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CPN Student Handbook

   Composition Handbook
A Guide for Students

Prepared by
Mary Lynch Kennedy
Original Design by
Joyce Hansen



 

Directory
  Sequence of Required Writing Courses  
  Introducing Cortland’s Composition Program  
     
Part I: Course Descriptions and Outcomes  
  CPN 100 Writing Studies I and CPN 102 Writing Studies in the Community I  
  CPN 101 Writing Studies II and CPN 103 Writing Studies in the Community II  
     
Part II: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  
  Course Titles and Content  
  Teacher Expectations and Student Achievement  
  GE 10 Requirement  
  Course Prerequisites  
 

Withdrawal from a Course

 
  Grades in Composition Courses  
  Course Requirements  
  Computer Component and CLIP  
  Classroom Policies: Attendance, Punctuality, and Conduct  
  Academic Integrity  
  Tutoring and Resources for Writing  
  Academic Grievances  
     
Part III: Sample Student Essays  
  Are Cell Phones Messing with Our Heads?  
  Cell Phones  
  Cyberspace: A Growing World  
  Steroids  

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Cortland’s Sequence of Required Writing:

At SUNY Cortland, students are required to take two composition courses and two writing-intensive courses. The composition courses are taken in sequence. For the first course, you may select CPN 100 Writing Studies I (3 credits) or CPN 102 Writing Studies in the Community I (4 credits). For the second course, you may choose between CPN 101 Writing Studies II (3 credits) and CPN 103 Writing Studies in the Community II (4 credits). CPN 102 and CPN 103 are service learning courses. In these courses, students perform thirty hours of service learning work in the community.


You are also required to take six credits of Writing-Intensive Courses. You must take at least one Writing-Intensive Course in your major. The other course can be in or out of the major. Writing courses from other institutions cannot be used to satisfy the Writing-Intensive Course Requirement.

Conference Room

 


 

Course Requirements

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Introducing Cortland’s Composition Program

Dear Students:

This handbook contains information you need to know about the two required composition courses at SUNY Cortland. It describes the courses, presents their goals and objectives, explains policies and procedures, and provides sample student essays.

The two composition courses fulfill the writing portion of the General Education Category 10: Basic Communication. Most students take both courses at Cortland, but some fulfill part or all of the six-credit requirement prior to entering the College. If you received a score of 3,4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition, you will receive credit for both CPN 100 and CPN 101. See the SUNY College at Cortland Catalog for additional information.


If you transferred in a one-semester composition course equivalent to CPN 100 or CPN 102, you will receive three credit hours, and you may enroll in CPN 101 or CPN 103. If you transferred in a two-semester composition course sequence equivalent to CPN 100/102 and CPN 101/103, you have fulfilled the requirement. Students who transfer credit hours equivalent to the CPN 101 or 103 level are not required to take CPN 100 or 102. Transfer students are strongly urged to complete the composition requirement during their first year at Cortland.

The handbook is divided into three sections. In Part I you will find descriptions and student learning outcomes for CPN 100, CPN 102, CPN 101, and CPN 103. Part II tries to anticipate and answer students’ frequently asked questions (FAQs). Part III contains samples of essays written in the CPN courses.
I wish you success in accomplishing your writing goals.

Mary Lynch Kennedy
Distinguished Teaching Professor
Director of Composition & Campus Writing Coordinator

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Part I:
Course Descriptions and Outcomes


Course Descriptions and Outcomes

Our primary mission is to help you acquire the knowledge of writing and the writing skills you will need in college, the workplace, and the community. Your writing instructor will help you to develop competency in five areas: (1) rhetorical knowledge, (2) critical thinking, reading, and writing, (3) process, (4) conventions, and (5) technology.

You will learn academic writing--reading academic prose and making arguments in a variety of genres. In addition, as the course titles, “Writing Studies I” and “Writing Studies II,” suggest, you will also learn about writing and how writing works. The composition courses will lead you to new understandings of what you are doing when you write and how to achieve what you want from your writing.

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CPN 100 Writing Studies I and 
CPN 102 Writing Studies in the Community I

The first course in the composition sequence will give you introductory rhetorical skills in the study of how genres and rhetorical situations shape writing practices.

CPN 100 Writing Studies I 

(A) Introduction to the study and practice of writing with an emphasis on critical reading and thinking skills. Not open to students with credit for CPN 102. Fulfills:

GE10; LASR (4 cr. hrs.)

