Office to close the facility. If authorization is obtained and employees are then directed to leave, the employee is not required to charge the absence to leave credits. This authorized leave may also be obtained during emergency situations such as those resulting from power failures and heating plant breakdowns.
  4. There may be instances of planned shutdown for physical plant purposes such as major electrical, heating plant, or water system repairs. Personnel affected by this work will be given proper advance notification via the President's Office. Employees will be invited to use appropriate accruals, relocated, or be given an accommodation to work.
  5. Since a majority of the College's undergraduate student population resides on campus, it is unlikely that undergraduate courses would be canceled because of weather conditions. Teaching faculty should meet classes even though faced with weather problems in getting to the campus. However, many graduate and adult undergraduate students commute to Cortland for late afternoon and evening classes. When weather causes dangerous traveling conditions, the College may take steps to cancel classes and appropriate announcements will be made through a number of radio stations in the Cortland-Homer-Ithaca-Syracuse-Waterloo-Binghamton-Norwich area. Courses at the 500-level will not be canceled since many undergraduates are enrolled.
    The Mohawk Valley Graduate Center, due to its location in Utica, may experience different weather conditions compared to Cortland. In the case of severe weather conditions in the Utica area, the College may take steps to cancel classes offered at the center.
  6. "Essential personnel" during emergency campus closings is defined according to the nature of the emergency. In all instances, the lists included below may be expanded by the appropriate vice president based on the particular situation:
On-campus emergencies (weather related)

Essential personnel include university police, heating plant staff and all other physical plant employees (unless otherwise directed by supervisor).

On-campus emergencies (non-weather related)

Essential personnel include university police, heating plant staff and Customer Service Center staff.

Non-campus emergencies (when students are in residence)

Essential personnel include university police, heating plant staff, Customer Service Center staff, residence hall directors and ASC staff.

Non-campus emergencies (when students are not in residence)

Essential personnel include university police and heating plant staff (except during summer). Physical plant staffing goes to weekend mode.

(Approved by President′s Cabinet November 2001 and minor revision to weather emergency notification approved by President Bitterbaum Nov. 30, 2009.)

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CHAPTER 495: Policies on Harassment

495.01 POLICY ON HARASSMENT AND VIOLENCE

SUNY Cortland recognizes that it must create an environment where each person's individual dignity will be valued. In a college setting, it is particularly important that there be a respect for diversity and differences of opinion, as the College is dedicated to providing a comprehensive educational experience that prepares individuals to be able to function in a diverse society. Students and employees deserve to be free from fear of harassment or physical abuse. Acts directed against individuals based on race, religion, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation are especially intolerable and will be subject to the strictest of sanctions/penalties. This campus will not accept any behavior that compromises individual dignity or threatens any person's safety. It is, therefore, campus policy that any violations of the below listed restrictions will not be tolerated. These include, but are not limited to:

  1. Attempting or threatening to subject another person to unwanted physical contact.
  2. Directing obscene language or gestures at another person or group of people.
  3. Engaging in actions intended to intimidate or alarm that serve no legitimate purpose.
  4. Directing verbal abuse at another person because the individual is carrying out duties and responsibilities associated with her/his role as faculty, staff, or student staff at the College.
  5. Inflicting bodily harm on any person.
  6. Threatening the use of force on any person.

Also included in these restrictions are any related acts that are violations, misdemeanors or felonies under the law as well as infractions of SUNY and campus policies.

Harassment/violence prevention depends upon the awareness of faculty, staff and students. Compliance with the following procedures, and effective and timely responses to early warning signs and threats, are essential.

  • Faculty and staff should report all harassment, threats or violent incidents to their supervisors. Supervisors should respond to employees within 14 days. Supervisors should also report all incidents to the director of human resources at 607-753-2302. Students should report all harassment, threats or violent incidents to their resident directors or directly to the vice president for student affairs at 607-753-4721. If criminal charges are a consideration, or in situations where a person believes they or others are in immediate danger, University Police should be contacted at 607-753-2111.
  • There will be fair treatment of employees and students involved in harassment, threats or violent incidents. Where appropriate, referral to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) or other organizations established to assist individuals experiencing personal or family crisis situations would occur.
  • Incidents involving harassing, threatening or violent behavior may be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the appropriate bargaining unit agreement or student code of conduct.

Certain complaints under these policies may also be addressed within the State University of New York internal complaint procedures as identified in Chapter 950 of the SUNY Cortland College Handbook. This policy is to be considered for use in addition to other policies prohibiting discrimination contained in the SUNY Cortland College Handbook.

