Department Information

Chair:
Randi Storch, Department Chair
Old Main, Room 212-B
Phone: 607-753-2723
Fax: 607-753-5598
Email:
Randi.storch@cortland.edu
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Webography



Civil Rights

After Slavery

http://www.afterslavery.com/
 

This site explores the history of labor, race, and citizenship for African-Americans after emancipation. It provides primary sources, as well as an online classroom complete with lesson plans. Historians from the United States, Ireland, and the United Kingdom prepared the site. The project is directed from Queen's University Belfast and funded by the (UK) Arts and Humanities Research Council. 



Facing History and Ourselves

http://facinghistory.org/
 

Facing History and Ourselves delivers classroom strategies, resources, and lessons that inspire young people to take responsibility for their world. In particular, this organization combats bigotry and brings the history of racism, civil rights abuses, and inequality to the classroom. Internationally it is recognized for its quality and effectiveness. Facing History harnesses the power of the internet and partners with school systems, universities, and ministries of education worldwide.



Pacific Northwest Labor and Civil Rights Projects

http://depts.washington.edu/labhist/
 

The University of Washington has collected several online exhibits the provide narratives and documents from the labor and civil rights movements in Washington State and the larger Northwest. Included are projects on the Black Panthers, Farm Labor, Chicano activists, and the Seattle General Strike.



People with a History: An Online Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans* History

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/pwh/index.html
 

This site is part of the Fordham University Sourcebook series. In addition to primary sources, it provides guides to teaching the history of the LGBT community.



The American Experience: Reconstruction, The Second Civil War

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/reconstruction/
 

This PBS site is a good source for the Reconstruction time period. It has many primary source documents, pictures, and timelines. This site also contains a teacher's guide with lesson plans, and activities.



The History of Jim Crow (PBS)

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/
 

This is a very helpful website for materials and/or information about the Civil Rights Movement for African-Americans. The site is full of links to lesson plans, timelines, images, essays, primary sources, etc. and is very easy to navigate. This site is strongly recommended to teachers who are looking for plans or ideas or who just want to learn some more information. The site's interactive timeline is a useful guide that will help students learn the important names, dates, and events that occur throughout the course of the movement. The primary documents could inspire creative lesson plans and activities.



Women in World History

http://chnm.gmu.edu/wwh/
 

This website is provided through George Mason University and is free to those who access it. The site provides primary sources along with reviews of the primary sources. The site also provides fourteen different learning modules on topics pertaining to women throughout world history. These modules include ideas for lessons and strategies for teaching the materials presented within the modules. There is also a section that gives sample DBQ essays and their guidelines which are printable. For more websites that might provide information on women's rights, please see the Women in World History category.