CPN 102 Writing Studies in the
Community I 

(A) Introduction to the study and practice of writing with an emphasis on critical reading and thinking skills. Includes 30 hours of service learning work in the community.

Not open to students with credit for CPN 100.

Fulfills: GE10, LASR
(4 cr. hrs.) 

For information about service-learning courses, click here. 

 

 

Outcomes for CPN 100 and CPN 102

Rhetorical knowledge
You will

  • Focus on a purpose
  • Respond to the needs of different audiences
  • Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations
  • Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation
  • Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality
  • Understand how genres shape reading and writing
  • Write in several genres
  • Produce coherent texts within common college level written formats (GE-10)

 

Process
You will

  • Investigate your own writing practices and processes
  • Understand how genres and rhetorical situations inform writing processes
  • Be aware that it usually takes multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve your written texts (GE-10)
  • Develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proof-reading
  • Understand writing as an open process that permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work
  • Understand the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes
  • Learn to critique your own and others’ works
  • Learn to balance the advantages of relying on others with the responsibility of doing your part
  • Use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences

 

 

 

Critical thinking, reading, and writing
You will

  • Investigate genre- and theme-appropriate research and writing practices
  • Learn to find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • Incorporate your own ideas with those of others
  • Study the cultural and social roles of genres
  • Study how cultural, social, technological, and material contexts shape and are shaped by writing practices
  • Demonstrate the ability to research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details (GE-10)

 

 

Conventions
You will

  • Learn common formats for genres
  • Learn appropriate documentation styles
  • Develop knowledge of genre conventions
  • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

Service-Learning Outcomes for CPN 103
Students will apply course lessons to real-life situations from community engagement activities and draw on community engagement activities to help expand on class lessons.

 

 

 

 

Technology
You will

  • Learn appropriate use of databases and other information resources
  • Produce multimodal compositions
  • Study the use of networked environments and genres

 

 

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 The second course in the composition
sequence gives you the opportunity to refine your writing skills in a course that stresses theme-based critical inquiry and research into topics and issues of public
import. By exploring the theme from
different angles, you will deepen your
understanding of the readings and attain a firm grasp of complex topics and 
arguments.

CPN 101 Writing Studies II 

(A) Theme-based critical inquiry and research into topics and issues of public import. Not open to students with credit for CPN 103.

Prerequisite: A grade of C-or better in CPN 100 or CPN 102.

Fulfills:GE10; LASR (3 cr. hrs.)

CPN 103 Writing Studies in the
Community II 

(A) Theme-based critical inquiry and research into topics and issues of public import. Includes 30 hours of service learning work in the community. Not open to students with credit for CPN 101.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in

CPN 100 or CPN 102. Fulfills: GE10;

LASR (4 cr. hrs.)

For information about service-learning
courses, click here.  

CPN 101 Writing Studies II and CPN 103 Writing Studies in the Community II

 

 

 

 


 

 

Outcomes for CPN 101 and CPN 103

Rhetorical knowledge

You will

  • Study and use genres to write about course theme
  • Respond to different audiences and rhetorical situations
  • Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality
  • Use conventions and format appropriate genres
  • Write in several genres
  • Produce coherent texts within common college-level written formats (GE-10)

Critical thinking, reading, and writing

You will

  • Investigate genre- and theme-appropriate research and writing practices
  • Learn to find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • Incorporate your own ideas with those of others
  • Study the cultural and social roles of genres
  • Study how cultural, social, technological, and material contexts shape and are shaped by writing practices
  • Demonstrate the ability to research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details (GE-10)

Technology

You will

  • Learn appropriate use of databases and other information resources
  • Produce multimodal compositions
  • Study the use of networked environments and genres
 

Processes

You will

  • Study writing processes at work in specific genres
  • Investigate the relationship between your own writing practices and those of professionals
  • Understand the collaborative and social aspects of composition
  • Use technologies to produce genres for a variety of audiences
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve your written texts (GE-10)

Conventions

You will

  • Learn common formats for genres
  • Learn appropriate documentation styles
  • Develop knowledge of genre conventions
  • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

Service-Learning Outcomes for CPN 103

Students will apply course lessons to real-life situations from community engagement activities and draw on community engagement activities to help expand on class lessons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Part II:
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQS)


 

