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CPN Faculty Handbook

 

Handbook

 

 

Welcome


 

 

Interactive Table of Contents

 

 Part I: The Composition Program             

Part II: Personnel Policies and Procedures           

Part III: Available Resources       

APPENDICES     Click Here for all Appendices (PDF Format)

  • APPENDIX A: GENRE THEORY     
  • APPENDIX B: GUIDELINES FOR ANALYZING GENRES        
  • APPENDIX C: SAMPLE STUDENT ESSAY  
  • APPENDIX D: SUNY WRITING-DISCIPLINE RUBRICS          
  • APPENDIX E: ANCHOR ESSAYS AND ESSAY ANALYSIS      
  • APPENDIX F: CPN GRADING POLICY SIGNATURE FORM  - Print Version
  • APPENDIX G: SAMPLE SYLLABI FOR CPN 100 AND CPN 101
  • APPENDIX H: CPN COURSE TEACHER EVALUATION FORM            
  • APPENDIX I: COURSE TEACHER EVALUATION FORM 

 

 

Part 1

SUNY Cortland

Words are things; and a small drop of ink,
Falling like dew upon a thought, produces
That which makes thousands, perhaps millions think.
– Lord Byron


What you need to know about our program and courses


 

Mission
Our primary mission is to help students acquire the knowledge of writing and the writing skills they will need in college, the workplace, and the community.

Core Values
We have five core values:

  1. Mutual respect and human dignity, including a just wage and improved working conditions to support all faculty in their mission for teaching writing
  2. Competency in writing, including rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking, reading and writing processes, and knowledge of conventions
  3. Commitment to high quality, informed teaching
  4. Accuracy, fairness, and honesty
  5. Celebration of student writing

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We have adopted the Outcomes Statement of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA) as a basis for our overall program goals.

 

The Council of Writing Program Administrators is a national association of college and university faculty with professional responsibilities for directing writing programs. Members include directors of freshman composition, undergraduate writing, writing across the curriculum programs, writing in the disciplines programs, and writing centers, as well as department chairs, division heads, deans, and so on. The WPA Council Outcomes Statement outlines fundamental, widely held goals for first-year composition programs in the areas of rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking, reading and writing processes, and knowledge of conventions. The statement appears on the next page.

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WPA Outcomes Statement for FirstYear Composition

Introduction

This statement describes the common knowledge, skills, and attitudes sought by first-year composition programs in American postsecondary education. To some extent, we seek to regularize what can be expected to be taught in first-year composition; to this end the document is not merely a compilation or summary of what currently takes place. Rather, the following statement articulates what composition teachers nationwide have learned from practice, research, and theory. This document intentionally defines only "outcomes," or types of results, and not "standards," or precise levels of achievement. The setting of standards should be left to specific institutions or specific groups of institutions.

Learning to write is a complex process, both individual and social, that takes place over time with continued practice and informed guidance. Therefore, it is important that teachers, administrators, and a concerned public do not imagine that these outcomes can be taught in reduced or simple ways. Helping students demonstrate these outcomes requires expert understanding of how students actually learn to write. For this reason we expect the primary audience for this document to be well-prepared college writing teachers and college writing program administrators. In some places, we have chosen to write in their professional language. Among such readers, terms such as "rhetorical" and "genre" convey a rich meaning that is not easily simplified. While we have also aimed at writing a document that the general public can understand, in limited cases we have aimed first at communicating effectively with expert writing teachers and writing program administrators.

These statements describe only what we expect to find at the end of first-year composition, at most schools a required general education
course or sequence of courses. As writers move beyond first-year composition, their writing abilities do not merely improve. Rather, students' abilities not only diversify along disciplinary and professional lines but also move into whole new levels where expected outcomes expand, multiply, and diverge. For this reason, each statement of outcomes for first-year composition is followed by suggestions for further work that builds on these outcomes.

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  • Focus on a purpose

  • Respond to the needs of different audiences

  • Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations

  • Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the   rhetorical situation

  • Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level

 

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  • The main features of writing in their fields

  • The main uses of writing in their
    fields

  • The expectations of readers in their fields

 


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  • Use writing and reading for inquiry,
    learning, thinking, and
    communicating

  • Understand a writing assignment as a
    series of tasks, including finding,
    evaluating, analyzing, and
    synthesizing appropriate primary and
    secondary sources

  • Integrate their own ideas with those
    of others

  • Understand the relationships among
    language, knowledge, and power

  • The uses of writing as a critical
    thinking method

  • The interactions among critical
    thinking, critical reading, and writing

  • The relationships among language,
    knowledge, and power in their field

 


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Processes

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  • Be aware that it usually takes multiple
    drafts to create and complete a
    successful text

  • Develop flexible strategies for
    generating, revising, editing, and
    proofreading

  • Understand writing as an open
    process that permits writers to use
    later invention and re-thinking to
    revise their work

  • Understand the collaborative and
    social aspects of writing processes

  • Learn to critique their own and others'
    works

  • Learn to balance the advantages of
    relying on others with the
    responsibility of doing their part

  • Use a variety of technologies to
    address a range of audiences

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  • To build final results in stages

  • To review work-in-progress in
    collaborative peer groups for purposes other than editing
  • To save extensive editing for later parts of the writing process

  • To apply the technologies commonly
    used to research and communicate

 


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  • Learn common formats for different
    kinds of texts

  • Develop knowledge of genre
    conventions ranging from structure
    and paragraphing to tone and
    mechanics

  • Practice appropriate means of
    documenting their work

  • Control such surface features as
    syntax, grammar, punctuation, and
    spelling.
  • The conventions of usage, specialized
    vocabulary, format, and
    documentation in their fields

  • Strategies through which better
    control of conventions can be
    achieved


    The above outcomes statement is also
    available at
    http://wpacouncil.org/positions
    /outcomes.html
    .

 


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We pay special attention to two sets of outcomes: (1) the WPA outcomes related to genre, writing as a social-cultural practice, and writing with technology and (2) the SUNY General Education outcomes for Category 10: Basic Communication. Since our composition courses fulfill GE 10, we must list the GE outcomes on our course syllabi and clearly indicate how they are being met.

