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Associate Faculty

ASI Associate Faculty

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John Asimakopoulos is executive director of the scholar-activist Transformative Studies Institute (TSI) and Assistant Professor of Sociology at the City University of New York. He also edits Theory in Action, an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal. His work focuses on labor, globalization, and sociological theory. His publications include articles and books focusing on the history of social movements and how they can inform a new global working class movement for the ushering of epochal change toward a just society.  His works champion the formation of a counter-ideology, independent working class media and educational institutions, and direct action toward this end. 
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Judy K. C. Bentley, Ph.D. Assistant Professor in the Foundations and Social Advocacy Department at SUNY Cortland holds a Bachelor of Social Science degree from Southern Methodist University, a Master’s degree in Special Education/Reading Education from Southwest Texas State University, and a Doctoral degree in Education/School Improvement from Texas State University. Bentley is the Editor and co-founder of the journal Social Advocacy and Systems Change. Her research interests include Symbolic Inclusion, children labeled with “severe/multiple disabilities” as architects of systemic, inclusive education reform, and maximizing the success of students with disabilities in postsecondary education. She can be reached JudyK.C.Bentley@cortland.edu.
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Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics, History and International Relations at Loughborough University (UK). He has published widely on the French left and labour movement in the 20th century. He has notably written A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Oakland, CA: AK Press, 2009) and several articles about the libertarian communist, anti-colonialist and gay rights campaigner, Daniel Guérin (1904-88). One of the co-founders of the Association des Amis de Daniel Guérin and (with Ruth Kinna and Alex Prichard) of the Anarchist Studies Network, he is also the reviews editor of the scholarly journal Anarchist Studies and a member of the editorial advisory board of the French journal Dissidences, which specialises in the history of revolutionary movements.
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Kathryn Coffey—Health/GLBTQ, SUNY Cortland
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Sheila Cohen—Literacy, SUNY Cortland
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Jesse Cohn (jcohn@pnc.edu), an Associate Professor of English at Purdue North Central, was one of the organizers of the first conference of the North American Anarchist Studies Network in 2009, and is currently organizing an Anarchist Cultural Studies Working Group within it. He has also been involved in Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, and Action and The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest, 1500-Present (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009). Chief among Cohn's research and teaching interests, in addition to anarchist studies, are literary/cultural theory, popular genres (science fiction, film, graphic narrative), and contemporary fiction. A contributor to the Collective Reason translation project (www.collectivereason.org), he frequently works on translation of theoretical/philosophical texts (esp. French-to-English). Among his publications: “What Is Anarchist Cultural Studies?: Precursors, Problems, and Prospects,” in New Perspectives on Anarchism (Lexington Books, 2009); “What Is Anarchist Literary Theory?” in Anarchist Studies 15.2 (2007); Anarchism and the Crisis of Representation: Hermeneutics, Aesthetics, Politics (Susquehanna U. Press, 2006).
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Jason Del Gandio is a writer, thinker, teacher, and activist dedicated to local and global justice. Born in 1974 and raised in a New Jersey working class family, Jason spent his summers doing construction and carpentry with his father. There he learned the rigors of manual labor and the realities of capitalism. Jason was attracted to underground subcultures and non-traditional experiences during his late teens, which led him to philosophical inquiry and cultural critique. He began pursuing questions about human existence, the purpose of life, and alternative ways of being in the world. As a college student, he studied philosophy and speech communication. As a graduate student, he studied the philosophy of communication and performance studies. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on the human vibe, which, to the best of his knowledge, is the first and only study of its kind. During his graduate studies, he was heavily impacted by the 1999 W.T.O. protests in Seattle, WA. Witnessing fifty-thousand people shut down an international institution moved Jason in a different direction. He turned to activism and the politics of globalization. Since then he has marched in the streets and stood face-to-face with riot police. He has worked on fair trade, Latin American solidarity, and anti-war campaigns. He has designed and taught college courses such as The Rhetoric of Globalization and Public Advocacy. And he has traveled to Venezuela where he experienced the Bolivarian revolution—a deeply moving experience that opened his eyes to the real possibility of social revolution. Over the past few years, Jason has been working on the theory and practice of “neo-radicalism”—a way of changing the world through rhetoric and communication. That is the underlying theme to his first book, Rhetoric for Radicals: A Handbook for Twenty-First Century Activists. Some of his other writings can be viewed online at Dissident Voice, the Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, Re-Public, Metaphilm, ephemera, Liminalities, and Cultural Logic. Jason is currently an Assistant Professor of Public Communication at Temple University in Philadelphia.

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Janet M. Duncan, Associate Professor of Inclusive Education and Disability Studies, Foundations and Social Advocacy Department, is also the Director of the Institute for Disability Studies at SUNY Cortland.  She received her Ph.D. in Special Education from Syracuse University where she studied with Dean Douglas Biklen, Dr. Robert Bogdan, and Dr. Steve Taylor, all from the Center on Human Policy and founders of Disability Studies in Education. Her research interests include international human rights for persons with disabilities, inclusive global development, and advocacy for individuals with significant disabilities.