(Approved by President Taylor, April 27, 1999)

495.02 SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

The College's sexual harassment policy is described in detail in 860.01 of this document.

495.03 TITLE IX

A. Law

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. It states:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

(Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and its implementing regulation at 34 C.F.R., Part 106)

Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment, sexual assault and sexual violence.

While it is often associated with athletics programs, the Title IX law is much broader and applies to many programs at SUNY Cortland.

B. Nondiscrimination Notice

Pursuant to State University of New York policy, SUNY Cortland is committed to fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty, staff and students, as well as ensuring equal educational opportunity, employment and access to services, programs and activities, without regard to an individual’s race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status or criminal conviction. Employees, students, applicants or other members of the University community (including but not limited to vendors, visitors, and guests) may not be subjected to harassment that is prohibited by law, or treated adversely or retaliated against based upon a protected characteristic.

SUNY Cortland’s policy is in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and harassment. These laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as Amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law. These laws prohibit discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence.

Inquiries regarding the application of Title IX and other laws, regulations and policies prohibiting discrimination may be directed to Virginia B. Levine, Title IX coordinator, 607-753-2201 or virginia.levine@cortland.edu.

Inquiries also may be directed to the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, 32 Old Slip 26th Floor, New York, NY 10005-2500, 646-428-3800, OCR.NewYork@ed.gov.

C. SUNY Discrimination Complaint Procedure

The University, in its continuing effort to seek equity in education and employment and in support of federal and state anti-discrimination legislation, has adopted a complaint procedure for the prompt and equitable investigation and resolution of allegations of unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, sex, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status, or criminal conviction. Harassment is one form of unlawful discrimination on the basis of the above-protected categories. The University will take steps to prevent discrimination and harassment, to prevent the recurrence of discrimination and harassment, and to remedy its discriminatory effects on the victim(s) and others, if appropriate. Conduct that may constitute harassment is described in the Definitions section. Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual violence.

This procedure may be used by any student or employee of a state-operated campus of the University as well as third parties who are participating in a University-sponsored program or affiliated activity. Employee grievance procedures established through negotiated contracts, academic grievance review committees, student disciplinary grievance boards and any other procedures defined by contract will continue to operate as before. Furthermore, this procedure does not in any way deprive a complainant of the right to file with outside enforcement agencies, such as the New York State Division of Human Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office for Civil Rights of the United States Department of Education and the Office of Federal Contract Compliance of the United States Department of Labor. However, after filing with one of these outside enforcement agencies, or upon the initiation of litigation, the complaint will be referred to the campus affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator for investigation with the Office of General Counsel. Contact information for these agencies is listed in the Other Related Information section below. More detailed information may be obtained from the campus affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator.

This procedure provides a mechanism through which the University may identify, respond to and prevent incidents of illegal discrimination. The University recognizes and accepts its responsibility in this regard and believes that the establishment of this internal, non-adversarial grievance process will benefit student, faculty, staff and administration, permitting investigation and resolution of problems without resorting to the frequently expensive and time-consuming procedures of state and federal enforcement agencies or courts. Employees who observe or become aware of sex discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, should report this information to the campus Title IX coordinator.

All campuses must use this procedure unless the campus has made application for an exception. Requests for an exception, along with a copy of the requesting campus’ discrimination complaint procedure must be filed with the Office of General Counsel. The request for an exception will be acted upon by the Office of General Counsel after a review of the campus’ complaint procedure. The affirmative action officer and/or, in the case of sex discrimination, the Title IX coordinator, on each University campus shall receive any complaint of alleged discrimination, assist the complainant in the use of the complaint form, and provide the complainant with information about various internal and external mechanisms through which the complaint may be filed, including applicable time limits for filing with each agency. Campus distributed and published versions of this procedure must contain the name or title, office address, email address, and telephone number of the individual with whom to file a complaint.

The complainant is not required to pursue the University internal procedures before filing a complaint with a state or federal agency. In addition, if the complainant chooses to pursue the University internal procedure, the complainant is free to file a complaint with the appropriate state or federal agency at any point during the process.

During any portion of the procedures detailed hereafter, the parties shall not employ audio or videotaping devices.

Retaliation against a person who files a complaint, serves as a witness, or assists or participates in any manner in this procedure is strictly prohibited and may result in disciplinary action. Retaliation is an adverse action taken against an individual as a result of complaining about unlawful discrimination or harassment, exercising a legal right, and/or participating in a complaint investigation as a third-party witness. Participants who experience retaliation should contact the campus affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator. Complaints and investigations will be kept confidential to the extent possible.