1. Students should “understand how genres shape reading and writing,” “write in several genres,” and “develop knowledge of genre conventions.” Contemporary students are asked to compose in a variety of genres that reflect the different disciplinary, professional, and technological contexts in which we work. While we cannot prepare students for every genre, we can ask them to write in multiple genres, understand how different genres require different writing practices, and offer them methods for investigating the features of the various genres in which they will write. An article on genre theory appears in Appendix A, and guidelines for analyzing genres are included in Appendix B.

2. Students should “understand the relationships among language, knowledge, and power.” We see writing ability and rhetorical skill as cornerstones of critical thinking practices. It is essential for
students to understand that writing is not an individual practice or a private communication between a student and teacher but rather a social-cultural practice undertaken within the context of a broader community of expectations. Our program asks students to reflect upon the formation of their own writing and reading practices and to consider the role writing practices play in the formation of knowledge and the establishment of power relationships within discourse communities.

3. Students should “use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences.” Contemporary
rhetoric and composition includes the study and practice of networked writing (e.g., writing for the
Web, e-mail, blogs, etc.) and multimodal composition (the production of compositions that include a
variety of media). For sample student essays, see Appendix C.

4. Students should be able to produce coherent texts within common college-level written formats.

5. Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to revise and improve their written texts.

6. Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details.


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The outcomes for CPN 100 and CPN 102 are in the areas of (1) rhetorical knowledge, (2) critical thinking, reading, and writing, (3) process, (4) conventions, and (5) technology.

Rhetorical knowledge: Students will

  • Focus on a purpose
  • Respond to the needs of different audiences
  • Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical
    situations
  • Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the
    rhetorical situation
  • Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality
  • Understand how genres shape reading and writing
  • Write in several genres Produce coherent texts within common college-level written
    formats (GE-10)


Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing: Students will

  • Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and
    communicating
  • Identify purpose and rhetorical strategies employed in texts
  • Explore concepts of visual rhetoric
  • Integrate their own ideas with those of others
  • Investigate how writing and rhetoric shape and are shaped
    by social, cultural, technological and material contexts
  • Demonstrate the ability to research a topic, develop an
    argument, and organize supporting details (GE-10)

Process: Students will

  • Investigate their own writing practices and processes
  • Understand how genres and rhetorical situations inform
    writing processes
  • Be aware that it usually takes multiple drafts to create and
    complete a successful text
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve their written
    texts (GE-10)
  • Develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing,
    and proofreading

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Process (continued): Students will

  • Understand writing as an open process that permits writers
    to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work
  • Understand the collaborative and social aspects of writing
    processes
  • Learn to critique their own and others' works
  • Learn to balance the advantages of relying on others with the responsibility of doing their part
  • Use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences

Conventions: Students will

  • Learn common formats for different kinds of texts
  • Develop knowledge of genre conventions ranging from
    structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics
  • Practice appropriate means of documenting their work
  • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar,
    punctuation, and spelling.

Technology: Students will

  • Use available electronic environments for drafting, revising,
    reviewing, editing and submitting texts
  • Use available networking environments to practice online
    communication and collaborative writing projects
  • Practice multimodal composition strategies

Service-Learning Outcomes for CPN 102

Students will apply course lessons to real-life situations from community engagement activities and draw on community engagement activities to help expand on class lessons.


 


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The outcomes for CPN 101 and CPN 103 are in the areas of (1)
rhetorical knowledge, (2) critical thinking, reading, and writing,
(3) process, (4) conventions, and (5) technology.


Rhetorical Knowledge: Students will

  • Study and use genres to write about course theme
  • Respond to different audiences and rhetorical situations
  • Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality
  • Use conventions and format appropriate to genres
  • Write in several genres
  • Produce coherent texts within common college-level written
    formats (GE-10)

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing: Students will

  • Investigate genre- and theme-appropriate research and
    writing practices
  • Learn to find, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • Incorporate their own ideas with those of others
  • Study the cultural and social roles of genres
  • Study how cultural, social, technological, and material
    contexts shape and are shaped by writing practices
  • Demonstrate the ability to research a topic, develop an
    argument, and organize supporting details (GE-10)

Processes: Students will

  • Study writing processes at work in specific genres
  • Investigate the relationship between their own writing
    practices and those of professionals
  • Understand the collaborative and social aspects of
    composition
  • Use technologies to produce genres for a variety of
    audiences
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve their written
    texts (GE-10)

 


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Conventions: Students will

  • Learn common formats for genres
  • Learn appropriate documentation styles
  • Develop knowledge of genre conventions
  • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar,
    punctuation, and spelling

Technology: Students will

  • Learn appropriate use of databases and other information
    resources
  • Produce multimodal compositions
  • Study the use of networked environments and genres

 


Service-Learning Outcomes for CPN 103

Students will apply course lessons to real-life situations
from community engagement activities and draw on
community engagement activities to help expand on class
lessons.


 


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imageAs the course title, “Writing Studies,” suggests, we teach academic writing reading academic prose and making arguments in a variety of genres but we place academic writing in the context of the study of writing, i.e., teaching students about writing and how writing works. Our goal is to lead students to new understandings of what they are doing when they write and how to achieve what they want from their writing. Topics covered may include the roles writing plays in producing and maintaining social systems and relations; writing across the life span; writing in academia, professions, workplace, and public sphere; historical and comparative studies of writing; and examination of how technology is shaping writing.
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Sections of CPN 101 and CPN 103 give students the opportunity to explore a variety of writing and reading assignments connected with an announced theme. Theme-based instruction deepens students’ understanding of the readings and gives them a firm grasp of complex topics and arguments.
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CPN 102 and CPN 103 are 4- credit service learning courses. In these courses, students perform 30 hours of service learning work in the community. If you are interested in offering a service learning course, contact John Suarez, Coordinator of Service Learning, john.suarez@cortland.edu; 753-4391.

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Amount of Writing

In each of the composition courses, we require students to write at least three
mutiple-draft essays and one in-class essay. In addition, students write shorter pieces such as responses to readings, blog or journal entries, and short informal papers.