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Uri Gordon Ph.D., is an Israeli anarchist theorist and activist. He is a lecturer at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies in Ketura, Israel. One of several anarchist theorists to come of age during the anti-globalization movement at the turn of the twenty-first century, he has worked with anarchist and radical movements including Indymedia, Peoples' Global Action, and Anarchists Against the Wall. Active primarily in Britain and his native Israel, Gordon has participated in protests at international summits across Europe. Gordon's book Anarchy Alive!, based on his PhD research at Oxford University, was well-received by reviewers. He wrote a guest editorial following the Second Lebanon War in Anarchist Studies volume 14, issue 2, and contributed an article on anarchism in Israel to the subsequent issue. He has written reviews for The New Formulation, and Perspectives on Anarchist Theory. Gordon's work has also appeared in mainstream Israeli newspapers; he has written articles for the English language edition of Haaretz addressing the 2007–2008 world food price crisis, and carbon emission trading, and the Jerusalem Post featured Gordon's "Right of Reply: Anarchy in the Holy Land!" in the op-ed in its June 12, 2007 edition.

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Luis Fernandez, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University. He is the author of Policing Dissent: Social Control and the Anti-globalization Movement (2008, Rutgers University Press) and co-editor of Contemporary Anarchist Studies (2009, Routledge Press). In addition to his work at NAU, Luis is a member of the Board of Directors of the Society for the Study of Social Problems and serves as advisor or director to several non-profits.
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Robert Haworth has been interested in anarchism for years; he currently is working on a book on anarchist pedagogy, which will be published with PM Press. He used to play music as a way to express his politics.  He comes from a deep background in DIY and put on many benefit shows for Leonard Peltier, Western Shoshone Defense Project, Food Not Bombs, Autonomy House in SLC, Zapatistas, etc.  In the 1990's he took his politics on the road and toured around the U.S. and Europe.  From '97 to 2000 he co-founded the worker collective Regeneration TV www.regenerationtv.com.&nbsp. Robert also developed parts of the "Battle of Mexico City" DVD for RATM (Chomsky interview, UNAM and Zapatista pieces). He ended up teaching high school social studies in Northern California while doing his M.A. in Curriculum and Instruction at Sonoma State. During the cutbacks Haworth ended up losing his position and moved to New Mexico to pursue a PhD.  He received his PhD from NMSU with an emphasis on critical pedagogies. Robert then left the U.S. to teach at Monash University.  Currently Robert teaches at University of Wisconsin La Crosse as an Associate Professor in Education.

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Ruth Kinna teaches is in the Department of Politics, History and International Relations at Loughborough University UK. Together with Dave Berry she runs a final year module on anti-capitalism and anti-globalisation.  She also teaches modules on European Political Thought and state, violence and terrorism.  Her published work includes: Anarchism A Beginner's Guide, Anarchism and Utopianism (ed. with Laurence Davis) and William Morris: The Art of Socialism. She has also edited a collection of documents, Early Writings on Terrorism.  She is currently working on a research companion to anarchism (for Continuum) and a book on Kropotkin's political thought.
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Mechthild Nagel is professor of philosophy at the State University of New York, College at Cortland and a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Institute for African Development at Cornell University. She is author of Masking the Abject: A Genealogy of Play (Lexington, 2002), co-editor of Race, Class, and Community Identity (Humanities, 2000), The Hydropolitics of Africa: A Contemporary Challenge (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2007), Prisons and Punishment: Reconsidering Global Penality (Africa World Press, 2007) and Dancing with Iris: The Political Philosophy of Iris Marion Young (Oxford University Press, 2009).  Nagel is editor-in-chief of the online journal Wagadu: A Journal of Transnational Women’s and Gender Studies (wagadu.org).  As a graduate student at Umass Amherst, she was blacklisted for a while from teaching philosophy after leading a strike for union recognition.  She can be reached at nagelm@cortland.edu.
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Noelle Chaddock Paley teaches in Africana Studies and Philosophy and is the interim director of SUNY Cortland's Multicultural Life Office. She also serves as a student, faculty and staff advocate to ensure fair and equitable treatment institutionally at SUNY Cortland. Paley has been working with the Office of Diversity and Equity in Education at the SUNY System level and attended the 2010 Chief Diversity Officer’s Conference in Albany. Paley advises student organizations and supervises professional staff members and student workers. SUNY Cortland students have honored her the last two spring semesters as an “Exemplary Woman of Color.” Paley is currently pursuing a doctorate in philosophy, interpretation and culture; was a Clark Fellow; and will be awarded a women’s studies certificate at graduation from SUNY Binghamton, where she previously earned a Master of Arts in Philosophy and a Bachelor of Science in Human Development. Paley received the SUNY Binghamton Human Development Faculty Award for Scholar Activist as well as its Human Development Faculty Award for Outstanding Commitment to Racial and Gender Justice. Her areas of teaching and research include mixed race identity politics and formations; Hip Hop culture; Hip Hop as a philosophic discourse; Africana women on film; prejudiced, discrimination and morality; diasporic fiction; philosophy and law; markets, ethics and law; methods of reasoning; reproductive justice; racial and gender justice; prison abolition; research methods; performance activism and voice training.

