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Faculty Profiles

Alexandru Balas - Director, Clark Center for International Education; International Studies Program

Assistant Professor of International Studies

Education

PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Political Science (International Relations), 2011
MA University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Political Science (International Relations), 2008
MA Sabanci University, Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2006
BA University of Bucharest, Political Science, 2004

Research Areas

My research interests focus on issues of conflict resolution, peace studies, European politics, and international organizations.

Selected Publications

Peace Operations. 2nd edition (with Paul Diehl) –Polity Press, forthcoming, April 2014
The Peace Puzzle (with Paul Diehl and Gary Goertz) - contract signed with Oxford University Press
“Demanding Peace: The Impact of Prevailing Conflict on the Shift from Peacekeeping to Peacebuilding”, Peace and Change 37(2), April 2012: 195-226 (with Andrew Owsiak and Paul Diehl)
“Who Do We Vote For? With the Israelis, With the Palestinians, or Do We Abstain”, Foreign Policy Romania, issue 24, September 2011: 48-49
“It Takes Two (or More): Multiple Simultaneous Peace Operations”, Journal of International Peacekeeping 15(3-4), September 2011: 384-421

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Sharon R. Steadman – Sociology/Anthropology
 

Professor of Anthropology


Research Areas

My main research area is anthropological and archaeological investigations in the Middle East in general and in Turkey particularly. Research and publication topics include ancient and modern architecture, archaeological approaches to religion, and world systems theory.

Selected Publications

Take Me To Your Leader: The Power of Place in Prehistoric Anatolian Settlements. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 363 (2011): 1-24.

Handbook of Anatolian Studies (8,000-332 BCE), edited volume (with Gregory McMahon) University Press, 2011.

“Agency, Architecture, and Archaeology in Prehistoric Central Anatolia.” In Agency and Identity in the Ancient Near East, pp. 27-45, ed. by Sharon R. Steadman and Jennifer C. Ross, Equinox Publishers, London. 2010.

“Excavations on the North Central Plateau: The Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Occupation at Çadir Höyük.” Anatolian Studies 58 (2008): 47-86. (with J. C. Ross, G. McMahon, and R. L. Gorny)

“Reliquaries on the Landscape: Mounds as Matrices of Human Cognition.” In Archaeologies of the Middle East: Critical Perspectives , pp. 286-307, ed. by S. Pollock and R. Bernbeck, Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, 2005.

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John Aerni-Flessner – History Department
 

Assistant Professor of African and World History


Research Areas

My first projects looked at how young people in Lesotho, in southern Africa, who were not involved with political parties viewed the process of state-creation and nationalism at independence. I am currently looking at how these southern African youth viewed "development" in the 1960s and 1970s, and at how they interacted with international "development" actors like Peace Corps volunteers and USAID projects.

Girish Bhat – History Department
 

Associate Professor of Russian and European History


Research Areas

The majority of my career has been dedicated to study of the “rule of law” in 19th century Russian legal tradition. In recent years I have launched a wider investigation into Russian legal culture in global context.

Selected Publications

“Recovering the Historical Rechtsstaat.” Review of Central and East European Law Vol. 32, no. 1 (2007): 65-97.

“The Particulars of Guilt: Final Questions for the Jury Under the 1864 Judicial Reform.” Slavic Studies 38 (Fall 2004): 251-72.

“Uncertain Traditionalism and Jury Trial Oaths in the Early Reform Era.” Russian History 25 (Fall 1998): 271-300.

“The Moralization of Guilt in Late Imperial Russian Trial by Jury: The Early Reform Era.” Law and History Review 15.1(Spring 1997): 77-113.

“Late Imperial Russian Trial By Jury as Consensual Justice,” in Reforming Justice in Russia, 1984-1991: Power, Culture, and the Limits of Legal Order, Peter H. Solomon (ed.), (Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1997): 61-81.

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Gigi Peterson – History Department
 

Assistant Professor of US and Latin American History


Research Areas

My primary research interests center on transnational dimensions of labor and civil rights histories, focusing on the Americas and Pacific Rim. Past and current projects explore twentieth-century activism and state responses in Mexico, the US, and the Philippines. Additional research addresses teaching issues, from social studies curricula to academic integrity.

Selected Publications

“Recobrando/Recovering ‘The Struggle Against Racial Discrimination’: The Journey of Pablo O’Higgins’s Mural for the Ship Scalers Union of Seattle. Labor: Studies in Working Class History of the Americas, Winter 2012.

“Do the Write Thing: Reflections on Academic Integrity.” Perspectives on History (December 2008).

“‘A Dangerous Demagogue’: Containing the Influence of the Mexican Labor-Left and its U.S. Allies.” In William Issel, Robert Cherny, and Kiernan Taylor, eds. American Labor and the Cold War: Grassroots Politics and Postwar Political Culture. Rutgers University Press, 2004.

Review of James Green, We Cannot Remain Silent: Opposition to the Brazilian Military Dictatorship in the United States (Duke Univ. Press, 2010), History: Reviews of New Books 39:4 (September 2011) 128-129.

Review of Luis Alvarez, The Power of the Zoot: Youth Culture and Resistance During World War II, (University of California Press, 2008). Journal of World History, (September 2010) 551-554.

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Henry Steck – Political Science Department
 

Distinguished Service Professor, Professor of Political Science


Research Areas

My general interests involve comparative politics with a focus on Europe. I have a broad interest in the higher education, both in the United States and on the international dimension. More recently I have also been teaching on democracy and addressing the challenge of teaching contemporary college students about democracy.

Selected Publications

“Higher Education in New York State”, forthcoming in Oxford Handbook on New York State Government and Politics. Gerald Benjamin, ed. Oxford UP. 2013)

“SUNY in the 1990s: Politics, Budgets & the Democracy of Excellence” in Governing New York State, 5th ed. J. Stonecash, ed. SUNY Press, 2006

“Corporatization of the University: Seeking Conceptual Clarity”Annals. Volume 585 January 2003

There Is No Santa Claus: The Challenge of Teaching Democracy. Presented at conference on "Cha(lle)nging Democracy at the Beginning of the 21st Century" – Universitatea Babes -Bolyai (Cluj-Napoca, Romania), October 26 - 29, 2011

Higher Education on a Global Basis: Emergence of Global Higher Education Scene. Keynote lecture at Conference on “The Role of the Universities in the Development of the International and Foreign Economic Relations of the Regions in Russia.” Omsk State Pedagogical University, Omsk Russia. October 3, 2007.

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Richard Hunter – Geography Department
 

Assistant Professor of Geography


Research Areas

My current research focuses on the landscape effects of colonization in central Mexico’s tropical highlands. This research combines a textual analysis of viceregal land grants, field work, and spatial analysis in a GIS to better understand historical land use change in this region.

Selected Publications

“How Incipient Colonies Create Territory: The Textual Surveys of New Spain, 1520s-1620s.”Journal of Historical Geography 37 (2011): 288-299.

“Methodologies for Reconstructing a Pastoral Landscape: Land Grants in Sixteenth-Century New Spain. & Historical Methods 43 (2010): 1-13.

“Positionality, Percetpion, and Possibility in Mexico’s Valle del Mezquital.” Journal of Latin American Geography 8 (2009): 49-69.