Teach your students how to plan, draft, revise, and edit their major essays. Make sure you are not the only one providing feedback Give your students opportunities to peer review each other’s work, and twice each semester schedule conferences to go over drafts of their papers.

In-Class Essay

The purpose of the in-class essay is to prepare students for in-class examinations Therefore, a certain amount of instruction and reparation should precede the in-class writing. Students will do preparatory work (for example, analyzing reading sources, prewriting, outlining, etc.) ahead of time, but the actual drafting of the essay should occur during a class period. You may assign as many in-class essays as you wish.


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The required texts for the composition courses are:
1. readings (your choice of text)
2. the online Cortland Composition Handbook
3. a handbook selected from the following list:

  • Troyka, Lynn Quitman, and Douglas Hesse. Simon & Schuster
    Handbook for Writers
  • Rosen, Leonard J., and Laurence Behrens. Allyn & Bacon
    Handbook
  • Raimes, Anne, and Maria Jerskey. Univeral Keys for Writers
  • Hairston, Maxine, Ruszkiewicz John J., and Christy Friend. Scott
    Foresman Handbook for Writers

You may order your books with pre-printed requisition forms, available from the department secretary, or you may use online forms. For details see http://www.cortlandasc.com/faculty-staff-frequently-askedquestions.
cfm


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In 2009, the Composition Program moved away from teaching writing
exclusively from a print perspective.

For over a decade, the field of Rhetoric and Composition has explored multimodal composition, first in the form of Web page design and more recently in audio and video production.

The investigation of networked writing practices has been part of Rhetoric and Composition for two decades. Students in the field engage in a range of multimodal and networked composition practices from PowerPoint presentations and Blackboard threaded discussions to iTunes University audio and video podcasts, blog and wiki projects, and Second Life installations. Though the Composition Program is not the appropriate place for technical instruction in the use of all of these myriad technologies, composition can and should offer students rhetorical methods for investigating the compositional and communication strategies at work in these spaces.

 

In your CPN courses, please give attention to the creation and analysis of texts that employ words, together with images, sound, and video.

Engage your students in:

  • Digital Writing and Digital Rhetoric,
    e.g., selecting and using online
    images, online video, and online
    audio
  • Writing Using Blogs and Online
    Discussion Sites
  • Collaborative Writing Using Wikis
  • Generating Information Using Digital
    Prewriting Tools
  • Using Digital Writing Tools:
    collecting, connecting, and organizing
    information
  • Generating Information Using
    WebQuests
  • Evaluating Web Sites
  • Digital Literature: digital storytelling,
    remixing texts
  • Creating Podcasts and Podcast
    Resources
  • Designing and Editing Digital
    Writing
  • Evaluating Digital Writing
  • Commenting Online: tools for
    providing peer feedback
  • Editing and Formatting: tools to
    create appealing texts
  • Using E-portfolios to Reflect on

Growth in Writing Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and Other Digital Tools by Richard Beach, Chris Anson, Lee-Ann Kastman Breuch, and Thom Swiss and the accompanying Digital Writing Wiki: http://digitalwriting.pbworks.com/are
excellent resources

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In Writing Studies I and Writing Studies II, we set aside time for digital writing. Each section of
Writing Studies (CPN 100, 101, 102, and 103)
must meet a minimum of two weeks in a campus computer lab. The English Department maintains two computer labs in Old Main, G-16 (PC) and G- 17 (Mac). The Mac lab has a number of courses meeting there regularly, so most CPN classes will need to meet in G-16, the PC lab. Tim Emerson the English Department’s technology consultant, schedules composition courses in these labs on a first-come, first-served basis. Instructors may request more than two weeks, but only after all the required sessions are scheduled. Please request your required time no later than two weeks before the start of the semester. Requesting time much earlier is strongly recommended.

If you are unable to reserve G-16 or G-17, you will have to use another lab on campus and you will have to schedule your classes yourself.

To do so, first check the online calendar: http://www.cortland.edu/acs/lab_schedule.asp.

The calendar will give you an idea of what rooms may be available and the types of software that are installed. The fall schedule is generally added to the calendar around the end of July, beginning of August. Then fill out the “Academic Computing Services Lab

Request Form,” available at
http://www.cortland.edu/english/technology.html
for each of your CPN sections and submit the
forms to Academic Computing Services well in
advance of the first day of classes.


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Procedure for scheduling computer lab time in Old Main G-16 and G-17
Begin by checking online lab schedules posted on the English Department Web page.


Go to http://www.cortland.edu/english.
Under “College Resources,” click on
click on “Technology Assisted
Instruction.”

Click on either
“PC Lab (G-16)” or
“MAC Lab (G-17).”


Or, you could start directly from the technology page (you may wish to bookmark this page): Got to http://www.cortland.edu/english/technology.html.
Click on either “PC Lab G-16)” or “MAC Lab (G-17).”


Please request time in one-week blocks during regular class periods. Requests
will be honored in the order they are received, so please choose alternative times
as well. Please specify your name, the dates, the times, and the lab(s) you choose
as follows:


CPN 100-099 (Tues/Thurs 10:05-11:20)

  • 1st choice—PC Lab, 9/15 & 17
  • 2nd choice—MAC Lab, 9/15 & 17
  • 3rd choice—PC Lab, 9/29 & 30

 


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If you have multiple sections and wish to keep
them on the same day (i.e., would prefer your
second or third choice if it means you can schedule the sections in the labs on the same
days), please indicate that also.


Send your request by e-mail to Tim Emerson
at timothy.emerson@cortland.edu.
Beginning in Fall 2009, G-16 will be equipped
with the state-of-the-art software programs
already installed in G-17:

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For more information about these programs:

http://www.adobe.com/products/indesign
http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/p
hotoshop

http://www.adobe.com/products/illustrator
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobatpro

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Students in CPN 101 and CPN 103 are
required to participate in the Composition Library Instruction Program (CLIP) and attain a passing
grade on the CLIP quiz. Early in the semester, contact the Coordinator of Instruction, Dan Harms, harmsd@cortland.edu, with several
possible dates and times for your sections to come to the Interactive Reference Area (IRA), or use the online form:
http://library.cortland.edu/clip/clip.asp.