Process

PART A: Informal Resolution

Complaints of sexual violence will not be resolved by using mediation, but instead must be referred immediately to the campus Title IX coordinator.

1. The affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator on an informal basis may receive initial inquiries, reports and requests for consultation and counseling. Assistance will be available whether or not a formal complaint is contemplated or even possible. It is the responsibility of the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator to respond to all such inquiries, reports and requests as promptly as possible and in a manner appropriate to the particular circumstances. This response may include interim measures to protect the parties during the investigation process. Interim measures will not disproportionately impact the complainant. Interim measures involving employees in collective bargaining units should be determined in consultation with campus employee relations.

Although in rare instances verbal complaints may be acted upon, the procedures set forth here rest upon the submission of a written complaint that will enable there to be a full and fair investigation of the facts.

It is the complainant’s responsibility to be certain that any complaint is filed within the 90-day period that is applicable under this paragraph.

2. Complaints or concerns that are reported to an administrator, manager or supervisor concerning an act of discrimination or harassment, or acts of discrimination or harassment that administrators, managers or supervisors observe or become aware of shall be immediately referred to the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator. Complaints also may be made directly to the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator by anyone who experiences, observes or becomes aware of discrimination or harassment.

Employees must file a written complaint with the affirmative action officer within 90 calendar days following the alleged discriminatory act or the date on which the complainant first knew or reasonably should have known of such act. All such complaints must be submitted on the forms provided by the University (see Forms below). The Charge of Discrimination form will be used for both the initiation of complaints under the informal procedure and the conversion of the complaint to the formal procedure. Students must file a complaint within 90 calendar days following the alleged discriminatory act or 90 calendar days after a final grade is received, for the semester during which the discriminatory acts occurred, if that date is later. Should a complaint of sexual violence or sexual harassment be filed later than 90 days following the alleged act, the complainant will still be offered all appropriate services and resources for victims of sexual violence and harassment, including interim measures to protect the parties. In addition, the matter may be referred for appropriate employee or student disciplinary action. As soon as reasonably possible after the date of filing of the complaint, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator will mail a notice of the complaint and a copy of the complaint to the respondent(s).

3. The complaint shall contain:

a. The name, local and permanent address(es), telephone number(s), and status (faculty, staff, student, third party) of the complainant.

b. A statement of facts explaining what happened and what the complainant believes constituted the unlawful discriminatory acts in sufficient detail to give each respondent reasonable notice of what is claimed against him/her. The statement should include the date, approximate time and place where the alleged acts of unlawful discrimination or harassment occurred. If the acts occurred on more than one date, the statement should also include the last date on which the acts occurred as well as detailed information about the prior acts. The names of any potential witnesses should be provided.

c. The name(s), address(es) and telephone number(s) of the respondent(s), i.e., the person(s) claimed to have committed the act(s) of unlawful discrimination.

d. Identification of the status of the persons charged whether faculty, staff or student.

e. A statement indicating whether or not the complainant has filed or reported information concerning the incidents referred to in the complaint with a non-campus official or agency, under any other complaint or complaint procedure. If an external complaint has been filed, the statement should indicate the name of the department or agency with which the information was filed and its address.

f. A description of any corrective or remedial action that the complainant would like to see taken.

g. Such other or supplemental information as may be requested.

h. Signature of complainant and the date complaint signed.

The affirmative action officer, or in instances involving sex discrimination, the Title IX coordinator, is available to assist in preparing the complaint. The Title IX coordinator will ensure that complainants are aware of their Title IX rights and available resources on and off campus, and the right, if any, to file a complaint with local law enforcement. Campuses will comply with law enforcement requests for cooperation and such cooperation may require the campus to temporarily suspend the fact-finding aspect of an investigation while the law enforcement agency is in the process of gathering evidence. The campus will resume its Title IX investigation as soon as it is notified by the law enforcement agency that it has completed the evidence gathering process.

4. In instances not involving sex discrimination, if the complainant brings a complaint beyond the period in which the complaint may be addressed under these procedures, the affirmative action officer may terminate any further processing of the complaint, refer the complaint to the Office of General Counsel or direct the complainant to an alternative forum.

5. If a complainant elects to have the matter dealt with in an informal manner, the affirmative action officer will attempt to reasonably resolve the problem to the mutual satisfaction of the parties.