Facility

Part II provides answers to FAQs about

  • Course Titles and Content
  • Teacher Expectations and Student Achievement
  • GE 10 Requirement
  • Course Prerequisites
  • Withdrawal from a Course
  • Grades in Composition Courses
  • Course Requirements
  • Computer Component and CLIP
  • Classroom Policies: Attendance, Punctuality, and Conduct
  • Academic Integrity
  • Tutoring and Resources for Writing
  • Academic Grievances

Course Titles and Content

 Why are the composition courses called “Writing Studies I” and “Writing Studies II”?
One of our main goals is to lead students to new understandings of what they are doing when they write and how to achieve what they want from their writing. Your instructor will accomplish this goal by covering topics such as the roles writing plays in producing and maintaining social systems and relations; writing across the life span; writing in academia, professions, workplace, and public sphere; historical and comparative studies of writing; and examination of how technology is shaping writing.

Are there reading assignments in the CPN courses?
In college, reading and writing go hand in hand. You will be asked to think critically about what you read, engage the ideas and issues, and integrate them into your writing. At times your instructor will supply the reading sources, and at other times you will conduct research and obtain the readings yourself.

What types of writing will I be required to do?
You will write in multiple genres ranging from informal blogs to formal argumentative research essays. You will use available electronic environments to write multiple drafts of major essays and critique your own and your classmates’ work. You will also use technology to write multimodal compositions.

Teacher Expectations and Student Achievement

 What are the course expectations for reading and writing?
Your instructor expects you to complete all the reading assignments in a timely fashion. Strive to be an active, critical reader who annotates and marks the text, takes notes, and poses and answers questions. Some of the writing assignments you receive will be detailed and directive; others may be loosely structured and open-ended. In either case, as you draft and revise your paper your instructor will expect you to apply the writing strategies and conventions you have learned in the course. At the editing stage you will be expected to identify and correct your own spelling, grammatical, and mechanical errors.

Where can I find examples of essays written by students in the composition courses?
Sample student work appears in two places:

  • online at the site of the Writing Resource Center
  • in Part III of this handbook

Visit the Writing Resource Center. On the navigation bar, click on Writing Course Requirements. Scroll down to CPN 100

Sample Essays and CPN 101 & 103 Sample Essays. You will find a number of strong essays written by students in the CPN courses. In Part III of this handbook, you will find four student essays. “Are Cell Phones Messing with Our Heads?” is an article student Thomas Toteno wrote for a class anthology in CPN 101. It is a good example of an essay that integrates images and text. The next three essays represent three levels of achievement. The first essay, “Cell Phones,” clearly meets the standards for college-level writing. The second essay, “Cyberspace: A Growing World,” approaches the standards but has not yet met them. The third essay, “Steroids,” fails to meet college-level standards for writing. If you would like to know more about the standards that were used to judge these three essays, talk to your instructor.

GE 10 Requirement

When I complete the two CPN courses, will I have fulfilled General Education Category 10: Basic Communication?
You will have fulfilled the writing portion of GE 10. You must still complete presentation skills requirement. Click here for a list of approved Presentation Skills (PS) courses.

Course Prerequisites

What is the prerequisite for enrolling in CPN 101 or CPN 103?
Successful completion of CPN 100 or CPN 102, that is, a passing grade of C- or better, is the prerequisite.

Is CPN 101 or CPN 103 a prerequisite for upper-level English courses?
Yes, successful completion of CPN 101 or CPN 103 is a prerequisite for any English course above the 200-level.

Withdrawal from a Course

 How do I withdraw from my CPN course?
Click here for the “Withdrawal From Course” form. Appropriate signatures must be obtained from the Associate Dean of your school before submitting this form for approval. Please note that the deadline for withdrawing is November 15 in the fall and April 15 in the spring.

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Grades in Composition Courses

What is the passing grade for composition courses?
Students must pass the courses with grades of C- or better. 

What if I earn a D grade?
D grades are passing grades and will count in your overall credit hours; however, D grades in CPN do not satisfy the College’s bachelor’s degree requirements. If you receive a grade lower than C-, you must retake the CPN course.

If I receive a D grade, may I retake the composition course at another college?
No. Courses in which students receive D grades must be retaken at SUNY Cortland

If I fail CPN 102 or CPN 103, may I register for CPN 100 or CPN 101?
No. Students receiving grades below C- in composition courses must retake the course in which they received the grade. In other words, students in CPN 100 must retake CPN 100; students in CPN 102 must retake CPN 102; students in CPN 101must retake CPN 101; students in CPN 103 must retake CPN 103.