Students who miss their CLIP session should
attend a make-up CLIP session. A schedule of the
CLIP sessions is available on the library's Web
site:
http://library.cortland.edu/clip/clip_schedule.asp.

If students are unable to attend a make up
session, they must notify the Coordinator of
Instruction, Dan Harms, harmsd@cortland.edu,
before the last session is conducted.
If you wish to schedule a CLIP presentation
geared to theme of your course or tailored to an
assignment, contact Dan Harms at least two weeks before your CLIP session.


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academic Integrity

Put your expectations for academic integrity on your
syllabus. At the beginning of the semester, discuss
academic honesty in class. Make students aware of the nature of academic writing, i.e., the fact that it engages other writers’ ideas and follows certain conventions and customs. Point out that knowledge of these conventions (paraphrase, quotation, summary, documentation of sources, etc.) is not tacit. The conventions have to be learned. Explain the concepts of intellectual property, copyright, and fair use. Point out that plagiarism is a legal issue as well as an ethical and moral one. Give students a list of examples of different types of plagiarism. Tell them about penalties and discuss some past cases. Make sure they are aware of the SUNY Cortland Academic Integrity Policy, including disciplinary action, outlined in Chapter 340 of official SUNY Cortland College Handbook.The handbook is available at

http://www.cortland.edu/handbook/hb08_10/part3.html

Check out the
Writing Resource Center,
http://www.cortland.edu/wrc,
for detailed information for students and faculty. The resources for students
(http://www.cortland.edu/wrc/acade
micIntegrity.html
) answer the
following questions:

  • What is Academic Integrity?
  • Does SUNY Cortland have a
    policy?
  • What are some examples of
    academic dishonesty?
  • What is plagiarism?
  • How can I avoid plagiarism?
  • How do I cite my sources?
  • What's the bottom line?
  • Are there other Web sites
    that can help me?


The site also offers faculty tips for
designing assignments that will
reduce the likelihood of plagiarism
(http://www.cortland.edu/wrc/forFac
ulty.html#plagiarism
)

 


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In addition to giving written comments on papers and
oral feedback in conferences, we provide students
with analytical rating scales. By far, the most popular
form of analytical scoring is the rubric. You may
develop your own analytic scales for each of your
assignments with the exception of the CPN 101/103
assignment used for the SUNY General Education
Assessment Review (GEAR). In order to comply with
GEAR, students in CPN 101 and CPN 103 must produce
a multiple-draft essay that demonstrates the following
GE-10 outcomes:

  1. Students will be able to produce coherent texts
    within common college-level written formats

  2. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability
    to revise and improve their written texts.

  3. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability
    to research a topic, develop an argument, and
    organize supporting details.

When the essay is submitted for the GEAR, it is assessed using the rubrics and standards developed by the SUNY
discipline-based faculty panel.
Please use these SUNY rubrics
when you rate your students’
papers. The links for the rubrics
and standards are at
http://www.cortland.edu/gear/writi
ngpanel.html
. The SUNY writing
rubrics are also included in
Appendix D.


In 2006 the English Department’s
GEAR Committee created a set of
six anchor essays that demonstrate the traits of the SUNY writing rubrics and the various levels of performance. These essays are included in Appendix E. We accompany each essay with a detailed analysis. These concrete examples will help your students to understand what an exemplar essay achieves, what a mediocre
essay delivers, and what a poor
essay fails to accomplish. Each
essay is preceded by the course
assignment and followed by a
detailed analysis of the essay’s
traits. For additional tips on constructing rubrics, see


http://Web.njit.edu/~ronkowit/teac
hing/rubrics/guidelines.htm

http://school.discoveryeducation.c
om/schrockguide/assess.html

http://edWeb.sdsu.edu/triton/july/r
ubrics/Rubric_Guidelines.html

http://edWeb.sdsu.edu/triton/july/r
ubrics/Rubric_Template.html


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The following italicized statements appear in the college catalog.

SUNY Cortland employs a plus and minus grading
system ranging from A plus to D minus. The lowest grade for which college credit is awarded is a D minus. Failure of a course is indicated by the grade of E.
. . .

Students must complete both writing courses, except for those who are exempted through an accepted qualifying examination. Students must pass these courses with grades of C- or better. D grades are passing grades and will count in overall credit hours; however, D grades in CPN do not satisfy the College’s bachelor’s degree
requirements. Students must retake CPN courses in which their grade falls below C-, especially before registering
for any course for which
successful completion of CPN is a prerequisite. Courses in which students receive D grades must be retaken at SUNY Cortland.

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Students are sometimes perplexed by the grading policy for
composition courses. In order to avoid confusion, we require
all students enrolled in composition courses to sign a CPN
Grading Signature Form that lists the following policies:

  • Students must complete both CPN 100 or CPN 102 and CPN 101 or CPN 103.
  • Students must pass these courses with grades of C- or better.
  • D grades are passing grades and will count in students’ overall credit hours; however, D grades in CPN do not satisfy the College’s bachelor’s degree requirements.
  • Students must retake CPN courses in which their grade falls below C-, especially before registering for any course for which successful completion of CPN is a prerequisite, including Writing-Intensive courses and any English course above the 200- level.
  • Students receiving grades below C- in composition courses must retake the course in which they received the grade. In other words, students in CPN 100 must retake CPN 100; students in CPN 102 must retake CPN 102; students in CPN 101 must retake CPN 101; students in CPN 103 must retake CPN 103.
  • Courses in which students receive D grades must be retaken at SUNY Cortland.
  • Students who have not completed the requirements for clearing an Incomplete in CPN 100 or CPN 102 by the first day of the CPN 101 or CPN 103 class for which they have registered will not be allowed to remain in that class.

At the beginning of each semester, you will receive copies of the CPN Grading Signature Form for all your students. Please explain the policies to them and have them sign the form. Keep the forms for your records. A copy of the form is included in the Appendix F.