6. In seeking an informal resolution, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator shall attempt to review all relevant information, interview pertinent witnesses and bring together the complainant and the respondent, if desirable. If a resolution satisfactory to both the complainant and the respondent is reached within 24 calendar days from the filing of the complaint, through the efforts of the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator, the officer shall close the case, sending a written notice to that effect to the complainant and respondent. The written notice, a copy of which shall be attached to the original complaint form in the officer’s file, shall contain the terms of any agreement reached by complainant and respondent, and shall be signed and dated by the complainant, the respondent and the affirmative action officer.

7. If the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator is unable to resolve the complaint to the mutual satisfaction of the complainant and respondent within 24 calendar days from the filing of the complaint, the officer shall so notify the complainant. The affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator shall again advise the complainant of his or her right to proceed to the next step internally and/or the right to separately file with appropriate external enforcement agencies. The time limitations set forth above in paragraphs 7 and 8, may be extended by mutual agreement of the complainant and respondent with the approval of the affirmative action officer. Such extension shall be confirmed in writing by the complainant and respondent.

8. At any time, subsequent to the filing of the Charge of Discrimination form, under Part A, the complainant may elect to proceed as specified in Part B of this document and forego the informal resolution procedure.

PART B: The Formal Complaint Procedure

1. The formal complaint proceeding is commenced by the filing of a complaint form as described in Part A (4). The 90-day time limit also applies to the filing of a formal complaint.

2. If the complainant first pursued the informal process and subsequently wishes to pursue a formal complaint, he/she may do so by checking the appropriate box, and signing and dating the complaint form.

3. The complaint, together with a statement, if applicable, from the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator indicating that informal resolution was not possible, shall be forwarded to the chairperson of the campus affirmative action committee within seven calendar days from the filing of the formal complaint.

4. If an informal resolution was not pursued, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator shall forward the complaint to the chairperson of the campus affirmative action committee within seven calendar days from the filing of the complaint.

5. Upon receipt of a complaint, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator will provide an initialed, signed, date-stamped copy of the complaint to the complainant. As soon as reasonably possible after the date of filing of the complaint, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator will mail a notice of complaint and a copy of the complaint to the respondent(s). Alternatively, such notice with a copy of the complaint may be given by personal delivery, provided such delivery is made by the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator (or designee) and, that proper proof of such delivery, including the date, time and place where such delivery occurred is entered in the records maintained by or for the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator.

6. Within seven calendar days of receipt of the complaint, the chairperson of the campus Affirmative Action Committee shall send notification to the complainant, the respondent and the campus president that a review of the matter shall take place by a tripartite panel to be selected by the complainant and the respondent from a pre-selected pool of eligible participants.

7. The tripartite panel shall consist of one member of the pre-selected pool chosen by the complainant, one member chosen by the respondent and a third chosen by the other two designees. The panel members shall choose a chair among themselves. Selection must be completed and written notification of designees submitted to the chairperson of the campus affirmative action committee no later than seven calendar days after the complainant, the respondent and the campus president received notice under paragraph six above.

If the president is the respondent, then the third member of the panel shall be selected by the chancellor or designee in system administration.

8. In the event that the procedural requirements governing the selection of the tripartite panel are not completed within seven calendar days after notification, the chairperson of the campus affirmative action committee shall complete the selection process.

9. The tripartite panel shall review all relevant information, interview pertinent witnesses and, at their discretion, hear testimony from and bring together the complainant and the respondent, if desirable. Both the complainant and the respondent(s) shall be entitled to submit written statements or other relevant and material evidence and to provide rebuttal to the written record compiled by the tripartite panel. Complainant has the right to request alternative arrangements if the complainant does not want to be in the same room as the accused. These alternative arrangements must be consistent with the rights of the accused and must enable both parties and the panel to hear each other during any hearing.

10. Within 15 calendar days from the completion of selection of the panel, the chairperson of the tripartite panel shall submit a summary of its findings and the panel’s recommendation(s) for further action, on a form to be provided by the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator, to the president. The burden of proof in cases of sex discrimination is preponderance of the evidence. If the president is the respondent, the findings and recommendation shall be submitted to the chancellor or his designee. When the panel transmits the summary of its findings and the panel's recommendations to the president, the panel will also send, concurrently, copies of both the summary of its findings and recommendation(s) to the complainant, respondent and the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator.