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Brice Smith graduated with a B.S. in Applied Physics from Washington University in St. Louis in 1997 (cum laude) and received a Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003. While an undergraduate he worked at Sundstrand Aerospace as an engineer through the cooperative education program and later joined the company full-time prior to graduate school. At Sundstrand he designed flight critical software for aircraft electric power systems (mainly in the Ada programming language) and helped to develop a PC-based simulation tool to allow designers to test their code before the hardware had been built. In graduate school his focus was on soft condensed matter and biological physics. While at MIT Smith studied the mechanical properties of self-assembled biological structures on both experimental and theoretical grounds. Following graduate school he worked for the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, a non-profit research institute dedicated to applying science in the public interest. While there Smith authored or co-authored numerous reports on technical and environmental issues surrounding nuclear power and nuclear weapons production and on the economics and technical viability of renewable resources to meet our energy needs. In May 2006, he published his first book, entitled Insurmountable Risks: The Dangers of Using Nuclear Power to Combat Global Climate Change. At Cortland he is continuing his research on the environmental and health impacts of radioactive wastes. He also is continuing to explore issues relating to the U.S. and global energy systems, particularly as they relate to nuclear power, renewable energy, and the threat of global warming. Feel free to contact him at: http://www.cortland.edu/physics/FacultyStaff/Smith.htm

 
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Mark P. Worrell
Assistant Professor of Sociology
mark.worrell@cortland.edu

Ph.D. University of Kansas
Editor, New York Journal of Sociology
Associate Editor, Critical Sociology

Courses Taught: Sociological Theory, Modern Western Thought, Political Sociology, Sociology of Religion and other cultural sociology courses, American Society, and Introduction to Sociology
Research interests: antisemitism and other forms of authoritarianism and right-wing political movements; labor history; the history of the American communist movement; contemporary, critical, and classical theory; intellectual history; political economy. Recent and Forthcoming Publications: Dialectic of Solidarity: Labor, Antisemitism, and the Frankfurt School (Brill) and articles in the journals Telos, Fast Capitalism, Current Perspectives in Social Theory, Critical Sociology, and Rethinking Marxism. For the latest visit: http://web.cortland.edu/worrellm/

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Ali Shehzad Zaidi is the Director of Publications at the Transformative Studies Institute. Zaidi is also the Vice President of the Southeast European Studies Association (2009-2013): www.seesa.info. He currently teaches as an assistant professor of humanities at the State University of New York at Canton. Zaidi holds a masters degree in English literature from the University of Peshawar (Pakistan), a masters degree in Spanish literature from Queens College (City University of New York) and a doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Rochester.  Zaidi has published comparative studies on Shakespeare and Calderón in Studies in Philology, Hispanófila, Bulletin of the Comediantes, and The Grove. His essays on the fantastic fiction of Mircea Eliade have appeared in Balkanistica, Neohelicon,Interlitteraria, and International Journal on Humanistic Ideology.  Zaidi has written extensively on higher education in New York, publishing in Against The Current, Z, New Politics, Monthly Review, Covert Action Quarterly, Dollars and Sense, Political Affairs, and New Politics. In 2000, his investigative reporting on medical experimentation at the University of Rochester won an honorable mention from Project Censored.

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Tiantian Zheng received her Ph.D. in anthropology at Yale University in 2003, and currently teaches as an associate professor of anthropology in the department of Sociology/Anthropology at SUNY Cortland.  She is the author of four books on sex, gender, migration, HIV/AIDS, and the state: (2009) Red Lights: The Lives of Sex Workers in Postsocialist China. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press; (2009) Ethnographies of Prostitution in Contemporary China: Gender Relations, HIV/AIDS, and Nationalism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press; (2009) HIV/AIDS Through an Anthropological Lens.  Dubuque: Kendall Hunt Publishing; and (forthcoming) Sex-Trafficking, Human Rights, and Social Justice, Routledge.  She has also published a number of book chapters by Columbia University Press, Routledge, Edward Elgar, Assoziation A, Germany, and Shanghai Wenhui Press, and articles in journals such as Critical Asian Studies, China Quarterly, City and Society, Journal of Contemporary China, Modern China, China Perspectives, China: An International Journal, Wagadu, A Journal of Transnational Women’s and Gender Studies; Altérités, and Yale Journal of Student Anthropology
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