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Mid-semester and final grades are submitted electronically on RedDragon. Be sure to save each page before moving to the next page. At the end of the process, you will receive the following statement: “You have successfully saved and submitted your grades.” Students who have not attended your class should receive a grade of “E.” At mid-semester we assign grades of S/U. myRedDragon: The username/password is the same account you use to log on to your Webmail account, office machine, classroom computer and e-mail. If you have problems logging in, contact the technology help center: Technology Help Center, Winchell Hall, P: 607.753.2500, F: 607.753.5599; helpdesk@cortland.edu; Hours: M-Th, 8:00-6:00; F, 8:00-4:30; Summer Hours: M-F, 8:00-4:30. If you are unreachable during the Winter and/or Summer Breaks, please leave your grade book with the department secretary.

Change of Grade

The following information is taken from the Cortland catalog:


Change of Grade Time Line

A change of grade due to instructor error or student appeal must be submitted by the end of the following semester, i.e., a grade submitted in the fall semester must be changed by the end of the spring semester.
Grade changes submitted more than one semester after the initial semester in which the grade was issued will not be accepted. Once a student’s degree is conferred, the academic record is frozen and no further grade adjustments will be made.

Student status decisions that are pending due to academic tribunal action, grievance or appeal activity, will supersede any time line.
http://catalog.cortland.edu/content.php?catoid=10&navoid=537#evaluation

 

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If you are teaching CPN 101 or CPN 103, at the beginning of the semester check that your students have either received a passing grade in CPN 100 or CPN 102 or a comparable course at another college or exempted from the first composition course because of their scores on a qualifying exam. Tell students who have not fulfilled the prerequisites that they must drop the course.

imageFaculty Meetings
At the end of each semester,
the composition instructors
meet to discuss program
curriculum, requirements,
policies, and instruction. You
are strongly encouraged to
attend these meetings.

 

 


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Syllabus Requirements


  • Each semester give copies of your course syllabi to the department secretaries and post
    copies on your office door.
    Your syllabus should contain the following information:
  • course number, section, title, and semester

  • name of instructor, location of office, e-mail address and phone number, and office hours

  • course catalog description

  • statement about course theme (for CPN 101 and CPN 103)

  • GE-10 learning outcomes

  • statement of course objectives consistent with the catalog description and the objectives
    specified in this handbook required and optional texts

  • course requirements regarding essays, other writing, and student performances evaluated in the course, including the relative weight assigned to each requirement and the required length of each essay

  • requirement of CPN Grading Signature Form

  • requirement of successful completion of CLIP (for CPN 101 and CPN 103)

  • statement of your course policies, e.g., policy for late papers

  • statement of your attendance policy. The College Attendance Policy (which you may
    follow or not, as long as your policy is not more strict than the College policy) is explained in
    Section 410.12 of the College Handbook:
    http://www.cortland.edu/handbook/hb08_10/part4.html#Anchor-410.12-47383

  • a statement on academic integrity (Refer to the College Handbook:
    http://www.cortland.edu/handbook/hb08_10/part3.html#Anchor-CHAPTER-55306 )

  • the college’s boilerplate statement on services available for students with disabilities:
    If you are a student with a disability and wish to request accommodations, please
    contact the Office of Student Disability Services located in B-40 Van Hoesen Hall or
    call (607) 753-2066 for an appointment. Information regarding your disability will be
    treated in a confidential manner. Because many accommodations require early
    planning, requests for accommodations should be made as early as possible.

  • course calendar of readings, activities, assignments, deadlines, and dates your classes are
    meeting in the computer lab


Sample syllabi for CPN 100 and CPN 101 are available in the Appendix G.

 


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In order to maintain high educational quality, we cap composition courses at 22 students. If students ask you to add them to your class roster, tell them you are unable to do so because we have a strict policy against over-enrolling composition courses.

 

 

 

 

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SafeAssign is a plagiarism detection service offered within Blackboard. For an explanation of how Safe Assign works, see http://wiki.safeassign.com/display/SAFE/Home. For training, contact Hailey Ruoff ,753-2231; hailey.ruoff@cortland.edu.

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If you wish to give a final exam, you must give it during the final exam period. No quizzes, in-class exams or tests of any type (except lab exams) are permitted during the last week of classes, unless special permission is granted by the Associate Dean. No exams, tests or projects are to be scheduled or given on Study Days.

 


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Academic Support and Achievement Program (ASAP) tutors are available to assist students with their writing. Students may stop by the ASAP office at Van Hoesen, Room B-205, or call 753-4309 for an appointment. You may refer your students to ASAP. Please use the ASAP referral form, available in the English office. You may also request follow-up reports on your students’ progress. If you
wish to take this approach, here is ASAP’s procedure:

  1. Briefly discuss the paper and its deficiencies with the student in order to clarify the reasons the assignment did not meet
    your standards for college writing.
  2. Advise the student that a written referral has been sent to ASAP in B 205 Van Hoesen, (ext. 4309) and that he/she should make an appointment to begin rewriting the paper.
  3. Attach the faculty referral to the paper, checking areas of weakness, and forward to ASAP, B 205 Van Hoesen, by campus mail.
  4. With the guidance of an ASAP staff member, the student will begin the revision process according to the instructor’s suggestions. Following the first or second meeting with the
    student, the tutor will forward a brief written report to the instructor. If after this initial report an instructor needs additional information about a referred student’s progress, effort or attitude, he/she should contact ASAP.
  5. When the student has developed an understanding for needed changes and completed the revision, the new draft will be
    submitted to the instructor.

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Writing Resource Center:
http://www.cortland.edu/wrc.


The Writing Resource Center
explains the College’s
Composition and Writing-
Intensive (WI) Course
requirements and gives you
detailed information about writing
across the curriculum (WAC), WI
courses, and other writing
initiatives at Cortland. You will
find the form for requesting WI
designation for a course, a sample WI form and syllabus, and the online version of the faculty WAC writing guide, including its discipline-specific bibliographies for teaching and assigning writing. The site also has links to Web sites with useful tips for teaching writing and preventing and detecting plagiarism.


Refer your students to the
Cortland Online Writing
Resource Center’s “Resources for Students” for valuable help with writing assignments. The site
offers student essays written in
CPN 100 and CPN 101, tells
students how to submit work to
the College’s annual writing
contest, offers a detailed explanation of academic honesty
and advice on avoiding plagiarism, and gives links to
handbooks for writers,
documentation guides, reference
books, online writing labs, and
resources for writing in virtually
every department in the College.