11. Within 10 calendar days of receipt of the written summary, the president or designee shall issue a written statement to the complainant and respondent, indicating what action the president proposes to take. The action proposed by the president or designee, may consist of:

a. A determination that the complaint was not substantiated.

b. A determination that the complaint was substantiated.

i. For employees (including student employees) not in a collective bargaining unit: The president may take such administrative action as he/she deems appropriate under his/her authority as the chief administrative officer of the college, including but not limited to termination, demotion, reassignment, suspension, reprimand or training.

ii. For students: The president may determine that sufficient information exists to refer the matter to the student judiciary or other appropriate disciplinary panel for review and appropriate action under the appropriate student conduct code.

iii. For employees in collective bargaining units: The president may determine that sufficient information exists to refer the matter to his/her designee for investigation and disciplinary action or other action as may be appropriate under the applicable collective bargaining agreement.

The action of the president shall be final.

If the president is the respondent, the chancellor or his designee shall issue a written statement, indicating what action the chancellor proposes to take. The chancellor’s decision shall be final for purposes of this discrimination procedure.

12. No later than seven calendar days following issuance of the statement by the president or the chancellor, as the case may be, the affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator officer shall issue a letter to the complainant and to the respondent(s) advising them that the matter, for purposes of this discrimination procedure, is closed.

The time limitations set forth above in paragraphs 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, and 12, may be extended by mutual agreement of the complainant and respondent with the approval of the panel. Such extension shall be confirmed in writing.

13. If the complainant is dissatisfied with the president’s or chancellor’s decision, the complainant may elect to file a complaint with one or more state and federal agencies. The campus affirmative action officer/Title IX coordinator will provide general information on state and federal guidelines and laws, as well as names and addresses of various enforcement agencies.

Definitions

Harassment on the Basis of Protected Characteristic(s) other than Sex/Gender – harassment based on race, color, age, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation or other protected characteristics is oral, written, graphic or physical conduct relating to an individual's protected characteristics that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to interfere with or limit the ability of an individual to participate in or benefit from the educational institution’s programs or activities.

Sex Discrimination – behaviors and actions that deny or limit a person’s ability to benefit from, and/or fully participate in the educational programs or activities or employment opportunities because of a person’s sex. This includes but is not limited to sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual violence by employees, students, or third parties. Employees should report sexual harassment that they observe or become aware of to the Title IX coordinator.

Sexual assault is defined as a physical sexual act or acts committed against a person’s will and consent or when a person is incapable of giving active consent, incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct, or incapable of declining participation in, or communicating unwillingness to engage in, a sexual act or acts. Sexual assault is an extreme form of sexual harassment.* Sexual assault includes what is commonly known as “rape,” whether forcible or non-forcible, “date rape” and “acquaintance rape.” Nothing contained in this definition shall be construed to limit or, conflict with the sex offenses 'enumerated in Article 130 of the New York State Penal Law, which shall be the guiding reference in determining if alleged conduct is consistent with the definition of sexual assault.

Sexual Harassment in the Educational Setting – unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment can include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment of a student denies or limits, on the basis of sex, the student’s ability to participate in or to receive benefits, services, or opportunities in the educational institution’s program.

Sexual Harassment in the Employment Setting – unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when any of the following occurs: • Submission to such conduct is made a term or condition of an individual’s continued employment, promotion, or other condition of employment.

  • • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for employment decisions affecting an employee or job applicant.
  • • Such conduct is intended to interfere, or results in interference, with an employee’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

Sexual Violence - physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent.

Preponderance of the Evidence – the standard of proof in sexual harassment and sexual assault cases, which asks whether it is “more likely than not” that the sexual harassment or sexual violence occurred. If the evidence presented meets this standard, then the accused should be found responsible.

D. SUNY Confidentiality Statement

The College will protect the privacy of all parties to a complaint or other report of sexual harassment and sexual violence to the extent possible. When the college receives complaints of sexual harassment or sexual violence, the college has an obligation to respond in a way that limits the effects of the sexual harassment and sexual violence and prevents its recurrence. Information will be shared as necessary in the course of an investigation with people who need to know, such as investigators, witnesses, and the accused. If you are unsure of someone’s duties and ability to maintain your privacy, ask them before you talk to them. Certain staff are obligated by law to maintain confidentiality, including the counseling center and the local rape crisis center off-campus.

Contact information for confidential resources on and off-campus may be accessed at the President's Office website.

495.04 SEXUAL ORIENTATION HARASSMENT POLICY

The College's sexual orientation harassment policy is described in detail in 870.01 of this document.

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