Accolade Elm Ulmus japonica x wilsoniana

Quick Facts

  • Disease resistant alternative to American elm

About

The accolade elm is a hybrid of the species Ulmus japonica and Ulmus wilsoniana. The hybrid was introduced to take place of the American elm, whose population saw a huge decline with the introduction of Dutch elm disease. The species branching mimics the graceful arches found in the American elm. The species’ leaves are elliptical in shape and are between 2-4 inches; they are arranged alternately and have pinnate venation. The leaves have serrated edges and are forest green color. The fruit is brown, dry and oval.

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Amur Corktree Phellodendron amurense

Quick Facts

  • It was introduced to the United States in 1856 for ornamental display
  • The wood is known for being rot resistant
  • It is drought and insect resistant
  • This tree is native to East Asia and Northern China
  • The inner bark was used to dye paper for special  government and religious documents in ancient China

About

The Amur corktree is a medium sized tree 30-45’ in height. They have compound leaves with 5-11 elliptical leaflets. The upper surface of the leaf is a dark green while the lower surface is a lighter green. If crushed the leaves smell of turpentine. Cork-like bark with ridges that becomes more prominent with age. Small yellow flowers open in May and June. The fruits are clusters of pea-sized berries that mature to black in October.

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Balsam Fir Abies balsamea

Quick Facts

  • Commonly used as a Christmas tree due to its distinctive scent and dark green needles
  • Resin from the Balsam Fir has been used historically as a cold remedy and as glue

About

The Balsam Fir has a copious amount of dark green needles which can grow up to 1 inch in length. It produces cones that are purple when young but turn brown/green and resinous as the tree matures. Moose, deer, and along with smaller woodland animals eat the buds of young cones and seeds produced by mature one. Blisters filled with oily resin can be found along its grayish trunk. It can grow anywhere from 45-70 feet in height and due to its many needles can be used in a screen or windbreak. 

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Black Gum Nyssa sylvatica

Quick Facts

  • Source of Tupelo honey
  • Van Morrison named his third album in 1971, Tupelo Honey
  • Hollow trunks commonly used as artificial bee hives for early bee keepers who named them “bee gums”

About

Black gum has ellipsoid simple leaves with a shiny luster.  Fall color is full of reds and purples.  Trees are male or female. The purple, paired fruits contain a large single seed.  The fruit pulp is oily and consumed by migrating birds that need to refuel. Southern Nyssa has fragrant small flowers that are desired by both honeybees and bee keepers. 

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Black Walnut Juglans nigra

Quick Facts

  • Native Americans and early settlers in the United States used it for for food, dye, medicine, and ink.
  • Produces the toxic chemical jugulone which can damage many common garden plants
  • Prized in woodworking due to its unique grain

About

They have alternate leaves, which are pinnately compound and 12–24 inches long. They consist of 15–23 dark green leaflets that are 2–5 inches and finely toothed. They tend to grow anywhere from 50-75 feet in heigh and produce a fleshy nut containing fruit starting from early to mid autumn. The nuts will usually not develop until the tree is 12-15 years old. It is a difficult tree to transplant from one place to another due to its long taproot. 

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Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens

Quick Facts

  • Native to the Rocky Mountains
  • State tree for Colorado and Utah
  • Grows 5,000-10,000 feet in elevation
  • Popular Christmas trees

About

Colorado blue spruce is a beautiful species and one of the most popular ornamental conifers in the United States. Colorado blue spruce has magnificent blue-green color with a silver shimmer. They mature to be 50-75’ feet tall.  Stiff evergreen needles are ½- 1 inch long and silvery green-blue in color. The needles surround the branches at right angles, when crushed the needles give off a pungent resinous odor. Seed cones, are 3-4 inches in length and light brown. They hang downward on the branches and are concentrated at the crown of the tree. The tallest Colorado blue spruce recorded in the United States was 100 feet tall and found in Wyoming.

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Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides

Quick Facts

  • Ancient species that once covered vast majority of northern hemisphere
  • Species was once thought to be extinct, until its rediscovery in China in 1941
  • Regenerative species; sprouts new leaders from stumps
  • Closely related to the Giant and Costal Redwoods of western North America

About

Dawn Redwoods grow to be over 100 feet tall with a spread of about 25 feet at full maturity.  The leaves are opposite and a fresh green color in spring in the fall the needles fade to a burnt-orange, red-brown color, older specimen form wide buttresses on the lower trunk.  Dawn Redwoods produce conesbetween 1.5 and 2.5 cm in diameter arranged in opposite pairs in four rows.

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Douglas fir Pseudotsuga menziesii

Quick Facts

  • Named after Scottish botanist David Douglas
  • Northern spotted owls are found in old growth Douglas fir forest
  • One of the most important sources of timber, especially in the Pacific Northwest

About

An evergreen conifer with small 1 inch long bluish green needles that are spirally arranged along its branches. Can grow up to 300 feet in high making it the second tallest conifer after the coastal redwood. It has thick grooved bark which serves as a defense mechanism against forest fires. The young tan cones become bristled as they age. 

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English Oak Quercus robur

Quick Facts

  • The leaf of the English oak is the national symbol of Croatia
  • During the English Civil War, King Charles II climbed up an English Oak to hide from the parliamentarian soldiers.

About

English oaks are large deciduous trees. Their leaves are an olive green color, lobed, short-stalked leaves 7-14 cm long. The leaves are arranged alternately and have an ear-shaped (auriculate) leaf base. English oaks flower in spring and their fruit, the acorn, is ripe by fall. The acorns are positioned on a peduncle (acorn stalk) with 1-4 acorns on each peduncle. The bark is ridged grey. The largest English oak in New York State is located in Nassau county and stands at 88 feet.

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Gingko Gingko biloba

Quick Facts

  • Fossil record indicates the Ginkgo first appeared 270 million years ago
  • National tree of China
  • Seeds are cooked and served at many traditional Chinese celebrations
  • One of the few tree species to survive the 1km blast zone from the 1945 atomic bomb which landed on Hiroshima

About

The Ginkgo can reach to be up to 40 meters in height with irregular branching. The leaves are a beautiful green and fan shaped with two or more lobes which account for the Latin name biloba (two lobes). The leaves turn a golden yellow before hitting the ground for the winter.  Ginkgo are long-lived trees, the oldest recorded Ginkgo tree was 3,500 years old.

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