If I receive a grade of Incomplete in CPN 100 or CPN 102, may I register for CPN 101 or CPN 103?
You may register for the second CPN course, but if you have not completed the requirements for clearing an Incomplete in CPN 100 or CPN 102 by the first day of the CPN 101 or CPN 103 class for which you have registered, you will not be allowed to remain in that class.

Why do I have to sign a grading policy form in my CPN classes?
Students are sometimes perplexed by the grading policy for composition courses. In order to avoid confusion, we require all students enrolled in composition courses to sign the CPN Grading Signature Form.

Course Requirements 

How much writing will I do in Writing Studies I and Writing Studies II?
In each of the composition courses, you will write at least three mutiple-draft essays and one in-class essay. In addition, you will write shorter pieces such as responses to readings, blog or journal entries, and brief informal papers.

Why am I required to write an in-class essay?
The purpose of the in-class essay is to prepare you for in-class examinations. A certain amount of instruction and preparation will precede the in-class writing. You will do preparatory work (for example, analyzing reading sources, prewriting, outlining,etc.) ahead of time, but the actual drafting of the essay will occur during a class period.

Will I have the opportunity to revise the essays I write in CPN?
Your composition instructor will teach you how to plan, draft, revise, and edit the major essays you write in the course. Your teacher will not be the only one providing feedback on your drafts. You will also participate in peer review sessions.

How will my instructor respond to my essays?
In addition to writing comments on your papers, your instructor will use an analytical rating scale, such as a rubric. Your instructor will also meet with you twice each semester to go over drafts of your papers.

Will I use MLA or APA documentation?
Your instructor will teach you how to use both forms of citation and documentation.

What types of texts will I be assigned to read?
In addition to the online Cortland Composition Handbook, your instructor will require a collection of nonfiction readings and one of the handbooks on the following list:

  • Troyka, Lynn Quitman, and Douglas Hesse. Simon & Schuster Handbook for Writers
  • Rosen, Leonard J., and Laurence Behrens. Allyn & Bacon Handbook
  • Raimes, Anne, and Maria Jerskey. Universal Keys for Writers
  • Hairston, Maxine, Ruszkiewicz John J., and Christy Friend. Scott Foresman Handbook for Writers
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Computer Component and CLIP

What is the computer component?

All the composition courses are scheduled to meet for a minimum of two weeks in a computer lab. Your instructor will decide how to use this time. You might  engage in database searching, study and practice networked writing (e.g., writing for the Web, email, blogs, etc.), or write multimodal compositions (compositions that include a variety of media).

What is CLIP?

CLIP is the Composition Library Instruction Program. Students in CPN 101 and CPN 103 are required to participate in the CLIP and attain a passing grade on the CLIP quiz. If you miss your class’s CLIP session, you must attend a make-up session. A schedule of the
CLIP sessions is available on the library's Web site. If you are unable to attend one of the make-up sessions, you must notify the Coordinator of Instruction, Sara Quimby, sara.quimby@cortland.edu, before the last session is conducted.

 

Classroom Policies:
Attendance, Punctuality, and Conduct

What is the attendance policy for CPN courses?
Your instructor will set an attendance policy that complies with and is no stricter than the College Attendance Policy. The College policy is explained in
Section 410.12 of the College Handbook.

What if I have to miss class for a school-sponsored event or
activity?

Approved College activities are considered to be valid absences so long as students meet the obligations spelled out in the College Handbook. See 410.12 C. Class Attendance Policy for Approved Absences for College
Activities.

If I have to miss class, should I inform my instructor ahead of
time?

Absolutely. The College Handbook states, “If students anticipate having to miss class, it is their responsibility to inform the instructor ahead of time” (Section 410.12A).

 

Am I responsible for the work I miss when I am absent?
Yes. The College Handbook states, “Students are responsible for all work missed. Instructors shall establish procedures to allow students who have been absent for valid reasons to make up missed class work” (Section 410.12A).

Does the College have a policy for punctuality?

Your instructor will establish a policy for punctuality. Class punctuality is very important. If you must come late to class, inform your instructor beforehand. Punctuality also means meeting deadlines for assignments. Plan ahead because late work may be penalized severely.

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Who establishes the rules for classroom conduct?
Your instructor will establish rules for classroom etiquette. Be considerate and do not do anything that will distract or annoy your colleagues. As a common courtesy, turn off cell phones and other technological devices prior to class.