 


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Academic Grievances

The following information is taken from the college handbook:


A. The Department Level

  1. In the case of grievance a student has with an instructor, the
    student should attempt an informal settlement with the instructor. There may be instances when the student feels s/he needs to involve his or her advisor or department chair in a specific case.
  2. 2. If no mutually satisfactory informal settlement can be reached with the instructor, then the student may file a written statement of his or her grievance with the chair of the department in which the grievance occurred. The chair shall hold an informal meeting with the student and the instructor, and make a decision within one week after that meeting.
  3. 3. If either party is dissatisfied with the decision made by the
    department chair, it is the responsibility of the department chair to inform both parties of the next possible recourse, namely to appeal the decision to the dean of the school in which the department is located. Intent to appeal is to be filed, in writing, in the office of the school dean within 10 days after receipt of the department chair’s decision.
  4. 4. If the grievance is initially with a department chair, then the
    student is to attempt informal settlement with the chair. If no
    mutually satisfactory decision can be reached, then the grievance is to be filed with the school dean as outlined above.

http://www.cortland.edu/handbook/hb08_10/part3.html#Anchor-CHAPTER-47833

Student Consent to
Release Information

Please comply with the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA).


Do not disclose information about
students, including grades, unless
you have their written permission. If
students wish to grant access to
student academic information to a
particular party (e.g., parent or legal guardian), they must complete the Consent for Access form in the Registrar's Office.

Withdrawal from a Course

Withdrawal From Course forms are
available at

http://www.cortland.edu/registrar/forms.html

Please note that the deadline for withdrawing is November 15 in the fall and April 15 in the spring. Appropriate signatures must be obtained from the Associate Dean before submitting this form for approval.

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SUNY
Cortland
What you need to know about
Personnel
Policies and procedures

A substantial portion of the material in Part II is taken from the English Department Organizational Plan. The complete plan is available on the English Department homepage athttp://www.cortland.edu/english/.


Part-time Lecturers

  • Classroom Observations
  • Classroom Observation-Report Form
  • Course Teacher Evaluations
  • Term Appointments
  • Mentors
  • Policy for Retrenchment of Part-Time Faculty Full-time Lecturers
  • Renewal of Term Appointment for Non-Tenure Track Full-time Lecturers
  • Advancement of Non-Tenure Track Full-time Lecturers
  • Discretionary Salary Increase Criteria

 


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Part-time
Lecturers


In light of Department needs,
the Personnel Committee
evaluates part-time lecturers
for reappointment on the best
available evidence of effective
teaching, particularly as
indicated by classroom
observations and student
course-teacher evaluations
(CTEs). The Personnel
Committee may recommend
against rehiring an instructor if
the committee receives two
unsatisfactory observation
reports about the instructor
from two different observers
during one semester, along
with other substantiating
information.


Of the evaluation instruments,
the following are required for
part-time lecturers:

  • classroom observation during the second semester of employment and, in cases of continued reappointment,
    another during the second and third years of employment

  • course teacher evaluations for the first time the part-time
    lecturer teaches a course and every subsequent third time.

 

Class Observations

according to English Department policy, all part-time faculty members who wish to be reappointed and are not on term appointments have to be evaluated once a year. This evaluation will be based primarily on colleague appraisals of classroom teaching and student evaluations of all courses. A member of the Personnel Committee will observe one of your classes. Your assigned observer will contact you to make arrangements for the observation and a pre-visit conference. At the pre-visit conference, please give the observer the following materials:

  • Your syllabus
  • Copies of readings,
    papers, or handouts
    that will be discussed
    in class
  • A copy of your
    analytical grading
    scale
  • Three or four graded
    papers (please include
    the students'
    preliminary drafts
    along with their final
    copy)


The section on class observations from the Department's Organizational
Plan, Chapter Two, Personnel Policies and Procedures, Personnel Committee Classroom Observations, is reprinted in the column to the
right.

10. The observer and the staff
member will meet before class
time in order to discuss what the
instructor plans for that particular
class, what background the class
has already had relevant to that
day's lesson, and what purpose
the instructor is hoping to
accomplish.

11. After the observation, the
observer will not discuss the class with the instructor. The
instructor will not press the
observer for an opinion about the
class before the observer has
written an observation report,
using the Departmentally-adopted Classroom Observation Report form, a copy of which is attached in the Appendix, below.

12. The observer will give a copy
of her report to the instructor and
arrange a time to discuss that
report. After the discussion, the
observer has the option to revise
the report if such revision seems
warranted. The final observation
report will be forwarded to the
Chair of the Personnel Committee with a copy going to the instructor and to the instructor’s department personnel file.

13. If the observation report is
largely unfavorable the observer
will say so explicitly in her
report, so that the Personnel
Committee can arrange a second
observation by a different
observer.

14. If the staff member being
observed is dissatisfied with the
results of a classroom
observation, he may request a
second observation by a different
observer regardless of the
judgment of the first observer.

 


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Part-Time Lecturers
(continued)


Classroom Observation
Report Form


The Department’s Classroom Observation-
Report Form includes the following items:

  1. Describe the quality of the instructor's teaching as it relates to the mastery of the subject matter and the achievement of the objectives for this particular class period.
  2. Describe the method of instruction.
  3. How clear and well organized is the presentation?
  4. How does the lesson relate to the course objectives as spelled out in the department’s and the instructor’s course outline?
  5. Do you consider the instruction to be of an
    appropriate level?
  6. Describe the form and extent of student
    participation.
  7. What specific suggestions would you make to
    improve the instruction in this particular class?
  8. After examining several graded papers, do you find that the grading is thorough and that it is based on a clear statement of grading principles?

Pre-visit conference:

Post-visit conference:

Instructor has read this report:

On balance this class was satisfactory.


Course Teacher Evaluations
(CTEs
)

The Department recommends, for all teaching staff, course-teacher evaluations for every class every semester. The CTE form used for writing courses appears in the Appendix H. The form used for all other courses appears in Appendix I.