Academic Integrity

What is academic integrity?
Academic integrity can be defined, in one word, as honesty. The principle of academic integrity stretches beyond the limits of a classroom. Good students are honest with themselves, their professors, their roommates, and their community. As a student at SUNY Cortland, you are expected to uphold the values of academic integrity at all times.


What is the College policy regarding Academic Integrity?


What are some examples of academic dishonesty?

The following list is not exhaustive. Its purpose is to give you an idea of actions that violate the code of academic integrity:

  • Cheating on an in-class or take-home exam, either by using crib sheets or collaborating with other students
  • Taking an exam for another student or having another student take an exam for you
  • Misusing campus resources, for example, damaging library materials by tearing out pages from a book, magazine, or journal
  • Stealing books and resources from the library * Handing in a paper written wholly or partially by another student
  • Incorporating another person’s ideas in your work, either in the form of a direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary, without acknowledging the source of the material
  • Purchasing a paper from an online service or other source and submitting it, either partially or in its entirety, as your own

 

 

Some other, less obvious, forms of academic dishonesty are:

  • Helping another student violate the code of academic integrity
  • Having someone else write portions of your paper without acknowledging the other person’s help
  • Cutting and pasting electronic text into your paper and submitting it as your own work without acknowledging the source of the material. Examples of electronic text are material taken from Web pages, email messages, blogs, chatroom conversations, discussion lists, and so forth.
  • Creating false sources to avoid doing proper scholarly research
  • Handing in the same paper for more than one course without the specific permission of both instructors. If you have written a paper for one course and wish to turn it in for credit in another course, you must have the permission of both instructors. Many students do not realize that using the same paper for two or more courses is a violation of the conduct code. Students who attempt to avoid completing all the requirements of a given course by using work they have already completed are compromising their integrity.

What is plagiarism?

Plagiarizing is stealing. Rather than stealing material goods, a person guilty of plagiarism steals intellectual property, a thought, idea, or written segment belonging to somebody else. Some students misinterpret plagiarism as simply the act of copying so many words in a row without citing the author. You must think more broadly. Plagiarism is more than stealing a written line.

You can also plagiarize by borrowing or expanding on someone else’s idea without citing the author. Here are some examples:

  • Failing to attribute a concept or an idea to its originator is a form of plagiarism. Even if you are paraphrasing or rewriting an idea that you heard or read somewhere, you are still using someone else’s concepts. If you don’t attribute the idea to its originator, you are claiming it as your own. This is an act of plagiarism. Citing sources is very important when you are dealing with Web-based texts, even though many Web resources do not display the name of the author or authors. In this case, you are required to give other pertinent information regarding the Web source, such as the title of the work and its Web address. Further information on citing Web sources can be found in your style manual.
  • Failing to put quotation marks around material that you are copying verbatim is a form of plagiarism. There is very little flexibility when it comes to quotations. Words that are copied verbatim from a source must be put in quotation marks and properly attributed.
  • Citing/Attributing sources incorrectly can be a form of plagiarism. The most important reason for citing sources is to inform your readers about where you obtained your information. Citations enable readers to access further information if they are particularly interested in your topic. If you cite incorrectly, you lead the readers astray, and as a result they will question your accuracy.

  • Turning in a paper that was written by another individual is plagiarism. This includes turning in a paper written by a former or current student, a paper posted on the Web, or a paper purchased from any source, including online papermills. Have you considered buying a term paper online? You may be tempted to think that is a foolproof way to avoid writing your own paper without getting caught. Think again. The same high-tech environment that allows you to purchase papers online allows university faculty to protect their classrooms from plagiarism. Professors have access to a vast array of software that enables them to enter as little as one line from a student’s research paper and determine if it was bought or copied from an online source. This detection software searches the very same databases the student searches when purchasing a paper.

How can I avoid plagiarism?

Staying educated about the specifics of plagiarism is your best defense against it. Use the following tips and guidelines to protect yourself from illegally using sources.

Always refer to your style manual, for example, the MLA Handbook, the APA Publication Manual, or the Chicago Manual of Style. When you have finished writing your paper, go back and double check all your quotations and citations to ensure that you have incorporated them as indicated.

If you are confused about whether or not to cite a source or about the proper way to do so, do not hesitate to ask for help. SUNY Cortland has established the Academic Support and Achievement Program (ASAP) to aid students who need such help. Tutors are available at 607-753-4309. You can also contact your professor. Your professor would much rather assist you with your writing process than watch you make a mistake that could hurt your academic career.

Take good notes while researching. You may find it helpful to paraphrase information in your notes while you read. Then, when you are writing your paper, use the paraphrased information to come up with the final text. You still must provide a citation for the idea; however, the wording will be all your own.

What other resources are available to me?
For detailed information about academic honesty, check out the Writing Resource Center.

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Tutoring and Resources for Writing

Where can I go for help with my writing?
The Academic Support and Achievement Program (ASAP) offers professional assistance to help students improve their writing skills. Tutoring is available in prewriting, organizing, revising, editing and proofreading for many types of writing, including essays, syntheses, research papers, speeches, critical analyses, summaries and critiques. Stop by the ASAP office at Van Hoesen, Room B-205, or call 753-4309 for an appointment.

Is online tutoring available?
ASAP provides online tutoring for writing in all classes below the 400 level. The service is called NightOWL.

Where can I find online resources for writing?
Visit the Writing Resource Center. On this Website, you’ll find information about the composition courses and a number of sample essays written by Cortland students in CPN 100 and CPN 101. You’ll also learn how to submit work to the College’s annual writing contest. The site provides a detailed explanation of academic honesty and advice on avoiding plagiarism. It also provides links to handbooks for writers, documentation guides, reference books, online writing labs, and resources for writing in every department in the College.?

Academic Grievances

What do I do if I have an Academic Grievance?
The following information is taken from the College Handbook:

A. The Department Level

1. In the case of grievance a student has with an instructor, the student should attempt an informal settlement with the instructor. There may be instances when the student feels s/he needs to involve his or her advisor or department chair in a specific case.

2. If no mutually satisfactory informal settlement can be reached with the instructor, then the student may file a written statement of his or her grievance with the chair of the department which the grievance occurred. The chair shall hold an informal meeting with the student and the instructor, and make a decision within one week after the meeting.

3. If either party is dissatisfied with the decision made by the department chair, it is the responsibility of the department chair to inform both parties of the next possible recourse, namely to appeal the decision to the dean of the school in which the department is located. Intent to appeal is to be filed, in writing, in the office of the school dean within 10 days after receipt of the department chair’s decision.

4. If the grievance is initially with a department chair, then the student is to attempt an informal settlement with the chair. If no mutually satisfactory decision can be reached, then the grievance is to be filed with the school dean as outlined above.

For additional information, see Chapter 350 of the College Handbook.

 

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Part III:
Sample Student Essays


 

In Part III of this handbook, you will find four student essays. “Are Cell Phones Messing with Our Heads?” is an article student Thomas Toteno wrote for a class anthology in CPN 101. It is a good example of an essay that integrates images and text. The next three essays represent three levels of achievement. The first essay, “Cell Phones,” clearly meets the standards for college-level writing. The second essay, “Cyberspace: A Growing World,” approaches the standards but has not yet met them. The third essay, “Steroids,” fails to meet college-level standards for writing. If you would like to know more about the standards that were used to judge these three essays, talk to your instructor.

INSTRUCTIONS: CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINKS FOR FULL STUDENT ESSAYS. SCROLL OVER GRAPHIC AND CLICK ONCE TO ZOOM IN FOR A READABLE VIEW. 

ARE CELL PHONES MESSING WITH OUR HEADS?
by Thomas Toteno

ESSAY MEETING THE STANDARDS
by Anonymous

ESSAY APPROACHING THE STANDARDS: CYBERSPACE: A GROWING WORLD
by Anonymous

ESSAY FAILING TO MEET THE STANDARDS:STEROIDS
by Anonymous

 

 


The SUNY Cortland Academic Integrity Policy, including procedures for disciplinary action, is outlined in Chapter 340 of official SUNY Cortland College Handbook.
 

 


Please Follow The Directions Below To Download:

The following link provides access to the CPN Student Handbook with its original format intact. In order to make this document easy to navigate, two measures have been taken.

 

1. The table of contents is fully linked to the appropriate places in the document. Simply click on the section of the table of contents you wish to see and you will be brought directly there.

2. A bookmark function has been implemented into the document. Open the PDF file and click on the "bookmark" button on the left hand side of the PDF viewer. Each section of the handbook has been clearly sectioned. Click on the bookmark you wish to see and the appropriate page will appear.

CPN Student Handbook