Term Appointments


Reappointments after the sixth consecutive
semester of employment are term appointments. Term appointments ensure (1) that the appointees have the right to a notice of forty-five days before any termination of employment, and (2) that, provided performance evaluations remain satisfactory, the appointees who wish to be re-hired will be given priority over all other candidates for
subsequent part-time lectureships.

Mentors


To assist faculty in the first semester of employment, the Department will assign to each new faculty member a mentor from among the full-time faculty. The mentor shall assist to the degree mutually agreed upon by both persons. It is the mentor’s
responsibility to arrange orientation meetings with his or her mentee early in the mentee’s first semester at Cortland. The mentor may observe the new faculty member during the first semester of employment and, based on that observation, offer advice on teaching techniques. That observation and other matters discussed between mentor and
mentee shall be completely confidential so that the new person shall be free from evaluative pressure during the first semester of employment.


Policy for Retrenchment of
Part-Time Faculty

The following statement is taken from the
Department's Organizational Plan, Chapter
Two, Personnel Policies and Procedures,
Section D.

Policy for Retrenchment of Part-Time Faculty: When class sections are reduced and reduction in part-time faculty is suddenly required, those hired last will be released first. That is, the order of release will be the inverse of the order of hiring.

 


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Full-time Lecturers


Renewal of Term Appointment for Non-Tenure Track Full-time Lecturers


The section on Procedures for Renewal of Term Appointment for Non-Tenure Track Fulltime Lecturers is taken from the Department's Organizational Plan, Chapter Two, Personnel Policies and Procedures, Section D.

Section D: Procedures for Renewal of Term Appointment for Non-Tenure Track Full-time
Lecturers

It is the responsibility of the Chair of the English Department to inform the Department
members of the period, set by the Dean of the School, when consideration of person seeking
renewal of term appointments is impending.

  1. It is the responsibility of persons seeking renewal of term appointment to prepare a personnel dossier for consideration of personnel action. The department requires the “Information Form for Full-time Lecturers” as the form for presentation of data. Supporting materials may be submitted in the blue binders provided for each department member, which establishes a standard organization of materials. In addition to the mandatory submission of Course-Teacher Evaluations (CTEs) and Classroom Observation Reports (observations must be arranged at least once per academic year as a requirement for renewal of contract), individuals may include in the binder any supporting materials (letters and notes from students, “Congratulation” cards from Career Services, evidence of innovative teaching methods or materials, syllabi and course materials, evidence of activities related to teaching, etc.) that the candidate deems appropriate. These materials will be deposited in the X drawer in the English Department office so that Personnel Committee members may familiarize themselves with the materials.

  2. The Personnel Committee will inform the candidate in writing at least a week in advance of the day and time for discussion of that candidate’s application for personnel action. The candidate will have the right to meet with the Committee to discuss his or her candidacy. The candidate will not feel in any way coerced to meet or not to meet with the Committee. The Committee will deliberate and discuss each candidate’s possible nomination for personnel action. The discussion will be confined to the candidate’s teaching record. A candidate will not be judged in competition with other candidates for personnel action, either at the time of, or prior to, the candidate’s application.

  3. The Personnel Committee will recommend or fail to recommend an individual for appropriate
    personnel action. Once a recommendation is made and seconded, a written ballot will be prepared for each candidate for the appropriate action. After twenty-four (24) hours, the Personnel Committee
    members will vote.

  4. The Chair of the Personnel Committee, accompanied by at least one other member of the Personnel
    Committee, will open the ballot box and count the ballots for recommendation. In the event of a
    positive vote, the Personnel Committee Chair will recommend to the Chair of the Department, in
    writing, the appropriate personnel action determined by the Committee, accompanied by a brief
    statement of support. In the event of a negative vote, the Personnel Committee will authorize the Chair of the Personnel Committee to speak for the Committee in explaining in writing to the candidate the reasons for the Committee’s failure to recommend. The Committee has no further responsibility for that nomination, though the individual may go on to self-recommend for personnel action, as provided in Section A of Chapter Two of the Department’s Organizational Plan.

  5. The Chair of the Department, after receiving the Personnel Committee’s recommendation, will make an independent judgment as to the candidate’s qualifications for personnel action. The Chair will make a recommendation in writing, either supporting or failing to support the nomination for personnel action. The candidate will have the right during the review process to respond in writing to the recommendation of the Personnel Committee or the Chair and to include such response in the dossier (blue binder). The Chair will forward the candidate’s materials, the Personnel Committee’s
    recommendation, and the Chair’s recommendation to the Full-time Lecturers’ Peer Review Group, who will in turn make a recommendation to the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences for the Dean’s consideration and recommendation. A copy of the Chair’s recommendation will be provided to
    consideration and recommendation. A copy of the Chair’s recommendation will be provided to the
    candidate concurrent with sending the nomination forward. The Dean will make a recommendation to
    the Provost, who will make a recommendation to the President. The date stated in the College
    Handbook for notification by the President to the candidate is May 1.

  6. Full-time Lecturers will be subject to the criteria described in the Department’s Organizational Plan
    under Section A, “Personnel Committee Evaluations,” nos. 15-24, except that under nos. 25, 26, and 27, recommendations will be forwarded to the Full-Time Lecturers’ Peer Review Group, rather than to the School Personnel Committee. Advancement of Non-Tenure Track Full-time Lecturers

The policy for promotion of Full-time Lecturers is available on the Human Resources Web
site: http://www.cortland.edu/hr/policies.html

See Full-time Lecturers

* Personnel Actions Calendar (PDF)
* Full-time Lecturer Agreement (rev. 6/2004) (PDF)
• Application Checklist (PDF)

In those years when a candidate is applying both for promotion and for reappointment, the
English Department will allow an application for promotion to double as an application for
reappointment. Keep in mind that the Department's procedures for reappointment require a
classroom observation and that the College's procedures for promotion do not.


Discretionary Salary Increase Criteria


See Chapter Three of the English Department Organizational Plan:
http://www.cortland.edu/english/.

 

 


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SUNY
Cortland

What you need to know about
Available Resources

Resources for Writing Teachers

  • Writing Resource Center
  • NCTE
  • University pages
  • Grammar
  • Academic Integrity

Resources for SUNY Cortland Faculty

  • Academic calendars
  • Campus map
  • College Catalog
  • Course Schedule
  • Employee Assistance Program
  • Employee benefits
  • English Department
  • Faculty and staff directories
  • Final exam schedule
  • Fitness
  • Human Resources
  • ID card
  • Library
  • Parking
  • Payroll
  • Technology help center
  • Textbook requisitions
  • Union, United University Professors

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http://www.cortland.edu/wrc
CompPile, 1939-Current, an inventory of publications in college composition:
http://comppile.org/search/comppile_main_search.php
Teaching Composition: http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/tc/
National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE): http://www.ncte.org/college
Journals in Rhetoric and Composition: http://wpacouncil.org/rcjournals
The Web of Language: http://illinois.edu/blog/view?blogId=25
Purdue Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing: http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/bb/

Cornell University Guides

Critically Analyzing Information Sources:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill26.htm
The Seven Steps of the Research Process:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill1.htm

Distinguishing Scholarly Journals from Other Periodicals:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill20.html

How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill28.htm

 

Effective Assignments Using Library and Internet Resources (UC Berkeley):
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/assignments.html
Creating Effective Research Assignments (U Maryland):
http://www.lib.umd.edu/guides/assignment.html
Designing Assignments (U Washington):
http://www.lib.washington.edu/help/guides/design.html
Materials for Faculty, Institute for Writing & Rhetoric (Dartmouth):
http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/faculty/index.html

Grammar:


The Assembly for the Teaching of English Grammar:
http://www.ateg.org/
Guide to Grammar and Style (Jack Lynch, Rutgers):
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Writing/index.html
Grammar Girl:
http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/

Academic Integrity: Interactive Tutorials:


Acadia U:
http://library.acadiau.ca/tutorials/plagiarism/
Rutgers:
http://www.scc.rutgers.edu/douglass/sal/plagiarism/intro.html
UCLA:
http://www.library.ucla.edu/bruinsuccess/
Eastern Kentucky:
http://www.library.eku.edu/tutorials/honesty/

 


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Academic calendars: http://www.cortland.edu/resources/calendars.html
Affirmative Action: http://www.cortland.edu/hr/aaction.html
ASAP, the Academic Support and Achievement Program: www.cortland.edu/asap/
Auxiliary Services Corporation ASC:http://www.cortlandasc.com/

For information about ordering textbooks, setting up a Privileges (discount) dining
account, and obtaining an ID card.

Campus map http://www2.cortland.edu/about/maps-and-directions/
Classroom media services: http://www.cortland.edu/cms/
College catalog: http://www.cortland.edu/catalog/
College handbook: http://www.cortland.edu/handbook/index.html
College store: http://www.cortlandasc.com/collegestore/
Computing services: http://www.cortland.edu/acs/
Course schedule: http://www.cortland.edu/registrar/coursescheduleregistration.html
Employee Assistance Program: http://www.cortland.edu/eap/

Employee benefits: http://www.cortland.edu/hr/benefits.html
English Department: http://www.cortland.edu/english/
Faculty new to Cortland area: http://www.cortland.edu/resources/newfaculty.html
Faculty and staff directories: http://www.cortland.edu/search/e-mail.asp
Final exam schedule: http://www.cortland.edu/registrar/finalexamschedule.html
Fitness facilities and programs:
http://www2.cortland.edu/offices/recreational-sports/fitness-facilities-programs/
Human Resources: http://www.cortland.edu/hr/ Payroll, salary, benefits, etc.
ID card: http://www.cortlandasc.com/idcard/
Information Resources: http://www.cortland.edu/ir/

For assistance with elearning, Red Dragon account, putting your course on Blackboard/WebCT, and using SafeAssignment, the plagiarism detection service. Also contact Hailey M. Ruoff, Instructional Materials Design Specialist hailey.ruoff@cortland.edu, (607) 753-2231

Library: http://library.cortland.edu/
Parking & university police: http://www.cortland.edu/univpolice/homepage.html
Parking permit registration: http://studentinfo.cortland.edu/pls/prod/park.main
Payroll: http://www.cortland.edu/business/payroll.html
Registrar’s office: http://www.cortland.edu/registrar/
Service learning: http://www2.cortland.edu/programs/civic-engagement/servicelearning/
Technology help center: http://www.cortland.edu/acs/support.asp; helpdesk@cortland.edu
Textbook requisitions: http://bookstore.cortlandasc.com/buy_premain.asp
Union, United University Professors: http://www.uupinfo.org/
Writing Resource Center: http://www.cortland.edu/wrc
Additional resources are available at http://www.cortland.edu/resources/faculty.html.

 

 


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Students are sometimes perplexed by the grading policies for composition courses. In order to avoid confusion, we require all students enrolled in composition courses to sign this form. If you have questions about these policies, please ask your instructor to explain them to you.

Policies

  • Students must complete both CPN 100 or CPN 102 and CPN 101 or CPN 103.

  • Students must pass these courses with grades of C- or better.

  • D grades are passing grades and will count in students’ overall credit hours; however, grades in CPN do not satisfy the College’s bachelor’s degree requirements.

  • Students must retake CPN courses in which their grade falls below C-, especially
    before registering for any course for which successful completion of CPN is a
    prerequisite, including Writing-Intensive courses and any English course above the
    200-level.

  • Students receiving grades below C- in composition courses must retake the course in
    which they received the grade. In other words, students in CPN 100 must retake CPN
    100; students in CPN 102 must retake CPN 102; students in CPN 101 must retake
    CPN 101; students in CPN 103 must retake CPN 103.

  • Courses in which students receive D grades must be retaken at SUNY Cortland.

  • Students who have not completed the requirements for clearing an Incomplete in CPN
    100 or CPN 102 by the first day of the CPN 101 or CPN 103 class for which they
    have registered will not be allowed to remain in that class.

I have read the above statement, and I am aware that I must retake a composition
course in which I receive a grade below C-.

Name (please print) ________________________________________
Signature_________________________________________________
Cortland ID ________________________
Date ______________________________
Course & Section __________________

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Part 1 Part 2 Part 3